ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard Minimum Requirements  Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies - Buy new ANSI Kits
ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard Minimum Requirements Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies - Buy new ANSI Kits

First-Aid-Product.com: First Aid Articles & Information

  • Is Your Office Prepared to Combat Flu Season?

    Facility Hygiene Essentials

    All the essentials to keep your workspace free from germs right here! Packed with solutions for all your hand hygiene,
    skin cleanliness, and surface disinfecting needs.

    Our Safetec Hand Sanitizer Bottles and Pouches

    Cover Your Mouth and Nose

    Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. It may prevent those around you from getting sick. Flu and other serious respiratory illnesses, like a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), whooping cough, and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), are spread by a cough, sneezing, or unclean hands.

    Clean Your Hands

    Washing your hands (Wet, Lather, Scrub, Rinse, Dry) often will help protect you from germs. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.

    Avoid Touching Your Eyes, Nose, or Mouth

    Germs are often spread when a person touches something that is contaminated with germs and then touches his or her eyes, nose, or mouth.

    Practice Other Good Health Habits

    Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces at home, work or school, especially when someone is ill. Get plenty of sleep, be physically active, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat nutritious food.

    Our Safetec Germicidal Wipes and Personal Antimicrobial Wipes

    SaniZide Germicidal Wipes are pre-saturated hard surface wipes that kill viruses such as MRSA, TB, VRE, and E. Coli in 10 minutes and HIV-1 in 2 minutes. The towelettes leave behind virtually no lint or particles to scratch or contaminate surfaces. Our dual quat, alcohol-free formula is non-flammable, safe to ship and non-corrosive on surfaces. Pandemic and infection control product, Ready-to-use wipes, convenient and user-friendly. For use on all hard non-porous surfaces normally treated with a disinfectant. When you reach for a Sanizide Plus Wipe you get a wipe that is clean wipe after wipe. The towelettes leave behind virtually no lint or particles to scratch or contaminate surfaces.
    • Kills Pandemic 2009 H1N1 Influenza A
    • Effective Against TB, MRSA, HIV-1, Norovirus, and More
    • EPA Registered
    • Exceptionally Durable, Pure and Low Linting Wipes
    • Alcohol Free
    • Cleans, Disinfects, and Deodorizes
    • For Use on All Hard, Nonporous Surfaces Normally
    • Treated with a Disinfectant (For plastic and painted surfaces, spot test on an inconspicuous area before use.)


    READ MORE ABOUT SAFETEC PRODUCTS
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  • Did you get the Presidential Alert? If not this is why.

    While many cell phones were buzzing with test text alerts from the president of the United States, others sat in silence.

    Several people used Twitter and other social media to note they failed to receive the test presidential alert sent by FEMA on Wednesday at 2:18 p.m. ET.

    The warning system was originally put in place under former President George W. Bush for radio and TV and then later updated during the tenure of former President Barack Obama to include cellphones. It wasn't until Wednesday that it got its first test.

    Alerts go out in the event of a national emergency, and unlike local weather or Amber alerts, users don't have the option to disable them.

    In a statement, FEMA said cellphones compatible with the Wireless Emergency Alerts system that are turned on and within range of an active cell tower were capable of getting the message. Additionally, if a user is on a call, or with an active data session open on their phone, they might not have received the message.

    FEMA is encouraging the public to send comments on the test to FEMA-National-Test@fema.dhs.gov. Among the details people who did not get the alert should send what device they use, their wireless provider, whether they were using their phone when the alert went out, and whether others nearby received the alert.

    READ MORE
    Today's National Emergency Alert System Beginning at 2:18 p.m. EDT
    Stay Alert: Nationwide Emergency Test on October 3
    Get Real-Time Emergency Alerts on Your Mobile Device
    Wireless Emergency Alerts: WEAs

  • Today's National Emergency Alert System Beginning at 2:18 p.m. EDT

    IPAWS National Test of the Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) and Emergency Alert System (EAS)

    The National EAS and WEA test will be held today, beginning at 2:18 p.m. EDT.

    The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), in coordination with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), will conduct a nationwide test of the Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) and Emergency Alert System (EAS) today. The WEA portion of the test commences at 2:18 p.m. EDT, and the EAS portion follows at 2:20 p.m. EDT. The test will assess the operational readiness of the infrastructure for distribution of a national message and determine whether improvements are needed.

    The WEA test message will be sent to cell phones that are connected to wireless providers participating in WEA. This is the fourth EAS nationwide test and the first national WEA test. Previous EAS national tests were conducted in November 2011, September 2016,  and September 2017 in collaboration with the FCC, broadcasters, and emergency management officials in recognition of FEMA’s National Preparedness Month.

    Cell towers will broadcast the WEA test for approximately 30 minutes beginning at 2:18 p.m. EDT. During this time, WEA compatible cell phones that are switched on, within range of an active cell tower, and whose wireless provider participates in WEA should be capable of receiving the test message. Some cell phones will not receive the test message, and cell phones should only receive the message once. The WEA test message will have a header that reads "Presidential Alert" and text that says:

    “THIS IS A TEST of the National Wireless Emergency Alert System. No action is needed.”

    The WEA system is used to warn the public about dangerous weather, missing children, and other critical situations through alerts on cell phones. The national test will use the same special tone and vibration as with all WEA messages (i.e. Tornado Warning, AMBER Alert). Users cannot opt out of receiving the WEA test.

    The EAS is a national public warning system that provides the President with the communications capability to address the nation during a national emergency. The test is made available to EAS participants (i.e., radio and television broadcasters, cable systems, satellite radio and television providers, and wireline video providers) and is scheduled to last approximately one minute. The test message will be similar to regular monthly EAS test messages with which the public is familiar. The EAS message will include a reference to the WEA test:

    “THIS IS A TEST of the National Emergency Alert System. This system was developed by broadcast and cable operators in voluntary cooperation with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Federal Communications Commission, and local authorities to keep you informed in the event of an emergency. If this had been an actual emergency an official message would have followed the tone alert you heard at the start of this message. A similar wireless emergency alert test message has been sent to all cell phones nationwide. Some cell phones will receive the message; others will not. No action is required.”

    READ MORE:

    Get Real-Time Emergency Alerts on Your Mobile Device
    Prepare for Floods Now
    Prepare for More Hurricanes Now

  • The Great ShakeOut is October 18th

    Did you know the Great ShakeOut is October 18th, 2018? Click on the banner above for free resources, links, and to learn how to signup & participate with your group or individually.
    While you're at it... Check out these great earthquake and other disaster preparedness deals at the links below. No matter what you do; be sure to "Drop, Cover and Hold On" on October 18, 2018!

  • Preventing Flu at Work and School

    At School

    Find out about plans your child’s school, child care program, or college has if an outbreak of flu or another illness occurs and whether flu vaccinations are offered on-site.
    • Make sure your child’s school, child care program, or college routinely cleans frequently touched objects and surfaces, and that they have a good supply of tissues, soap, paper towels, alcohol-based hand rubs, and disposable wipes on-site.
    • Ask how sick students and staff are separated from others and who will care for them until they can go home.

    At Work

    • Find out about your employer’s plans if an outbreak of flu or another illness occurs and whether flu vaccinations are offered on-site.
    • Routinely clean frequently touched objects and surfaces, including doorknobs, keyboards, and phones, to help remove germs.
    • Make sure your workplace has an adequate supply of tissues, soap, paper towels, alcohol-based hand rubs, and disposable wipes.
    • Train others on how to do your job so they can cover for you in case you or a family member gets sick and you have to stay home.
    • If you begin to feel sick while at work, go home as soon as possible.

    Our Safetec Hand Sanitizer Bottles and Pouches

    CLICK HERE TO SEE INFORMATIONAL PDF

    READ MORE

    Keep Hand Cleansing Towelettes next to you!
    Cold Flu Pandemic Preparedness
    Cold, Cough, Allergy & Sinus Relief

  • The IPAWS National Test October 3rd 2018

    IPAWS National Test of the Emergency Alert System (EAS) and Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA)

    The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), in coordination with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), will conduct a nationwide test of the Emergency Alert System (EAS) and Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) on October 3rd, 2018. The WEA portion of the test commences at 2:18 p.m. EDT, and the EAS portion follows at 2:20 p.m. EDT. The test will assess the operational readiness of the infrastructure for distribution of a national message and determine whether improvements are needed.

    The WEA test message will be sent to cell phones that are connected to wireless providers participating in WEA. This is the fourth EAS nationwide test and the first national WEA test. Previous EAS national tests were conducted in September 2011, 2016 and 2017 in collaboration with the FCC, broadcasters, and emergency management officials in recognition of FEMA’s National Preparedness Month.

    Cell towers will broadcast the WEA test for approximately 30 minutes beginning at 2:18 p.m. EDT. During this time, WEA compatible cell phones that are switched on, within range of an active cell tower, and whose wireless carrier participates in WEA should be capable of receiving the test message. Some cell phones will not receive the test message, and cell phones should only receive the message once.

    Read about complete details at the FEMA website here: The IPAWS National Test

    Read more about Emergency Alerts at the FEMA website here: Be Informed About Emergency Alerts

    READ MORE:

    Prepare for Floods Now
    Prepare for More Hurricanes Now
    National Preparedness Month

  • The Flu Strikes Back

    The Flu Won't Wait - You Shouldn't Either! Prevent the Flu!

    Good health habits like washing your hands often can help stop the spread of germs and prevent respiratory illnesses like the flu. The tips below provide steps you can take to protect yourself from the flu, protect others from the flu, and stop the spread of germs.

    Good Health Habits Can Help Stop Germs

    Avoid Close Contact

    Avoid close contact with people who are sick. When you are sick, keep your distance from others to protect them from getting sick too.

    Stay Home When You Are Sick

    If possible, stay home from work, school, and errands when you are sick. This will help prevent spreading your illness to others.

    Cover Your Mouth and Nose

    Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. It may prevent those around you from getting sick. Flu and other serious respiratory illnesses, like respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), whooping cough, and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), are spread by cough, sneezing, or unclean hands.

    Clean Your Hands

    Washing your hands (Wet, Lather, Scrub, Rinse, Dry) often will help protect you from germs. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.

    Avoid Touching Your Eyes, Nose, or Mouth

    Germs are often spread when a person touches something that is contaminated with germs and then touches his or her eyes, nose, or mouth.

    Practice Other Good Health Habits

    Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces at home, work or school, especially when someone is ill. Get plenty of sleep, be physically active, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat nutritious food.

    Our Safetec Hand Sanitizer Bottles and Pouches

    CLICK HERE TO SEE INFORMATIONAL PDF

    READ MORE

    Keep Hand Cleansing Towelettes next to you!
    Cold Flu Pandemic Preparedness
    Cold, Cough, Allergy & Sinus Relief

  • Prepare for Floods Now

    Floods are the Most Common Natural Disaster in the United States

    Failing to evacuate flooded areas, entering flood waters, or remaining after a flood has passed can result in injury or death. Flooding is a temporary overflow of water onto land that is normally dry.

    • Floods may result from rain, snow, coastal storms, storm surges, and overflows of dams and other water systems.
    • Floods may develop slowly or quickly – Flash floods can come with no warning.
    • Floods may cause outages, disrupt transportation, damage buildings, and create landslides.

    IF YOU ARE UNDER A FLOOD WARNING, FIND SAFE SHELTER RIGHT AWAY

    • Do not walk, swim, or drive through flood waters. Turn Around, Don’t Drown!
    • Just six inches of moving water can knock you down, and one foot of moving water can sweep your vehicle away.
    • Stay off of bridges over fast-moving water.
    • Determine how best to protect yourself based on the type of flooding.
    • Evacuate if told to do so.
    • Move to higher ground or a higher floor.
    • Stay where you are.

    How to Stay Safe When a Flood Threatens

    Prepare NOW

    • Know types of flood risk in your area. Visit FEMA’s Flood Map Service Center for information.
    • Sign up for your community’s warning system. The Emergency Alert System (EAS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio also provide emergency alerts.
    • If flash flooding is a risk in your location, then monitor potential signs, such as heavy rain.
    • Learn and practice evacuation routes, shelter plans, and flash flood response.
    • Gather supplies in case you have to leave immediately, or if services are cut off. Keep in mind each person’s specific needs, including medication. Don’t forget the needs of pets. Obtain extra batteries and charging devices for phones and other critical equipment.
    • Purchase or renew a flood insurance policy. It typically takes up to 30 days for a policy to go into effect and can protect the life you've built. Homeowner’s policies do not cover flooding. Get flood coverage under the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP)
    • Keep important documents in a waterproof container. Create password-protected digital copies.
    • Protect your property. Move valuables to higher levels. Declutter drains and gutters. Install check valves. Consider a sump pump with a battery.

    Survive DURING a Flood

    • Depending on where you are, and the impact and the warning time of flooding, go to the safe location that you previously identified.
    • If told to evacuate, do so immediately. Never drive around barricades. Local responders use them to safely direct traffic out of flooded areas.
    • Listen to EAS, NOAA Weather Radio, or local alerting systems for current emergency information and instructions.
    • Do not walk, swim, or drive through flood waters. Turn Around. Don’t Drown!
    • Stay off bridges over fast-moving water. Fast-moving water can wash bridges away without warning.
    • If your vehicle is trapped in rapidly moving water, then stay inside. If water is rising inside the vehicle, then seek refuge on the roof.
    • If trapped in a building, then go to its highest level. Do not climb into a closed attic. You may become trapped by rising floodwater. Go on the roof only if necessary. Once there, signal for help.

    Be Safe AFTER a Flood

    • Listen to authorities for information and instructions. Return home only when authorities say it is safe.
    • Avoid driving, except in emergencies.
    • Snakes and other animals may be in your house. Wear heavy gloves and boots during clean up.
    • Be aware of the risk of electrocution. Do not touch electrical equipment if it is wet or if you are standing in water. If it is safe to do so, turn off the electricity to prevent electric shock.
    • Avoid wading in floodwater, which can contain dangerous debris and be contaminated. Underground or downed power lines can also electrically charge the water.
    • Use a generator or other gasoline-powered machinery ONLY outdoors and away from windows.

    READ MORE
    Keep Your Valuables Safe from Floods and Fires
    Hurricanes mean Flooding
    Prepare for More Hurricanes Now

  • Prepare for More Hurricanes Now

    The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 to November 30. The Pacific hurricane season runs May 15 to November 30.

    Hurricanes are massive storm systems that form over warm ocean waters and move toward land. Potential threats from hurricanes include powerful winds, heavy rainfall, storm surges, coastal and inland flooding, rip currents, tornadoes, and landslides.
    • Hurricanes can happen along any U.S. coast or in any territory in the Atlantic or Pacific oceans.
    • Hurricanes can affect areas more than 100 miles inland.
    • Hurricanes are most active in September.

    If you are Under a Hurricane Warning, Find Safet Shelter Right Away

    • Determine how best to protect yourself from high winds and flooding.
    • Evacuate if told to do so.
    • Take refuge in a designated storm shelter, or an interior room for high winds.
    • Listen for emergency information and alerts.
    • Only use generators outdoors and away from windows.
    • Turn Around, Don’t Drown! Do not walk, swim, or drive through flood waters.

    Prepare for Hurricanes NOW

    • Know your area’s risk of hurricanes.
    • Sign up for your community’s warning system. The Emergency Alert System (EAS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio also provide emergency alerts.
    • If you are at risk for flash flooding, watch for warning signs such as heavy rain.
    • Practice going to a safe shelter for high winds, such as a FEMA safe room or ICC 500 storm shelter. The next best protection is a small, interior, windowless room in a sturdy building on the lowest level that is not subject to flooding.
    • Based on your location and community plans, make your own plans for evacuation or sheltering in place.
    • Become familiar with your evacuation zone, the evacuation route, and shelter locations.
    • Gather needed supplies for at least three days. Keep in mind each person’s specific needs, including medication. Don’t forget the needs of pets.
    • Keep important documents in a safe place or create password-protected digital copies.
    • Protect your property. Declutter drains and gutters. Install check valves in plumbing to prevent backups. Consider hurricane shutters. Review insurance policies.

    When a hurricane is 18-36 hours from arriving

    • Bookmark your city or county website for quick access to storm updates and emergency instructions.
    • Bring loose, lightweight objects inside that could become projectiles in high winds (e.g., patio furniture, garbage cans); anchor objects that would be unsafe to bring inside (e.g., propane tanks); and trim or remove trees close enough to fall on the building.
    • Cover all of your home’s windows. Permanent storm shutters offer the best protection for windows. A second option is to board up windows with 5/8” exterior grade or marine plywood, cut to fit and ready to install.

    When a hurricane is 6 hours from arriving

    • If you’re not in an area that is recommended for evacuation, plan to stay at home or where you are and let friends and family know where you are.
    • Close storm shutters, and stay away from windows. Flying glass from broken windows could injure you.
    • Turn your refrigerator or freezer to the coldest setting and open only when necessary. If you lose power, food will last longer. Keep a thermometer in the refrigerator to be able to check the food temperature when the power is restored.
    • Turn on your TV/radio, or check your city/county website every 30 minutes in order to get the latest weather updates and emergency instructions.

    Survive DURING a Hurricane

    • If told to evacuate, do so immediately. Do not drive around barricades.
    • If sheltering during high winds, go to a FEMA safe room, ICC 500 storm shelter, or a small, interior, windowless room or hallway on the lowest floor that is not subject to flooding.
    • If trapped in a building by flooding, go to the highest level of the building. Do not climb into a closed attic. You may become trapped by rising flood water.
    • Listen for current emergency information and instructions.
    • Use a generator or other gasoline-powered machinery outdoors ONLY and away from windows.
    • Do not walk, swim, or drive through flood waters. Turn Around. Don’t Drown! Just six inches of fast-moving water can knock you down, and one foot of moving water can sweep your vehicle away.
    • Stay off of bridges over fast-moving water.

    Be Safe AFTER a Hurricane

    • Listen to authorities for information and special instructions.
    • Be careful during clean-up. Wear protective clothing and work with someone else.
    • Do not touch electrical equipment if it is wet or if you are standing in water. If it is safe to do so, turn off electricity at the main breaker or fuse box to prevent electric shock.
    • Avoid wading in flood water, which can contain dangerous debris. Underground or downed power lines can also electrically charge the water.
    • Save phone calls for emergencies. Phone systems are often down or busy after a disaster. Use text messages or social media to communicate with family and friends.
    • Document any property damage with photographs. Contact your insurance company for assistance.

    READ MORE
    Hurricane & Other Preparedness
    FEMA Prepares for Hurricanes and so are we!
    It’s Time to Prepare for Hurricane Season

  • Stay Alert: Nationwide Emergency Test on October 3


    Be Aware of the Nationwide Emergency Test

    UPDATE: Due to the response of Hurricane Florence, the nationwide test of the Emergency Alert System (EAS) and Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) has been postponed until October 3rd.

    On Wednesday, October 3, 2018, the Federal Emergency and Management Agency (FEMA) and the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) will conduct a nationwide test of the Emergency Alert System (EAS) and Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) beginning at 2:18 p.m. ET. The test will assess how ready the distribution channels are in case a national message needs sending and determine whether improvements are needed.

    READ MORE

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