ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard Minimum Requirements  Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies - Buy new ANSI Kits
ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard Minimum Requirements Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies - Buy new ANSI Kits

First-Aid-Product.com: First Aid Articles & Information

  • Treatment of a Fractured Bone

    • Image of splint on a fractured limbIf the fracture is severe and the bone is protruding from the skin, call 9-1-1 or EMS immediately and wait for Emergency Medical Personnel to arrive.
    • Do not move the casualty unless they are in immediate danger. If he/she has to be moved, apply a splint before moving the casualty.
    • Leave the fractured limb in the position in which you found it. Do not try to straighten the limb! The splint should be applied in the position of the limb.
    • Place an ice pack on the injured area for up to 20 minutes. Place a cloth between the skin and ice.
    • Applying Splints:
      1. A splint should be long enough to extend beyond the injured joint or bone. The splint should extend above and below the fracture point.
      2. Any firm or rigid material can be used for splinting, such as wood, tongue depressor, cardboard, folded magazines, or newspaper.
      3. Use towels, clothing, or other soft material to cushion the area to prevent further injury.
      4. Support and fasten the splints with bandages or cloths at a minimum of three areas:
        • Below the joint; below the break.
        • Above the joint; above the break.
        • At the level of the break; but not directly on the injury.
    • Broken bones in the hands or feet can be immobilized by gently wrapping a pillow or blanket around them to protect from further injury.
    • Apply pressure with a sterile dressing to control any serious bleeding.

    Also read: How to Detect a Bone Fracture

    Content excerpted from the Urgent First Aid Guide used by permission Copyright 2013 UrgentFirstAid.com
    All Rights Reserved. Get a full copy of the First Aid Guide for under $1!

    Learn the Signs, Symptoms and Treatment of Musculoskeletal Injuries in a case where head, neck or spinal injury is suspected. Find out about LIVE OSHA Standard First Aid & Emergency Care at your location... check out American CPR Training™

  • How to Detect a Bone Fracture

    Image of hand bones with fractured bone highlighted in redA fracture is a break or chip in the bone. A fracture should be suspected if the body part does not have a normal appearance or function. A fracture is usually accompanied by pain, swelling, and discoloration of the injured area. The main objective of first aid treatment for broken bones is to prevent further injury.

    There are two main types of fractures:

    • Closed Fracture – the bone is broken but the skin has not been punctured.
    • Open Fracture – the skin is broken and the broken bone protrudes from the wound.

    Content excerpted from the Urgent First Aid Guide used by permission Copyright 2013 UrgentFirstAid.com
    All Rights Reserved. Get a full copy of the First Aid Guide for under $1!

    Learn the Signs, Symptoms and Treatment of Musculoskeletal Injuries in a case where head, neck or spinal injury is suspected. Find out about LIVE OSHA Standard First Aid & Emergency Care at your location... check out American CPR Training™

  • General Burn First Aid Information

    Image of burned skin on arm being rinsed with cold water

    • Burns can result from heat (thermal burn), electricity, or exposure to chemicals.
    • The majority of burns should be seen by a doctor. Some first-degree burns, such as mild sun burn, can be treated without doctor care.
    • Never apply home remedies such as butter or baking soda to a burn. Many ointments and home remedies applied topically actually trap the heat, causing further damage to the burned area and can lead to infection.
    • First Aid treatment for burns should focus on keeping the burned area clean, preventing and/or treatment for shock, and pain control.
    • Severe burns (second and third degree burns) often lead to shock. Shock is a life-threatening condition and should be addressed immediately. Call 9-1-1 if you suspect the casualty is experiencing shock.
      1. Symptoms of shock include cold, clammy skin, pale or grey skin color, nausea, vomiting, and/or shallow, rapid breathing.

    Content excerpted from the Urgent First Aid Guide used by permission Copyright 2013 UrgentFirstAid.com
    All Rights Reserved. Get a full copy of the First Aid Guide for under $1!

  • Mitigation-Preparedness-Response-Recovery

    The Emergency Management Cycle... What is it?

    The first national movements toward preparedness began during World War II - not when we entered the war, but actually beforehand. There was great fear of attack upon our homeland, with the greatest concern being the California & Oregon Coasts, and the Eastern Seaboard (although as it turned out, Germany was trying to coerce our long-time ally Mexico into opening that frontier to them for attack.)

    For a long time after World War II, decades in fact, emergency management focused primarily on preparedness. Governmentally, this generally involved preparing for enemy attack. More recently communities have looked at preparedness for all disasters, including identifying resources and expertise in advance, and planning how these can be used in a disaster.  Local government and social committees, Fire Departments, and CERT (Community Emergency Response Teams) have played a big part in this.

    While we offer a broad range of supplies and information for preparedness at First-aid-product.com, it is vital that businesses, groups, and community leaders realize that preparedness is only one phase of four crucial steps in emergency management.

    There are four phases of emergency management:

    1. Mitigation (aka Prevention)
      Preventing future emergencies or minimizing their effects. The first phase in emergency management is Prevention or Mitigation.Mitigation is taking action to eliminate or reduce the loss of life and property damage related to an event or crisis, particularly those that cannot be prevented.

      • Buying flood and fire insurance for your home is a mitigation activity.
      • Mitigation activities take place before and after emergencies.
        Prevention is acting to decrease the likelihood that an event or crisis will occur.
      • Includes any activities that prevent an emergency, reduce the chance of an
        emergency happening, or reduce the damaging effects of unavoidable emergencies.
      • Strapping a water heater to avoid it toppling over in an earthquake is an act of prevention.
        Both Mitigation and Prevention activities take place before and after emergencies.
    2. Preparedness
      Preparing to handle an emergency. Preparedness includes making plans or procedures intended to save lives and to minimize damage when an emergency occurs. Planning, training, and exercising are critical elements of preparedness. These steps ensure that when a disaster strikes, emergency responders will have the plans and practice necessary to provide the best response possible.Remember that preparedness is not limited to the emergency response community.  Everyone should take steps to ensure personal preparedness for emergencies and disasters; at work, school, home, and even when on the road or traveling.Preparedness activities may include:

      • Plans or preparations made to save lives and to help response and rescue
        operations.
      • Evacuation plans and stocking food and water are both examples of preparedness.
      • Developing all-hazard policies, procedures, and protocols with input from key community partners such as law enforcement, medical services, fire services, and even mental health.
      • Establishing an incident command system (ICS) for organizing personnel and services to respond in the event of an emergency.
      • Preparedness activities take place before an emergency occurs.
    3. Response
      Responding safely to an emergency. An Emergency Operations Plan provides the framework by which any organization or group will respond to and manage emergency incidents.The primary objectives of Emergency Operations Plans are to apply all available resources to:
      Preserve of human life
      Protect property
      Protect the environment
      Facilitate continuity of operations

      • Response is putting your preparedness plans into action.
      • Seeking shelter from a tornado or turning off gas valves in an earthquake are both
        response activities.
      • Response activities take place during an emergency.
    4. Recovery
      Recovering from an emergency. Continuity of Operations is an effort to ensure that Essential Functions continue to be performed during and after a wide range of emergencies, including localized acts of nature, accidents and related emergencies.Recovery is an ongoing process. The type and breadth of recovery activities will vary based on the nature and scope of the emergency. However, the goal of the recovery phase is to restore the community, business, and the environment. Planning for Recovery begins in the Preparedness phase, and requires support from government, community, and each individual.Recovery includes:
      Physical and Structural Recovery
      Business Recovery
      Restoration of the Environment
      Psychological and Emotional Recovery

      • Includes actions taken to return to a normal or an even safer situation following an
        emergency.
      • Recovery includes getting financial assistance to help pay for the repairs.
      • Recovery activities take place after an emergency.

    emergency-management-cycle

     

    The Four Phases of Emergency Management

    MitigationPreventing future emergencies or minimizing their effects
    • Includes any activities that prevent an emergency, reduce the chance of an emergency happening, or reduce the damaging effects of unavoidable emergencies.
    • Buying flood and fire insurance for your home is a mitigation activity.
    • Mitigation activities take place before and after emergencies.
    PreparednessPreparing to handle an emergency
    • Includes plans or preparations made to save lives and to help response and rescue operations.
    • Evacuation plans and stocking food and water are both examples of preparedness.
    • Preparedness activities take place before an emergency occurs.
    ResponseResponding safely to an emergency
    • Includes actions taken to save lives and prevent further property damage in an emergency situation. Response is putting your preparedness plans into action.
    • Seeking shelter from a tornado or turning off gas valves in an earthquake are both response activities.
    • Response activities take place during an emergency.
    RecoveryRecovering from an emergency
    • Includes actions taken to return to a normal or an even safer situation following an emergency.
    • Recovery includes getting financial assistance to help pay for the repairs.
    • Recovery activities take place after an emergency.
  • Syrup of Ipecac

    First-Aid-Product.com recommends that you contact the Poison Control Center before use of this product... If you have any, it is probably expired - also, it is RARELY recommended any longer.

    NCPC_header_740x89


    From Wikipedia: (Information is provided for informational purposes only, and implies to endorsement, nor statement of veracity by Express Companies, Inc, or any of its affiliates)

    Syrup of ipecac (derived from the dried rhizome and roots of the Ipecacuanha plant), is an emetic—a substance used to induce vomiting. It is used in cases of accidental poisoning, and is perhaps the best-known emetic. Ipecac was also used in cough mixtures as an expectorant and from the 18th until the early 20th century, Ipecac and opium were used to produce Dover's powder, which was used in syrup form.

    Use

    Though it has a long history of use, not only in the US but in other countries too, syrup of Ipecac has come under recent scrutiny.

    One recent scientific review (2005) by an expert panel concluded that vomiting alone does not reliably remove poisons from the stomach. The study suggested that indications for use of Ipecac syrup were rare and patients should be treated by more effective and safer means. Additionally, Ipecac’s potential side effects, such as lethargy, can be confused with the poison’s effects, complicating diagnosis. Ipecac may also delay the administration or reduce the effectiveness of other treatments such as activated charcoal, whole bowel irrigation, or oral antidotes. The current first-line treatment for most ingested poisons is now activated charcoal, which operates much more quickly and effectively than Ipecac treatment.

    Although Ipecac was once recommended by pediatricians to be kept in the home, the current guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends against keeping syrup of Ipecac in the home and in fact recommends disposal of any syrup of Ipecac present in the home.

    The reason for this new policy was:

    1. There was no evidence that syrup of Ipecac actually helps improve the outcome in cases of poisoning
    2. Administering syrup of Ipecac can delay administering more effective treatments, such as activated charcoal and/or antidotes
    3. Syrup of Ipecac can change neurologic status, and so the effects of the Ipecac can be mistaken for the effects of the poisoning
    4. Accidental overdose of Ipecac can result when administered in the home
    5. Universal availability of Ipecac in the home may have contributed to Ipecac abuse by bulimics and intentional misuse of Ipecac in cases of Munchausen syndrome by proxy.

    Mechanism of action

    The actions of Ipecac are mainly those of its major alkaloids, emetine (methylcephalin) and cephalin. They both act locally by irritating the gastric mucosa and centrally by stimulating the medullary chemoreceptor trigger zone to induce vomiting.

    Abuse

    Ipecac has been used by individuals with bulimia nervosa as a means to achieve weight loss. Repeated abuse is believed to cause damage to the heart, which can ultimately result in the user's death. The death of singer Karen Carpenter in 1983 has been popularly attributed to her abuse of Ipecac for weight control.

    From the Poison Control Center:

    What is Ipecac Syrup?

    Ipecac syrup is a medicine that causes vomiting. In the past it was used to partially empty a person’s stomach after a poison. It is now rarely recommended.

    It is NOT necessary to keep ipecac syrup in your home.

    In case of poisoning, call the poison center right away at.......
    .800redmed

    What Happened to Ipecac Syrup?

    For years, parents were told to keep ipecac syrup at home. This medicine could be used to make a child vomit after swallowing poison. Now, your doctor doesn’t tell you to keep it. The poison center doesn’t tell you to use it. You can’t even buy ipecac in the drugstore.

    What happened? And NOW what should you do?

    The short story: Call the poison center right away at 1-800-222-1222 if you think someone has been poisoned. If the poison was swallowed, breathed in, or splashed on someone’s skin or eyes, the poison center experts will tell you what to do right away. Local experts will answer your phone call, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Most of the time, you can stay safely at home with the poison center’s advice. But, be prepared:

    • Click here to order phone stickers and magnets with the poison center’s emergency number.
    • Click here for first aid instructions for poisoning.

    The longer story: It seemed to make sense. If someone swallowed poison and then threw up, they shouldn’t get sick. This treatment approach was used for decades.

    At first, people who swallowed poison were given many ineffective remedies:

    • raw egg white;
    • mustard;
    • the "universal antidote" of burnt toast, tannic acid and mild of magnesia;
    • salt water;
    • tickling the back of the throat.

    Sometimes, these remedies did cause vomiting. But they often caused problems of their own. For example, too much salt caused sodium poisoning, seizures and even death. Gagging someone often caused throat bleeding and swelling. Also, these home remedies were never reliable enough to be used to treat poisoning.  And complicated charts about what remedy went with what poisoning were confusing.

    Small brown bottles of ipecac syrup seemed to solve these problems. When given to children or adults, ipecac made most of them throw up within 20-30 minutes. Since at least the 1960’s, standard parenting advice included keeping a bottle of ipecac syrup at home. In fact, many pediatricians and health clinics gave ipecac to parents, “just in case”.

    What we know now: It turns out that a big piece of the picture was missing. Yes, ipecac made people throw up, whether or not they swallowed poison. But did throwing up keep them from actually getting sick from the poison?

    Recently, researchers looked at all of the evidence about ipecac syrup. They agreed that ipecac syrup reliably caused vomiting. They also agreed that this didn’t make any difference! In other words, there was little research to show that people who swallowed ipecac after poisoning did any better than others.

    In addition, this review highlighted some problems with ipecac:

    • There are times when ipecac is unsafe.  It shouldn't be given to someone who swallowed chemicals that cause burns on contact or medicines that can cause seizures very quickly.  It can be dangerous to people with some types of medical problems.  When such poisoning victims got ipecac anyway, they developed serious complications or even died.
    • More and more people with eating disorders were using ipecac to make themselves throw up.  Regular use of ipecac syrup is dangerous; for example, chronic users have died from heart problems.
    • Sometimes people vomiting after ipecac could not keep down other drugs they needed to treat their poisonings.

    Based on these facts, pediatricians, poison centers, and federal regulators have re-evaluated the use of ipecac. Follow the links at the end for the fine print.

    Should you keep ipecac at home?

    • The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that ipecac syrup NOT be stocked at home.
    • Likewise, the American Association of Poison Control Centers no longer recommends that parents keep ipecac syrup at home.
    • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is considering a recommendation from one of its expert panels to make ipecac syrup a prescription-only drug.  To date, FDA has not acted on the panel recommendation.
    • In the Washington, DC metropolitan area, the National Capital Poison Center does not recommend that parents stock ipecac syrup at home.  In fact, most pharmacies no longer stock ipecac syrup.

    I hear about activated charcoal… Activated charcoal is a medicine that is used to treat some serious poisonings. It is often given in emergency departments and sometimes, but rarely, at home.

    The National Capital Poison Center does NOT recommend that parents keep activated charcoal at home. It goes back to research. Most studies do not show a benefit to keeping and giving activated charcoal at home.

    The bottom line: Parents, child care providers, and everyone who spends time with children should post the poison center phone number on or near every phone. Call 1-800-222-1222 right away for a possible poisoning. Trained experts will guide you: if treatment is needed, they’ll tell you what to do. They will call you back to be sure that everything is all right.

    For more information:

    • In 2003, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration FDA Nonprescription Drug Advisory Council held a hearing about the over-the-counter status of ipecac syrup.  The advisory panel then recommended to FDA that ipecac syrup no longer be available as a non-prescription drug.  FDA has not made a decision (as of 12/05), but documents from the hearing are available on the web site.  Go to www.fda.gov and enter the search term "ipecac".  You will find the regulatory history of ipecac and presentations and submissions for and against the over-the-counter availability of ipecac syrup.
    • In 2003, the American Academy of Pediatrics issued a policy statement "Poison Treatment in the Home" which concluded that ipecac syrup should no longer be routinely used in the home.  Instead, they recommended that the first action of a caregiver of a child who may have swallowed a poison is to call the local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222.
    • In 2004, an expert panel of toxicologists issued its "Guideline on the Use of Ipecac Syrup in the Out-of-Hospital Management of Ingested Poisons."  Panel members from the American Association of Poison Control Centers, the American Academy of Clinical Toxicology and the American College of Medical Toxicology concluded that ipecac is rarely useful in treating childhood poisoning.
  • Welcome to Our First Aid Information Blog

    Thank you for visiting our FirstAidProduct.com Blog. Our articles are focused on delivering First Aid and Safety news to all types of first responders from emergency medics to house hold family members. Our network of Americas leading first aid, CPR, safety supply, and disaster & survival gear experts allow us to facilitate the latest up to date information regarding these topics and provide this news straight to our visitors. We consistently hand over news, stories, testimonials, product reviews and much more. If you want to stay on top of first aid news you will find it here. We discuss a wide variety of topics such as OSHA SmartCompliance, disaster survival gear, consumer first aid products, sports medicine & first aid, auto emergency first aid tips, burn treatment first aid & instruction, kids first aid, CPR, AED's first aid for pets, eye washes & eye safety, hearing safety, first responder gear, bloodborne pathogens, OSHA safety training, first aid bandages & wound care, camping / outdoor safety & survival, first aid antiseptics & ointments, first aid medications & tablets, and much more!

  • Evalúe, Avise y Asista

    Evalúe / Revise la escena

    La evaluación de una escena sólo toma unos 5-15 segundos, aunque hay una serie de preguntas importantes que deben ser tomados en cuenta durante este breve período.

    Revise el área para posible peligros o riesgos! Determine si hay algún riesgo en el medio ambiente que represente un peligro para usted como un rescatador. Si una escena no fuera de peligro, no se acerque. Si el área no está segura, mantenga su distancia y llame al 911. Hay que tener esto en cuenta cuando se trata sobre todo de emergencias relacionadas con los espacios encerrados, incendios, cables electricos sueltos, derrames de productos químicos, y otras situaciones en el cuales el socorrista puede convertirse en otra víctima. Durante esta fase también se debe tratar de determinar el número de víctimas, la naturaleza de las lesiones, y la causa de las lesiónes.

  • Alerta SMU / Llama al 911

    Una vez que se haya determinado que hay una emergencia, es hora de alertar al Servicio Medico de Urgencias(SMU). Si es posible, consiga ayuda de otra gente para que pueda comenzar la atención a la víctima. Pida a la otra persona que active el servicio de SMU, llamando al 911, o si nadie está disponible para ayudar; el rescatador debe hacer la llamada el mismo. Trate de hablar con calma e incluir información importante como la ubicación, número de teléfono, y la condición de la víctima. Permanezca en la línea con el operador del 911.

    Si el rescatador sospecha que la víctima está experimentando una emergencia cardiaca, el rescatador debe pedir que otra persona vaya y traiga un botiquín de Primeros Auxilios y un DEA si esta disponible.

  • Asista/ Evaluación Primaria

    Las primeras cosas que se deben buscar son condiciones que pueden amenazar la vida de una victima. El rescatador debe comenzar el tratamiento y la evaluación, hablando con la víctima si está consciente. Los rescatistas luego querrán controlar el sangrado severo y dar tratamiento para shock o ver si hay otras lesiones o enfermedades graves.

    Verifique si hay respuesta

    (Golpecitos y grite ~ "¿Estás bien?") Si no hay señales obvias de respuesta como movimiento, hablar, toser o respiración - o si sólo hay respiración con dificultad, entonces se requiere acción inmediata! Si la víctima no responde, entonces se requiere cuidado completo de RCP C.A.R.E™ o RCP con compresiones solamente.

    Evaluación Primaria

    Si hay más que una víctima, un rescatador debe referirse a la sección de triage de evaluación y asistencia. Evalúe si hay confusión o falta de reacción. Si la víctima ha estado inconsciente por el tiempo que sea, inmovilice la cabeza y el cuello, y active SMU inmediatamente. Lleve a cabo una evaluación de pies a cabeza. Busque rastros de golpes, hemorragia, deformidad, objetos atravesado o ensartado, decoloración o cualquier otra cosa que pueda ser motivo de preocupación. Asegúrese de localizar cualquier lesión oculta que esta pueden ser mas peligrosas

    que las lesiones obvias que se ven a primera vista. Para determinar si un individuo tiene una fractura un rescatador, simplemente puede pedirle a la víctima si puede mover el área sin causar dolor. Si la víctima es incapaz de moverlo o si le causa mucho dolor, no le permita moverlo, y trátelo como si fuera una fractura.

    Para poder decidir a quien atender primero, un rescatador debe estar constantemente atento a las situaciones que ponen en más peligro la vida. Esto se vuelve aún más importante cuando se trata de una víctima inconsciente que no puede darle información al rescatador. Puede ser necesario que el rescatador considere las siguientes preguntas:

    Prioridades Que Ponen En Peligro La Vida

    1. ¿Reacciona la víctima? Si no hay señales obvias de respuesta como movimiento, hablar, toser o respiración - o si sólo hay respiración con dificultad o insuficiente, entonces se requiere acción inmediata! Si la víctima está consciente y hablando, entonces es evidente que la víctima está respirando y tiene latido de corazón.
    2. ¿Hay sangrado abundante? Vea la sección de control de sangrado para el tratamiento específico
    3. ¿Esta en Shock? Vea la sección de shock para el tratamiento específico. Estos elementos deben ser tratados segun su gravedad. Por ejemplo, aunque cualquiera de estas situaciones puede causar la muerte, el sangrado grave no debe tratarse hasta que el Paso 1 (falta de respuesta que puede incluir respiración y latidos del corazón), haya sido remediada, ya que estas son amenazas más inmediatas a la vida.

    Evaluación Secundaria

    Un rescatador debe realizar un evaluación secundaria una vez que se ha determinado que la víctima no tiene lesiones que amenazen su vida o condiciones que requieran atención continua. La evaluación secundaria es para buscar problemas menos obvios que requieren de primeros auxilios. La evaluación secundaria sigue estos pasos:

    1. Hay que hablar con la víctima y / o espectadores. Infórmese sobre alergias, condiciones médicas y el uso de cualquier medicamento.
    2. Checar los signos vitales. Revise el nivel de conciencia y lucidez mental. La respiración y el pulso deben estar normal.
    3. Lleve a cabo una evaluación de pies a cabeza. No los mueva si sospecha que hay una lesión a un músculo, hueso, cabeza o en la columna.
    4. Revise si la temperatura de la víctima es normal con la parte trasera de la mano del rescatador.
    5. Si la víctima no tiene ningún dolor de cuello, pídele a la víctima que mueva su cabeza hacia atrás y adelante y de lado a lado para buscar lesiones.
    6. Revise la nariz, oídos y boca para sangre o otros fluidos.
    7. Para revisar los hombros pidale a la víctima que suba y bajé los hombros
    8. Para revisar el abdomen y el pecho para ver si hay lesiones internas pidale a la víctima que respire profundamente.
    9. Para revisar si hay otras lesiones en los brazos y las piernas de la víctima pidale que los muevan poco a poco.

    Continúe vigilando a la víctima para ver si pierde el conocimiento. La condición del herido puede empeorar de repente, por lo que es importante que siga atento a los cambios y estar preparado para realizar RCP en caso que sea necesario.

  • Descanse y Tranquilice

    Mientras que el rescatista espera para que llegue el Servicio Medico de Urgencias, debe de tener a la víctima descansando cómodamente y estarle asegurando con calma que la ayuda está en camino. Este puede ser uno de la actos más importantes que un rescatador puede hacer para ayudar a la víctima. Si el rescatista puede mantener a la víctima tranquila y cómoda, es posible que se pueda evitar que entre en shock o que entren en shock aun mas severo. Esto puede poner en peligro la vida de la víctima.

    Patógenos Transmitidas por la Sangre y las Precauciones Universales Parte de la evaluación de la escena incluye buscar los riesgos asociados con la exposición a materiales infecciosos. Esto incluye el usar el equipo de protección personal.

    Debido al riesgo de patógenos transmitidos por la sangre, los individuos que dan RCP o que ayudan dando Primeros auxilios deben seguir las reglas de precauciones universales, establecidas por OSHA y el Departamento de Labor de los EE.UU:

    1. Evite el contacto con sangre o fluidos corporales de la víctima lesionada mientras esta ayudando.
    2. Cuando sea posible, utilice guantes sin látex, o algún otro tipo de guantes, boquillas de RCP y otros artículos pertinentes de Protección Personal
    3. Lavese las manos, y cualquier área expuesta con jabón y agua tibia inmediatamente despues de ayudar con Primeros Auxilios.
    4. Inmediatamente Reporte cualquier incidente en el que pense que se haya sido expuesto para recibir atención medica y una evaluacion.

    La base detrás de las Precauciones Universales es que puede ser difícil o imposible determinar si un individuo puede tener una enfermedad infecciosa.

    Con esto en mente, es importante tratar a TODAS las víctimas como si supiera que estan infectados. Precauciones universales significa usar el equipo de protección personal, proceder con precacion durante el tratamiento, la limpieza adecuada, y el reporte de la informacion debe ser SIEMPRE, Y CON TODOS.

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