ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard Minimum Requirements  Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies - Buy new ANSI Kits
ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard Minimum Requirements Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies - Buy new ANSI Kits

Monthly Archives: May 2016

  • Injury Free? Safety is not just a number

    Safety is what? Safety is a goal. Safety is a mentality. Safety is effort. Safety is a work in progress. Safety is something every company should treasure. A quick look around and you’ll see professionals, organizations, schools and businesses touting their unwavering dedication to safety. But what does that mean? Some will point to their low incident rates. Some will focus on record keeping and low fatality statistics. Whatever your definition of safety may be, in order to achieve your safety goals, you’re going to need everyone on board. So how do you create a genuine safety culture?

    Alignment – The Safety Mantra

    safety-scoreboard-large-display-stoplight-scrolling-messageYour first step is to get everyone on the same page regarding what it is you consider a safe environment. If you are focusing on injury free days, is everyone in your company clear on what constitutes an injury? When they take a look at your new days since last accident sign, what do those numbers mean? Is an injury any incident that results in time off work? Is an injury any accident that involves administration of first aid? The answers to these questions will vary depending on where you are in the process. Set reasonable goals and get everyone involved from the start. If you had a lost time incident last month, focus on lost time injuries. If your last lost time accident was five years ago, you’re doing great, but it’s time to do better. Start focusing on any injuries that require first aid. The key here is to set reasonably achievable and clearly defined safety goals.

    Here is an example of a reasonable mantra.

    • All lost time injuries are preventable
    • Every individual is responsible for their own safety and the safety of others
    • Injuries will never be considered “part of doing business”
    • Regular safety meetings will provide a forum for blame free open communication about all safety concerns
    • Every employee is entitled to take action when witnessing potentially unsafe behaviors or conditions

    Ownership

    You’re not operating in a bubble and there is ‘real business’ to be done. You must find ways to continually engage your employees and give them ownership of the process. You are striving for a culture where your employees choose to follow the rules and procedures because they own and genuinely value their safety, and not because it’s been mandated from on high.

    Commit to ensuring that every employee goes home safe each and every day. Encourage employees to take responsibility for their behaviors by celebrating those who identify hazards and report and/or fix them as they are discovered. Give them the freedom and courage to speak up or take action when they witness unsafe behaviors secure in the knowledge that they have the full backing of management.

    Hard Work

    You must support your safety goals with action and hard work. Remember your goal is a safe work environment. Creating and maintaining a culture that strives for continual improvement demands taking action and demonstrating care on a daily basis. Policies, procedures, and zero incident rhetoric mean nothing if not backed by genuine concern and a commitment at all levels.

    Rinse & Repeat

    So you’ve met your goals. You’ve talked with employees and are confident everyone is on board. You’re injury statistics are trending down, and concerns at regular safety meetings are few and far between. Now it’s time to hone those goals and repeat the process with new and improved objectives. Until you’ve stopped ordering band aids, your job is never done.

    Learn more: ACCIDENTS – It Can’t Happen to Me

    OSHA Safety Training & DOT, Oil & Gas, Maritime, Forklift, Construction & HAZMAT From OSHA Safety Series Training and Federal Title 29 CFR to Forklift Safety, to Petrochemical and Maritime OSHA Compliance, we have Books, Manuals, CDs, DVDs, Videos, Training Materials, Safety Kits, Forms, Safety Posters & much more to make sure that your are compliant with not only the Department of Labor and Department of Transportation rules and regulations but also keeping you properly informed about how to properly protect your workforce on a day-to-day basis. Whether its a construction site, hauling hazardous waste or working as a longshoreman, there are specific federal rules and regulations that need to be followed and kept up-to-date with. We are here to make sure that you have available the most most up-to-date, thorough, yet easy to understand material and information on the ever-changing codes of the CFR. Books, DVDs, Update Services on DOT/49 CFR Standards, Petrochemical and Maritime Regulations, Cal/OSHA Safety Regulations, 1910 and 1926 Parts and much more! OSHA Safety Training & DOT, Oil & Gas, Maritime, Forklift, Construction & HAZMAT
    From OSHA Safety Series Training and Federal Title 29 CFR to Forklift Safety, to Petrochemical and Maritime OSHA Compliance, we have Books, Manuals, CDs, DVDs, Videos, Training Materials, Safety Kits, Forms, Safety Posters & much more to make sure that your are compliant with not only the Department of Labor and Department of Transportation rules and regulations but also keeping you properly informed about how to properly protect your workforce on a day-to-day basis. Whether its a construction site, hauling hazardous waste or working as a longshoreman, there are specific federal rules and regulations that need to be followed and kept up-to-date with. We are here to make sure that you have available the most most up-to-date, thorough, yet easy to understand material and information on the ever-changing codes of the CFR.
    Books, DVDs, Update Services on DOT/49 CFR Standards, Petrochemical and Maritime Regulations, Cal/OSHA Safety Regulations, 1910 and 1926 Parts and much more!
  • Remembrance Day

    Happy Remembrance Day...As a Memorial Salute to all those that lost their lives in the service of our Country, take a moment to remember and appreciate their efforts.

    Happy-Memorial-Day-Banner

    Memorial Day is observed on the last Monday of May. It was formerly known as Decoration Day and commemorates all men and women, who have died in military service for the United States. Many people visit cemeteries and memorials on Memorial Day and it is traditionally seen as the start of the summer season.

    On the first Decoration Day, General James Garfield made a speech at Arlington National Cemetery, and 5,000 participants decorated the graves of the 20,000 Union and Confederate soldiers buried there.

    The first state to officially recognize the holiday was New York in 1873. By 1890 it was recognized by all of the northern states. The South refused to acknowledge the day, honoring their dead on separate days until after World War I (when the holiday changed from honoring just those who died fighting in the Civil War to honoring Americans who died fighting in any war).

    It is now observed in almost every state on the last Monday in May with Congressional passage of the National Holiday Act of 1971 (P.L. 90 – 363). This helped ensure a three day weekend for Federal holidays, though several southern states have an additional separate day for honoring the Confederate war dead: January 19th in Texas; April 26th in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, and Mississippi; May 10th in South Carolina; and June 3rd (Jefferson Davis’ birthday) in Louisiana and Tennessee.

  • Treating Heat Exhaustion

    Image of heat exhausted dog

    Heat Exhaustion?

    • Call 9-1-1 or EMS immediately.
    • Move the casualty to a shady or cool place.
    • If the casualty is conscious, breathing normally, and not vomiting; administer small sips of water or non-caffeinated fluids. Sports drinks are an ideal fluid.
    • Do not give the casualty caffeinated beverages, alcoholic beverages, or salt tablets.

    Content excerpted from the Urgent First Aid Guide used by permission Copyright 2013 UrgentFirstAid.com
    All Rights Reserved. Get a full copy of the First Aid Guide for under $1!

    Heat Emergencies range from discomfort to life-threatening! Learn the Signs, Symptoms and Treatment of Heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Find out about LIVE OSHA Standard First Aid & Emergency Care at your location... check out American CPR Training™

  • What is Heat Exhaustion?

    Image of man and son on the beach on a very hot daySigns of heat exhaustion include pale, clammy skin, and heavy perspiration. The casualty may feel dizzy and nauseous. A headache or cramps in the abdomen or limbs are other possible symptoms of heat exhaustion.

    Content excerpted from the Urgent First Aid Guide used by permission Copyright 2013 UrgentFirstAid.com
    All Rights Reserved. Get a full copy of the First Aid Guide for under $1!

    Heat Emergencies range from discomfort to life-threatening! Learn the Signs, Symptoms and Treatment of Heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Find out about LIVE OSHA Standard First Aid & Emergency Care at your location... check out American CPR Training™

  • Heat Stroke First Aid Treatment

    Image of surfer laying down next to surf board suffering from heat stroke

    How to treat Heat Stroke

    • Call 9-1-1 or activate EMS immediately! A delayed call could be fatal.
    • The main objective of first aid treatment for heat stroke is to lower the casualty’s body temperature as quickly as possible.
    • Move the casualty to a shady or cool place.
    • Loosen and/or remove any sweat-soaked clothing.
    • Cool the casualty’s body by immersing him/her in cold water or if unavailable, sponging him/her down with cold compresses.
    • Fan the casualty with a magazine, cardboard, or an electric fan.
    • Do not give the casualty anything to drink unless their condition stabilizes. Once stabilized, small sips of water can be given. Do not give caffeinated or alcoholic beverages.

    Read more: What is Heat Stroke?Sun SafetyExtreme HeatHow do Hurricanes relate to Extreme Heat?

    Content excerpted from the Urgent First Aid Guide used by permission Copyright 2013 UrgentFirstAid.com
    All Rights Reserved. Get a full copy of the First Aid Guide for under $1!

    Heat Emergencies range from discomfort to life-threatening! Learn the Signs, Symptoms and Treatment of Heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Find out about LIVE OSHA Standard First Aid & Emergency Care at your location... check out American CPR Training™

  • What is Heat Stroke?

    Image of hot sunHeat stroke is a life-threatening condition and requires immediate medical attention. Signs of heat stroke include an excessive rise in body temperature, a high fever that can cause permanent brain damage and/or death, hot, red, dry skin, confusion, difficulty talking or walking, or unconsciousness, as well as all the signs of heat exhaustion.

    Also see: Sun Safety & Extreme Heat

    Content excerpted from the Urgent First Aid Guide used by permission Copyright 2013 UrgentFirstAid.com
    All Rights Reserved. Get a full copy of the First Aid Guide for under $1!

    Heat Emergencies range from discomfort to life-threatening! Learn the Signs, Symptoms and Treatment of Heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Find out about LIVE OSHA Standard First Aid & Emergency Care at your location... check out American CPR Training™

  • Sun Safety

    Does Sunburn treatment count ans "Burn First Aid"? Absolutely.

    Sunburn can be first or even second degree, is painful and can be dangerous.

    So what do you need to know? First, how to avoid sunburn, and second - how to treat sunburn.

    Avoid Sunburn:

    Use a sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of at least 30 with UVA and UVB protection. Re-apply every 2-3 hours, and pay particular attention to the most exposed parts – the face, neck, ears, shoulders, back, knees and tops of feet.

    Select shaded areas for outdoor activities.

    Wear a broad-brimmed hat, long-sleeved cotton shirt and long pants when you plan to spend long periods in the sun.

    Be careful of medication. Certain prescriptions can make your skin more sensitive to UV rays.

    ? Sunscreen & Sun Protection Lotion ?

    Image of Sunscreen Pouch, 30 SPF - 50 per box Sunscreen comes in a variety of bottles, lotion packets and wipes.

    Treat Sunburn:

    What to look for:

    • Red, painful skin with possible blisters
    • Possible swelling

     What to do:

    • CHECK the scene and the person.
    • Get permission to give care.
    • Cool the burn.
    • Protect from further damage by staying out of the sun or wearing sunscreen.
    • Protect unbroken blisters with loose bandages and keep broken blisters clean to prevent infection.

    Sun-Blaze

  • Extreme Heat ??

    It is Extreme Heat Week... ??

    Extreme heat is defined as a period of excessively hot weather, with higher than average temperatures for a particular region, combined with high humidity. Extreme heat events can happen anywhere in the United States. Extreme heat commonly occurs in the summer; however the main season for heat waves may vary regionally.

    During the past 10 years, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) indicates that heat waves have resulted in the highest annual average of deaths among all weather - related disasters.

    Beat The Heat Stay HotWhat can you do? Here are 5 Simple starters

    1. Common Heat Dangers
    • #BeatTheHeat with safety tips about heat, outdoor safety, staying hydrated and skin protection!
    • Heat stroke is a serious medical emergency. #BeatTheHeat and call 911 if you see someone suffering!
    • The signs of heat exhaustion- heavy sweating, clammy skin & a weak pulse - mean it’s time to cool off!
    1. Skin Protection
    • A sunscreen with SPF of at least 15 can keep your skin cool and help you #BeatTheHeat!
    • A burn from the sun can ruin your day, so wear a wide-brimmed hat to keep heat at bay.
    • The sunscreen on your skin will eventually dry, so #BeatTheHeat and reapply!
    1. Staying Hydrated
    • Caffeine and alcohol may sound fun, but they’re no good if you’re out in the sun! #BeatTheHeat and stay hydrated.
    • Never attend a crowded outdoor event without plenty of water to #BeatTheHeat. Remember, heat is a major killer.
    • Sports drinks have electrolytes that help you stay hydrated. Drink them WITH water to #BeatTheHeat.
    1. Outdoor Safety
    • Dizziness is a sign of heat exhaustion. If you get woozy, go inside for a cool drink to #BeatTheHeat!
    • If you start to get tired playing out in the sun, go back inside for some indoor fun! #BeatTheHeat
    • If you’re outside during an event, #BeatTheHeat and know where First Aid services are!
  • C.A.R.E. CPR™ Lifesaving Steps

    Image of two first responder students practicing CPR on a training manikingC.A.R.E. is an easy way to remember the order of lifesaving steps to take in an emergency situation when a casualty is not breathing or her/his heart has stopped. Always call 9-1-1 or activate Emergency Medical Services immediately in a life-threatening emergency. If possible, have another person make the call so that the primary Responder can begin the appropriate CPR steps right away.

    • Compress Chest
    • Airway
    • Rescue Breathing
    • External Defibrillation

    Content excerpted from the Urgent First Aid Guide used by permission Copyright 2013 UrgentFirstAid.com All Rights Reserved. Get a full copy of the First Aid Guide for under $1!

    CPR is something everyone should know, but is not something you can learn by reading a great article like this, nor with online training. Think about it... do you want someone trying to save your life that "learned CPR" by clicking a mouse? Find out about LIVE CPR Training at your location... check out American CPR Training™

  • Hurricane Safety Week

    Hurricane_19Today is the last day of Hurricane Safety Week - but only the beginning of Hurricane Season.

    Take time to review your Emergency Plans, and think about your hurricane and other emergency preparedness at home, and work, and on the road.

Items 1 to 10 of 30 total

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3

Back to top