ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard Minimum Requirements  Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies - Buy new ANSI Kits
ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard Minimum Requirements Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies - Buy new ANSI Kits

Monthly Archives: June 2016

  • Disaster Kit Storage

    Where will you be when Disaster Strikes? FEMA reminds us that you never know where you’ll be when an emergency occurs, so it’s a good idea to be ready wherever you are.  That means preparing supplies for your home, work, and vehicle. We always say Tip #1: Prepare your car before you prepare your home. Learn Why..

    The Ready Campaign has information about creating a disaster supply kit for each location.

    Preparedness and Survival Gear: Here. Preparedness and Survival Gear: Here.

    For your home:

    • Create a kit containing enough food, water, and supplies to last at least three days; and
    • Keep the kit in a designated place and make sure family members know where it is.

    For your work:

    • Be prepared to shelter in place for at least 24 hours;
    • Include food, water, and other necessities like medicines in your kit. Keep the kit in one container and be ready to grab and go; and
    • Have comfortable walking shoes in case an evacuation requires walking long distances.
    Auto and Vehicle Roadside Survival Kits – Bug Outs, Auto Emergency Tools & AAA Emergency Survival Kits Auto and Vehicle Roadside Survival Kits – Bug Outs, Auto Emergency Tools & AAA Emergency Survival Kits

    For your vehicle:

    • Include jumper cables, flashlights, clothing, and a first aid kit; and
    • Consider having a fully charged cell phone and phone charger, flares, baby formula, and diapers if you have a small child.

    Learn About Specific Types of Disaster Preparedness:

  • Summer Magic

    Summers used to hold a magical place in our childhood hearts.

    wilderness-survivalSummer meant school break, adventures with your friends and, if you were lucky, summer camp. At summer camp, nights were spent around the campfire, singing along with the counselors on guitars or sitting in terror as ghost stories were told. Days were spent learning archery, swimming in the lake or playing epic games of color war. Camp Singing Wind Team Blue forever!!

    But, sadly, we all grew up. Not so fast says Camp No Counselors, a company organizing adult summer camps around the country. Adult summer camps offer all the nostalgia of the traditional summer camps with a few grown up twists. One thing you probably
    never had at your camp growing up ... an open bar.
    Summer-Camp

    Read more at The Guardian

  • Fireworks Safety

    The Independence Day holiday coming up fast - and with it the wonder, awe, and hazards of fireworks.  Leave all fireworks activity to the professionals. Do not use consumer fireworks.

    Each July 4th, thousands of people, most often children and teens, are injured while using consumer fireworks.

    Even sparklers are dangerously hot and burn hands! These seemingly harmless fireworks reach temperatures of between 1200° F/649°C to 2000° F/1093°C , and cause full thickness burns in seconds.

    ~ The risk of firework injuries is highest for children ages 5–14.

    Also read:

    sparkler

  • Be Ready for Hurricane Season

    Is your phone ready?

    Be-Ready-Hurricane

    Are you READY? Are you READY?
  • Training for New Emergency Managers

    While every new Safety Manager needs an OSHA Dictionary, and the OSHA Safety Orders... there's a lot more to it than that!

    OSHA DictionaryFEMA’s National Emergency Management Basic Academy is the entry point for individuals pursuing a career in emergency management. The Basic Academy offers the tools to develop comprehensive foundational skills needed in emergency management. For those who are new to emergency management, the Basic Academy also provides a unique opportunity to build camaraderie, to establish professional contacts, and to understand the roles, responsibilities, and legal boundaries associated with emergency management.

    The Basic Academy curriculum consists of five courses: Foundations of Emergency Management; Science of Disaster; Planning: Emergency Operations; Exercise Design; and Public Information and Warning. Upcoming courses in the program are Science of Disaster, a three-day, 24-hour training being held August 8-10, followed by the Planning course, a two-day, 16-hour training being offered August 11-12. Applications for both courses are due by June 27. The courses will be delivered by the Emergency Management Institute at FEMA’s National Emergency Training Center in Emmitsburg, Maryland. For more information, visit the EMI website or send an email to FEMA-EMPP-Basic-Academy@fema.dhs.gov. Note: courses may be taken even when participants are not planning to receive a Basic Academy certification.

    The Basic Academy is the first of a three-level Academy series in the Emergency Management Professional Program (EMPP). The EMPP curriculum is designed to provide a lifetime of learning for emergency management professionals and includes three separate, but closely threaded, training programs. The program builds from the Basic Academy to the National Emergency Management Advanced Academy, a program to develop the next generation of emergency management leaders who are trained in advanced concepts and issues, advanced leadership and management, and critical thinking and problem solving. The EMPP culminates in the National Emergency Management Executive Academy, a program designed to challenge and enhance the talents of the nation’s emergency management senior executives through critical thinking, visionary strategic planning, challenging conventional concepts, and negotiation and conflict resolution applied to complex real-world problems.

    Emergency management professionals should visit www.training.fema.gov/empp for more information about which academy best suits their needs.

    OSHA Dictionary

    This is the OSHA reference book every safety professional needs. This one-of-a-kind book contains ALL the terms and definitions from OSHA 29 CFR Parts 1903, 1904, 1910, and 1926 (inspections, recordkeeping, general industry, and construction). Look up a term and discover its different definitions in various sections of OSHA. For instance, "competent person" has 6 different definitions from 9 different OSHA regulations, and each one is listed. The definitions are also followed by the section and paragraph number of the regulations from which they were taken. Important related tables and illustrations have been included to aid in understanding.

  • Spine or Neck Injuries First Aid & Treatment

    Image of skeleton cervical vertebrae lateral

    • Always suspect that there is a spine or neck injury if a casualty is found unresponsive and unconscious, especially a casualty in a car or bike accident, or anyone who has fallen from a ladder or other elevated surface.
    • Suspect and treat for a spine or neck injury if the casualty experiences neck or back pain, numbness, weakness or paralysis to the extremities.

    First Aid / Treatment

    Call 9-1-1 or EMS immediately. Neck and spinal injuries are often life-threatening and require rapid medical attention.

    • If the Responder is alone and must leave the casualty to get medical help, extend one arm above her/his head and roll him/her to the same side so the casualty’s head is resting on the extended arm. Bend the casualty’s legs to stabilize him or her.
    • Do not move the casualty, unless they are in immediate danger, until Emergency Medical Personnel arrive.
    • If the casualty is conscious, keep him/her calm and comfortable. Cover the casualty with blankets or clothing to provide warmth. Treat for shock.
    • If the casualty vomits, move them onto her/his side while keeping the casualty’s head, neck, and body in a straight line. This technique is best done with two or more responders.
    • If the casualty is having difficulty breathing, carefully use the head tilt-chin lift to open the airway.
    • Be prepared to begin CPR if the casualty stops breathing.

    Content excerpted from the Urgent First Aid Guide used by permission Copyright 2013 UrgentFirstAid.com
    All Rights Reserved. Get a full copy of the First Aid Guide for under $1!

    Head, Neck, and Spine Injuries can be the most serious and life threatening. Learn the Signs, Symptoms and Treatment of Musculoskeletal Injuries in a case where head, neck or spinal injury is suspected. Find out about LIVE OSHA Standard First Aid & Emergency Care at your location... check out American CPR Training™

  • New 2015 OSHA/ANSI First Aid Compliance

    Click to see the NEW OSHA ANSI First Aid Kits! Click to see the NEW OSHA ANSI First Aid Kits!

    Well, last Friday it became Official.
    Business First Aid Kits are no longer compliant, unless upgraded t o the new minimum fill requirements.

    New ANSI Standards for First Aid Kits
    The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) has changed the standard for first aid kits in the workplace.  The new standard went into effect June 17, 2016.  Are you ready for the change?

    Meet the New OSHA Standards 
    We offer a full line of kits to help meet the new ANSI standard and OSHA regulations.  Our professional customer service sales teams are ready for your questions.  Just give us a call today Toll Free (800) 933-8495.

    Some businesses will need 145 new items
    Depending on the type of business and number of employees, owners and managers will need to augment their current first aid kits with anywhere from a few dozen to 145 new items. Businesses that qualify to use class A ANSI first aid kits will need 22 more items, while Class B kits and cabinets will require 145 additional items.  In deciding which class of kit is more appropriate for a given workplace, employers should consider the risks and task load of the work environment and the potential severity and likelihood of occurrence of an injury. Employers should also consider whether multiple first aid kits are needed, based on the number of employees, physical layout of the work environment and the remoteness of the worksite to emergency services.

    Click here to learn more about the new ANSI kits or order now.

    FAO_ANSI-First-Aid-Kit-Compilation

  • How to apply a tourniquet

    With the accessibility of tourniquets now (heavily recommended by the Hartford Consensus, the Stop the Bleed program and now also required in ANSI Class B First Aid kits for workplaces) we thought we would share some information on tourniquet use.

     Hemostatic Band / Tourniquet Strap - 1 Each Product Description Genuine First Aid GFAP-62-01 Hemostatic Band / Tourniquet Strap - 1 Each Genuine First Aid Hemostatic Band / Tourniquet Strap is designed with an elastic strap and easy release button. The strap itself is 1" x 12" and it also has the two buckle pieces on the ends. Clever and easy-to-use tourniquet! Bandages and packaging are certified latex free. This item has CE & FDA approval Meets strict conformity with international standards - ISO9001, ISO13485
    Hemostatic Band / Tourniquet Strap - 1 Each
    Product Description Genuine First Aid GFAP-62-01 Hemostatic Band / Tourniquet Strap - 1 Each
    Genuine First Aid Hemostatic Band / Tourniquet Strap is designed with an elastic strap and easy release button. The strap itself is 1" x 12" and it also has the two buckle pieces on the ends. Clever and easy-to-use tourniquet!
    Bandages and packaging are certified latex free.
    This item has CE & FDA approval
    Meets strict conformity with international standards - ISO9001, ISO13485

    After years of first aid courses for bystanders recommending against tourniquet use (for fear of causing more damage than good) it has become evident that bystanders need to have tourniquets available and know how to use them, A person can dies from exsanguination (bleeding out) in 3-5 minutes... faster than from cardiac arrest, and much faster than the national average emergency response time of 8-14 minutes - bystanders are the key to saving lives from bleeding injury.

    CBS 10 News gives these directions:
    Using a tourniquet is something you want to use only for an extreme injury according to Tampa paramedic Capt. Stephen White.

    "An auto accident where someone has a severed limb, shark bites, when someone cuts themself severely," he says.

    Regardless, it's a technique that many physicians and paramedics say you should know in case you ever have to use it, just like CPR.

    While professional tourniquets can be purchased, White says most people will not have one will have to improvise with what they have on scene. Consumers will want to find something clean, in addition to long and at least an inch wide. He suggests ripping a sheet, shirt or towel, or using a belt or even a dog leash.

    White says to start tying it about 5 inches away from the wound. Once it is secured in place, find something sturdy like a stick or screwdriver. Then, tie the fabric around that.

    "Then you begin to twist it and as you twist it, it's going to get tighter and tighter until the blood stops flowing," says White.

    Once the bleeding stops he says, "You want to write a big T on their forehead for 'tourniquet' and the time you got there, so when they finally get to the hospital they'll know how long the tourniquet has been in place."

    It's a simple first-aid approach that can be the difference between life and death, but he reminds people that it is to be used only in an extreme situation or when elevating the wound above the heart or putting pressure on the wound won't stop the bleeding.tourniquet-application

  • Beyond ANSI First Aid

    We've spent the last few weeks "Doing the ANSI Scramble" as our clients have been gearing up and either upgrading their first aid kits, or purchasing new ANSI 2015 first aid kits in order to comply with the new ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard— Minimum Requirements for Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies, which changes first aid kit requirements for every organization in the USA.

    But is that the end of it? It depends.

    First, there are special needs for certain types of businesses, especially ConstructionRestaurants and Foodservice, and companies with Commercial Fleet Vehicles or Trucking. Moreover, some States have additional requirements (California being a good example) and OSHA and various States have special first aid kit and supply requirements for Logging operations and other specialty fields of work.

    And then... there's the new ANSI Standard itself. While it specifies the exact minimum content for business first aid kits, it leaves it up to the employer to decide whthere the should get a Class A or Class B first aid kit and further which type of first aid kit case.

    ANSI says:

    In deciding which class of kit is more appropriate for a given workplace, employers should consider the risks and task load of the work environment and the potential severity and likelihood of occurrence of an injury. Employers should also consider whether multiple first aid kits are needed, based on the number of employees, physical layout of the work environment and the remoteness of the worksite to emergency services.

    Further, they note that an employer may wish to add yet more content to augment the minimum fill for specific situational needs: "These same considerations can be taken into account when determining if a first aid kit should be augmented with additional supplies, as noted in the appendix of this standard."

    The additional first aid supplies they list (and thereby implicitly recommend) are:

    Supplemental First Aid Supplies for Consideration – Applicable Environments

    It is recognized that each work environment is unique and it is expected that a first aid kit containing the minimum required first aid supplies will be augmented with additional items or additional quantities of required supplies based upon the specific hazards existing in a workplace environment. The selection of such items should be based on the recommendation and consultation of a person competent in first aid and cognizant of the hazards and on the number of people found in the workplace. Federal, state and local requirements should be consulted, where appropriate. Augment kits with the following first aid supplies, as applicable:

    FIRST AID SUPPLY PURPOSE
    Low dose aspirin Used to treat suspected heart attack
    Hemostatic agent For individuals with compromised clotting or uncontrollable bleeding
    Electrolyte replacement Heat-stress related injuries
    Glucose replacement Diabetic or hypoglycemic episodes
    Analgesics (oral and/or topical)/anti-inflammatory Pain management; swelling control
    Hydrocortisone Itchiness and skin-related reactions including rashes
    Antihistamine Allergic reactions
    Foil blanket Treat shock and/or cold-stress related injuries

     

    OSHAS

  • Updated National Planning Frameworks Released

    National planning frameworkToday, FEMA and its partners released the updated National Planning Frameworks for each mission area: Prevention, Protection, Mitigation, Response, and Recovery. The National Planning Frameworks, which are part of the National Preparedness System, set the strategy and doctrine for building, sustaining, and delivering the core capabilities identified in the National Preparedness Goal. They describe the coordinating structures and alignment of key roles and responsibilities for the whole community.

    The National Planning Frameworks, one for each preparedness mission area, describe how the whole community works together to achieve the National Preparedness Goal. The Goal is: “A secure and resilient nation with the capabilities required across the whole community to prevent, protect against, mitigate, respond to, and recover from the threats and hazards that pose the greatest risk.” The Goal is the cornerstone for the implementation of the National Preparedness System.

     

    The National Planning Frameworks are part of the National Preparedness System. There is one Framework for each of the five preparedness mission areas:

    The updated National Planning Frameworks incorporate cascading edits from the Nation Preparedness Goal refresh, including lessons learned from real world events and continuing implementation of the National Preparedness System. Additionally, FEMA and its whole community partners focused on clarifying linkages between mission areas; science and technology efforts within the mission areas; and format revisions to ensure alignment among frameworks as part of the update effort.

    FEMA is also hosting a series of 60-minute informational webinars with interested stakeholders to discuss the updates to the National Planning Frameworks. These webinars look to provide information regarding changes and updates as well as to answer questions related to the Frameworks.checklist

    Advanced registration is required due to space limitations. Registration is on a first come, first serve basis. To register, please visit: http://www.fema.gov/ppd-8-news-updates-announcements.

    For a copy of the documents go to: http://www.fema.gov/national-planning-frameworks.

    Direct questions to FEMA at: PPD8-NationalPreparedness@fema.dhs.gov.

    For more information on national preparedness efforts, visit: http://www.fema.gov/national-preparedness

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