ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard Minimum Requirements  Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies - Buy new ANSI Kits
ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard Minimum Requirements Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies - Buy new ANSI Kits

Bandaging and Wound Care

Clean, Treat and Protect is just the beginning... First-Aid-Product.com brings your helpful hints on properly treating first aid injuries at home, at work, and school, and at play!
  • About Medical and First Aid Gauze...

    What's the difference? Why are some only 4-ply, while others are 8-ply or 12-ply?

    Typically, there are several product categories to choose from. Gauze Rolls (Sterile or Non-Sterile), Gauze Pads, Gauze Sponges, Non-Woven Gauze Pads, etc.

    The most common product is the gauze pad which is made from 100% cotton and comes in different “plys” (or folds). The higher the ply, the more absorbent the pad.  On a typical 3” x 3” 12-Ply sterile gauze pad if you completely unfold the gauze pad there will be 12- 3” x 3” cotton squares.  The product itself is folded over that you have 12 “layers” of absorbency.  Hence, if you have an 8-ply pad you would have 4 fewer layers and it would not be as absorbent.  100% cotton pads also help “wick” the wound area to remove the liquid from the wound site.  Sterile product is advised when directly contacting the wound site, however, non-sterile gauze sponges can be used as packing material for a wound or to be used as a pressure dressing.  Most common packaging is 1 pad per package in a sealed and sterile pouch.  However, some manufacturers carry a “2-Pack” that are designed primarily for the hospital market where having 2-pads per package saves on time when dealing with traumatic injuries.

    Non-Woven Gauze Sponges typically have less absorbency and a lower cost point because the manufacturing process is less expensive.  These also typically have more of a more non-adherent effect on the wound site and lessen the chances of lint getting into the wound.  You would have to use more non-woven pads to equal the absorbency rate of a woven pad, so the cost savings can be negated based on the injury.

    Our Gauze Sponges are available in bulk, boxes, and Individual packs - Gauze Dressing Pads for wound care and first aid in a variety of sizes from 2" x 2" and 2" x 3" to 3" x 3", 4" x 4" and trauma, off-center compress and eye pad configurations - Different Gauze sponges for different purposes! Bulk buy or individual Eye Pads, Compress Absorbent Gauze & SmartTab EzRefill Gauze Dressings. ALSO SEE Trauma pads, Sterile Gauze rolls, Non-Sterile Gauze rolls & Non-Stick Gauze Pads Gauze Dressing Pads: Sterile & Non-sterile as well as Trauma Pads, Compresses & even Eye Dressing Pads! Our Gauze Sponges are available in bulk, boxes, and Individual packs - Gauze Dressing Pads for wound care and first aid in a variety of sizes from 2" x 2" and 2" x 3" to 3" x 3", 4" x 4" and trauma, off-center compress and eye pad configurations - Different Gauze sponges for different purposes! Bulk buy or individual Eye Pads, Compress Absorbent Gauze & SmartTab EzRefill Gauze Dressings. ALSO SEE Trauma pads, Sterile Gauze rolls, Non-Sterile Gauze rolls & Non-Stick Gauze Pads
    Gauze Dressing Pads: Sterile & Non-sterile as well as Trauma Pads, Compresses & even Eye Dressing Pads!
  • Can anyone purchase a medical kit?

    Typically, first aid kits are over-the-counter products and anyone can purchase them - in fact, many use the flexible spending accounts to purchase with tax benefits (just make sure they contain bandages to qualify!)

    Furthermore, many will "step it up" to a first aid cabinet, an ems bag,  trauma kit or first responder pack to be really prepared... however, there are some restrictions one a few "medical kits". Some States won't allow sale of kits containing invasive devices (like sutures and syringes) except to licensed medial personnel...

    Adventure Medical Suture/Syringe Medic Emergency First Aid Pack Adventure Medical Suture/Syringe Medic Emergency First Aid Pack

    Which states prohibit the sale of certain medical kits containing syringes?

    The following states prohibit the sale of the Suture & Syringe content Medical Kits:

    Alabama, California, Washington DC, Delaware, Georgia, Hawaii, Nevada, New York, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, and Virginia.

  • Preparing for Thanksgiving

    thanksgiving-shareTomorrow is Thanksgiving Day - Today... scurrying around, last minute  grocery shopping, heading out for road trips, general pre-holiday chaos.

    Be safe - remember that people are very distracted, so watch out on the roadways - especially if you have rain, snow, or darkness on top of crazy drivers.

    Once you settle in, remember that a crowded kitchen is a dangerous place... beware of cut & burn hazards.

    Have fun, be safe, and eat, eat eat!

     

  • Treatment for Cuts and Abrasions

    Image of woman treating wound with dressingWhen treating for minor cuts and scrapes, the most important goal is to prevent infection. For more severe wounds, call 9-1-1 or EMS, or transport the casualty to the nearest hospital if safe to do so.

    Treatment

    • Immediately clean the wound area thoroughly with soap and water. Clear, cool running water works best to flush debris and dirt from the injury site. Remove any embedded materials such as dirt from the wound.
    • If available, Responder should use gloves to protect from Bloodborne Pathogens.
    • With superficial cuts or abrasions, apply a first aid balm such as a triple antibiotic ointment and cover with a sterile bandage.
    • If the wound is bleeding, apply pressure with a sterile dressing to stop the bleeding. If the bleeding will not stop, call 9-1-1, activate EMS, or transport the casualty to the nearest hospital.

    Content excerpted from the Urgent First Aid Guide used by permission Copyright 2013 UrgentFirstAid.com
    All Rights Reserved. Get a full copy of the First Aid Guide for under $1!

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