ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard Minimum Requirements  Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies - Buy new ANSI Kits
ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard Minimum Requirements Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies - Buy new ANSI Kits

Monthly Archives: November 2015

  • Silliness

    Plastic, cheap, disposable, useless... ah the gifts we've been suckered into with all the Black Friday and Cyber Monday hype.

    Feel good about your purchases, or feeling Buyer's remorse?

    Black Friday, Cyber Monday - Blah, Blah, Blah…

    consumerGive gifts this year that show you care. Everyone needs a first aid kit – At home, in their car, and for any special interests or activities.

    The great thing about a First Aid Kit as a Holiday Gift is that it gives twice:
    First the initial appreciation upon receipt of a practical and useful gift (rather than some disposable nonsense gift) and more importantly – they will appreciate it again and think of you when they need their kit and have these important injury treatment supplies conveniently at hand!

  • Sale ends at midnight!

    Don't miss this chance to save on a meaningful, useful and unique gift! http://first-aid-product.com/black-friday-cyber-monday-2015.html

  • Treating Swallowed / Ingested Poisons

    PoisonCall 9-1-1 or EMS immediately. Call the Poison Control Center 1-800-222-1222. If the casualty is experiencing convulsions:

    • Call the Poison Control Center Help line immediately! 1-800-222-1222
    • Do not induce vomiting unless instructed to do so by a medical professional or the Poison Control Center. If the casualty has swallowed petroleum or a corrosive product, vomiting could cause more serious damage.
    • The casualty should never be given anything to eat or drink, including milk or water, after ingesting a poison unless instructed to do so by a medical professional or the Poison Control Center.
    • Retrieve the container the poison was in, with the label and any remaining content, and give this to the Emergency Medical Personnel or the doctor treating the poisoned casualty.

     

    Also read Syrup of Ipecac & What to do: Convulsions from Poisoning

    Content excerpted from the Urgent First Aid Guide used by permission Copyright 2013 UrgentFirstAid.com
    All Rights Reserved. Get a full copy of the First Aid Guide for under $1!

    Poisoning can occur in a variety of ways; from ingestion, inhalation, absorption or injection! Learn first aid treatment for the different types of poisoning (it is very different and specific to each situation). Find out about LIVE OSHA Standard First Aid & Emergency Care at your location... check out American CPR Training™

  • Thanks for the Memories

    Fall TrimThanks.
    Today is the day for saying Thanks. The day to Give Thanks.

    Each year, we try to explore the idea of thank-giving from a different perspective. As we wrap up our 23rd year of Saving Lives and Saving Money™, we decided to give thanks for some of the memories we have.

    There are many funny memories ("Your decorated bandages are defective, they are printed upside down!" "Ma'am, try this: Remove the bandage, turn it around, and reapply." "Oh, thanks! These really ought to come with directions that explain that.")

    There are sad memories ("I'd like to return an order I just received." "Certainly, I can help with that, may I ask if there was anything wrong with the order?" "No, everything was perfect, it's just that these were for my wife, and she passed away this weekend.")

    There are oh so many memories, many fun, many funky, and some not so fun - but it is probably the bittersweet memories that have affected us the most...

    In our business, we are directly involved in tragedies and disasters as they occur. We are grief-stricken and horrified along with every one else, but also drawn into the mix. During 9/11, Katrina, Sandy, and dozens of other world-shattering events, we have had the opportunity to become involved with the rescuers, victims, and survivors. From helping get rescue and emergency survival supplies to the affected areas to directly participating in evacuation and shelter efforts, we've had nigh on a quarter century to see the beauty of people helping one another. This is something we should all appreciate and be most thankful for.

    image of harvest baskets Our Harvest of Memories is Bountiful
  • Preparing for Thanksgiving

    thanksgiving-shareTomorrow is Thanksgiving Day - Today... scurrying around, last minute  grocery shopping, heading out for road trips, general pre-holiday chaos.

    Be safe - remember that people are very distracted, so watch out on the roadways - especially if you have rain, snow, or darkness on top of crazy drivers.

    Once you settle in, remember that a crowded kitchen is a dangerous place... beware of cut & burn hazards.

    Have fun, be safe, and eat, eat eat!

     

  • Treatment for Cuts and Abrasions

    Image of woman treating wound with dressingWhen treating for minor cuts and scrapes, the most important goal is to prevent infection. For more severe wounds, call 9-1-1 or EMS, or transport the casualty to the nearest hospital if safe to do so.

    Treatment

    • Immediately clean the wound area thoroughly with soap and water. Clear, cool running water works best to flush debris and dirt from the injury site. Remove any embedded materials such as dirt from the wound.
    • If available, Responder should use gloves to protect from Bloodborne Pathogens.
    • With superficial cuts or abrasions, apply a first aid balm such as a triple antibiotic ointment and cover with a sterile bandage.
    • If the wound is bleeding, apply pressure with a sterile dressing to stop the bleeding. If the bleeding will not stop, call 9-1-1, activate EMS, or transport the casualty to the nearest hospital.

    Content excerpted from the Urgent First Aid Guide used by permission Copyright 2013 UrgentFirstAid.com
    All Rights Reserved. Get a full copy of the First Aid Guide for under $1!

  • What to do: Convulsions from Poisoning

    Image of danger poison signCall 9-1-1 or EMS immediately. Call the Poison Control Center 1-800-222-1222. If the casualty is experiencing convulsions:

    1. Place the casualty in a location where he/she will not injure himself or herself. This usually means laying the casualty on the floor, away from walls and heavy or sharp objects. Place a soft pillow or clothing under the head if possible.
    2. Do not try to restrain the casualty.
    3. Loosen any tight or restricting clothing, especially around the neck.
    4. Do not try to place any objects or fingers between the casualty’s teeth.
    5. After the convulsion, turn the casualty on her/his side in case of vomiting.
    6. Continue to monitor the casualty for any signs of breathing difficulty or changes in consciousness. If the casualty stops breathing, begin CPR immediately and call 9-1-1!

    Content excerpted from the Urgent First Aid Guide used by permission Copyright 2013 UrgentFirstAid.com
    All Rights Reserved. Get a full copy of the First Aid Guide for under $1!

    Also read: Syrup of Ipecac

    Poisoning can occur in a variety of ways; from ingestion, inhalation, absorption or injection! Learn first aid treatment for the different types of poisoning (it is very different and specific to each situation). Find out about LIVE OSHA Standard First Aid & Emergency Care at your location... check out American CPR Training™

  • Black Friday - Cyber Monday Safety

    With Black Friday & Cyber Monday coming up, identity theft and credit card security are concerns for all.

    Looking forward to Cyber Monday, but concerned about having your credit card information stolen? One cautious shopper wanted to know and asked Marietta Jelks, USA.gov's consumer protection expert and editor of the Consumer Action Handbook, 

    Get her expert advice and follow these steps to protect yourself from credit card hacking. For more tips on shopping, researching products, and knowing your rights visit USA.gov.

    Have your own question about shopping online and how to protect yourself? You can ask Marietta on Twitter using the hashtag #AskMarietta.ask

  • Treating Frostbite

    image of frostbitten face

    How do you treat frostbite?

    • Move the casualty to a warm environment if possible.
    • Remove any wet clothing and wrap the casualty in warm blankets, coats, or any dry clothing. Pay special attention to the hands, feet and face area.
    • If comfortable and safe to do so, elevate the affected area.
    • Immerse the affect area in warm water or use a water bottle with warm water on the frostbitten area. Do not immerse in HOT water.
    • Do not use dry heat, such as heating pads, camp fires, or hairdryers for warming.
    • Do not rub or massage the frostbitten area. This may cause further damage to the injured tissue.
    • Take the casualty to the nearest hospital as quickly as possible.
    • If getting medical assistance is postponed and continuous warming is not possible, gently wrap the frostbitten areas with blankets or clothing to avoid further frostbite. Get the casualty to the nearest hospital as quickly as possible.
    • Continuous warming procedure:
      1. Gently immerse the frostbitten part in clean, warm water (104-108 degrees Fahrenheit / 40-42 degrees Celsius) for 15 to 20 minutes. The temperature should be measured by the thermometer if possible and frequently rechecked.
      2. Continue to add warm water to keep the temperature within the range above.
      3. Do not allow the frostbitten area to freeze again.
      4. Get the casualty to the nearest hospital as quickly as possible.

    Be sure to read Frostbite: General Information
    Content excerpted from the Urgent First Aid Guide used by permission Copyright 2013 UrgentFirstAid.com
    All Rights Reserved. Get a full copy of the First Aid Guide for under $1!

  • Frostbite: General Information

    Image of man with frost on face

    What is Frostbite?

    • Frostbite can occur when the temperature is below 20 degrees Fahrenheit / -6 Celsius, causing body tissue to begin freezing. The moisture in the tissue freezes and crystallizes.
    • Frostbite usually affects outer limbs and body parts such as the face, nose, ears, fingers, and toes first.
    • Signs of frostbite include skin that starts out pink and changes to blotchy or waxy white or to a grayish-yellow tone. This may happen over time, as frostbite develops.
    • Pain and cold may be felt initially, but the area will quickly become numb and have no feeling.
    • Important: Never warm the frostbitten area and then later allow it to refreeze. Active warming then refreezing is worse than doing nothing. If continued warming is not possible, take the casualty to the closest hospital before beginning warming.

    Content excerpted from the Urgent First Aid Guide used by permission Copyright 2013 UrgentFirstAid.com
    All Rights Reserved. Get a full copy of the First Aid Guide for under $1!

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