ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard Minimum Requirements  Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies - Buy new ANSI Kits
ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard Minimum Requirements Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies - Buy new ANSI Kits

ANSI

  • You may THINK your first aid kit is compliant...

    So you THINK your first aid kit is compliant...

    Think again.

    When OSHA comes calling, they usually check your first aid kit or cabinet.
    You may have ordered an OSHA & ANSI compliant kit, but is it really compliant? The Inspector will know if not. Some things to consider:

    1) Most common off-the-shelf non-compliance: The vast majority of “ANSI Compliant” first aid kits and cabinets on the market do not contain a current/compliant first aid guide… the Manufacturers claim the kits are up to date, but frankly, there are very few guides available to kit builders that have the required ANSI content in them.

    ANSI REQUIRES that your first aid guide covers (at minimum):

    • Emergency steps of assessing the scene and person, calling 9-1-1 or location emergency number
    • Establishing responsiveness
    • Establishing and maintaining an open and clear airway
    • Performing rescue breathing
    • Treating airway obstruction in a conscious victim
    • Performing CPR
    • Using an AED
    • Recognizing the signs and symptoms of shock and providing first aid for shock from illness or injury
    • Assessing and treating a victim who has an unexplained change in level of consciousness or sudden illness
    • Controlling bleeding with direct pressure
    • Poisoning
    • Responding to medical emergencies
      • Chest pain
      • Stroke
      • Breathing problems
      • Anaphylactic reaction
      • Hypoglycemia in diabetics taking insulin
      • Seizures
      • Reduced level of consciousness
      • Impaled object
    • Wounds
      • Assessment and treatment of first aid wounds including abrasions, cuts, lacerations, punctures, avulsions, amputations and crush injuries
      • Principles of wound care including infection precautions
      • Principles of body substance isolation, universal precautions, and use of PPE
    • Burns
      • Assessment of the severity of a burn, including extent (size) and depth
      • Recognizing whether a burn is thermal, electrical, or chemical and the appropriate first aid
    • Temperature extremes
      • Exposure to cold, including frostbite and hypothermia
      • Exposure to heat, including heat cramps, heat exhaustion, and heat stroke
    • Musculoskeletal injuries
      • Fractures
      • Sprains, strains, contusions, and cramps
      • Head, neck, back, and spinal injuries
    • Eye injuries
    • Mouth and teeth injuries
      • Oral injuries, lip and tongue injuries, broken and missing teeth
    • Bites and stings
      • Human and animal bites
      • Bites and stings from insects; instruction in first aid treatment for anaphylacsis

    Replace your first aid guide with a fully OSHA & ANSI compliant guide for $1.50 (as low as 68¢ each!)

    2) Second most common non-compliance: Missing Items. If you bought a first aid kit or cabinet to comply with the latest requirements you need to make sure it has the minimum fill at all times!

    3) Third most common non-compliance: Wrong Class kit. Do you need Class A or Class B?
    The 2015 ANSI revision introduced two classes of first aid kits:
    Class A kits with content designed to deal with most common types of workplace injuries.
    Class B kits with a broader range and quantity of supplies to deal with injuries more complex or in high-risk environments.
    Don’t skimp – if “borderline” or unsure – go for Class B.
    In deciding which class of kit is more appropriate for a given workplace... employers should consider the risks and task load of the work environment and the potential severity and likelihood of occurrence of an injury. Employers should also consider whether multiple first aid kits are needed, based on the number of employees, physical layout of the work environment, and the remoteness of the worksite to emergency services. These same considerations can be taken into account when determining if a first aid kit should be augmented with additional supplies.

    Want to learn more? Read about OSHA First Aid vs. ANSI First Aid.

  • ?8 elements to a compliant, effective first-aid program

    Great article from the Business Journal!

    A quick response is necessary when there is an injury or sudden illness. Getty Images (SolStock) A quick response is necessary when there is an injury or sudden illness. Getty Images (SolStock)

    Minutes count when someone is injured or becomes ill on the job. You can keep the situation from getting worse by providing the right type of first-aid treatment right away.

    Anyone who has been designated by an employer to provide first aid must have thorough training on how to respond to the injuries and illnesses anticipated in the workplace. Employees who are not designated first-aiders should know how to promptly report injuries and illnesses. Here are eight elements that can be used as a general introduction to first-aid programs.

    1. Introduce OSHA’s expectations for first-aid programs

    Where an accident is possible based on hazards and can result in suffocation, severe bleeding or other life-threatening or permanently disabling injury or illness, OSHA expects a three- to four-minute response time from the time of injury to the time of administering first aid. If such a life-threatening or serious injury is unlikely, OSHA allows a longer response time, such as 15 minutes.

    To ensure treatment is available within these time frames, OSHA requires the employer to train persons to render first aid when there’s no nearby hospital, clinic or infirmary that’s used to treat all injured or ill employees.

    First-aid providers perform the initial assessment of injuries and illnesses and provide immediate care and life support before emergency medical service (EMS) professionals arrive.

    2. Display your first-aid supplies

    First-aid supplies must be readily available in an emergency. There must be appropriate supplies (in adequate amounts) for the types of injuries and illnesses that are likely to occur based on an understanding of the activities in the workplace.

    OSHA says that medical personnel must be available to consult with the employer on matters of plant health. Employers can work with the medical professionals who treat injured employees to get help in determining what supplies should be in the facility’s first-aid kits and how many kits are needed.

    As guidance, employers can consult American National Standards Institute standard Z308.1, Minimum Requirements for Workplace First Aid Kits. It describes two classes of basic kits.

    The Class A kit contains the following:

    • Adhesive bandages, 1 inch x 3 inch
    • Adhesive tape, 2.5 yards
    • Antibiotic ointment
    • Antiseptic
    • Breathing barrier
    • Gel-soaked burn dressing
    • Burn ointment
    • Cold pack
    • Eye covering with a means of attachment
    • Eye/skin wash
    • First-aid guide
    • Hand sanitizer
    • Medical examination gloves
    • Roller bandage, 2 inches
    • Scissors
    • Sterile pad, 3 inches x 3 inches
    • Trauma pad, 5 inches x 9 inches
    • Triangular bandage

    The Class B kit contains a larger quantity of all of the items listed in the Class A kit, and also includes:

    • Roller bandage, 4 inches
    • Splint
    • Tourniquet

    3. Emphasize the importance of first-aiders taking universal precautions to prevent exposure to bloodborne pathogens

    Blood can carry microorganisms such as hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that can cause serious diseases. OSHA’s bloodborne pathogens standard, 1910.1030, applies to all “occupational exposure” to blood or other potentially infectious materials (OPIMs). Employees who are expected to provide first aid as part of their job duties are covered by the standard.

    When a first-aid response involves exposure to blood and OPIMs, first-aiders must use “universal precautions.” This is an approach to infection control where all human blood and certain body fluids are treated as if they were known to be infectious for bloodborne pathogens. Wearing rubber exam gloves and protective clothing is part of following universal precautions.

    4. Explain how first-aid providers start by assessing the situation

    When first-aid providers arrive at an accident scene, they first evaluate what happened, how many people are injured, and whether it’s safe to enter the area. In serious situations, they’ll make sure EMS professionals are on the way.

    First-aiders must ensure their own safety before they can help the injured. They’ll consider everyone’s safety when they decide on making rescues and moving victims. They’ll assess the injuries of each victim. They’ll check for responsiveness, breathing, and circulation; and they’ll look for any medical alert tags a victim might be wearing.

    5. Outline first-aid response to life-threatening emergencies

    Life-threatening medical emergencies can involve conditions such as:

    • Chest pain
    • Stroke
    • Breathing problems
    • Allergic reactions
    • Seizures
    • Severe bleeding

    If an injury is life-threatening, first-aid providers are trained to:

    • Perform rescue breathing, perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation ( CPR), and use an automated external defibrillator ( AED)
    • Recognize the signs and symptoms of shock and provide treatment
    • Control bleeding with direct pressure
    • Provide other treatment to stabilize the victim

    6. Discuss AED programs

    OSHA’s Best Practices Guide: Fundamentals of a Workplace First-Aid Program says that an AED should be considered when selecting first-aid supplies.

    AEDs provide the critical and necessary treatment for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) caused by ventricular fibrillation. Ventricular fibrillation is the uncoordinated beating of the heart leading to collapse and death. An electric shock delivered by an AED can restore the heart to a normal rhythm. Using an AED within three to four minutes after the victim has suffered SCA significantly improves the survival rate.

    Administer CPR until the AED unit is brought to the victim. This basic form of life support uses chest compressions and artificial respiration.

    7. Outline some non-life-threatening emergencies encountered by first-aid providers

    First-aid providers know how to provide initial treatment for conditions such as:

    • Cuts, abrasions, puncture wounds, crushing injuries, and other wounds
    • Burns
    • Frostbite, hypothermia, heat stroke, and other temperature-related conditions
    • Sprains and strains
    • Eye injuries

    Even though these conditions may not be life-threatening, the victim may still need medical treatment beyond first aid.

    8. Summarize your program

    Every employee needs to know how to report a medical emergency. A quick response is necessary when there is an injury or sudden illness. However, the response needs to be made by personnel who have proper training.

    Judie Smithers is an editor at J. J. Keller & Associates, a compliance resource company that offers products and services to business professionals. Smithers’ subject matter expertise covers safety training, lockout/tagout, permit-required confined spaces, hearing conservation, exposure monitoring, personal protective equipment, asbestos, lead, radiation, and illumination. Previously, Smithers was the health and safety information coordinator for an industrial company.

  • The $19.99 solution to OSHA & ANSI First Aid Kit Compliance

    When ANSI rolled out the new Minimum Requirements for Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies, twice, in 2014 & 2015 - which went into effect June 2016...people worried.

    The new standards require substantially more first aid content for workplace first aid kits. Logically, this means much higher prices for business first aid kits...

    Luckily, there is an affordable solution. Businesses with 25 or fewer employees, and "typical" workplace activities can easily comply with the Urgent First Aid™ Basic ANSI first Aid kit for $19.99 (or less) - general work environments with more than 25 employees and guests on premises can place multiple units for easy access .

    Worried about ANSI and OSHA requirements? This is our most affordable complete ANSI/OSHA first aid kit! Made right here in the USA, this Urgent First Aid kit is our best value plastic ANSI Class A first aid kit. It meets or exceeds the most recent OSHA and ANSI 2015 Standard fill requirements, with contents designed to deal with most common types of workplace injuries so you know you and your employees will be covered with the new ANSI 2015 requirements. Under the new ANSI Standard Minimum Requirements for Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies guidelines, general requirements include the following items: Adhesive bandages, adhesive tape, antibiotic application, antiseptic, a breathing barrier, burn dressing (gel soaked), burn treatment, cold packs, eye covering, eye/skin wash, first aid guide, hand sanitizer, medical exam gloves, roller bandages, scissors, sterile pads, trauma pads, and triangular bandages. In addition the location of the kit must be easily accessible. This ANSI Class A first aid kit is great for small offices and general workplaces of up to 25 people, it is easily wall mounted, and can also be quickly removed to be taken to the accident scene. Worried about ANSI and OSHA requirements? This is our most affordable complete ANSI/OSHA first aid kit! Made right here in the USA, this Urgent First Aid kit is our best value plastic ANSI Class A first aid kit. It meets or exceeds the most recent OSHA and ANSI 2015 Standard fill requirements, with contents designed to deal with most common types of workplace injuries so you know you and your employees will be covered with the new ANSI 2015 requirements. Under the new ANSI Standard Minimum Requirements for Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies guidelines, general requirements include the following items: Adhesive bandages, adhesive tape, antibiotic application, antiseptic, a breathing barrier, burn dressing (gel soaked), burn treatment, cold packs, eye covering, eye/skin wash, first aid guide, hand sanitizer, medical exam gloves, roller bandages, scissors, sterile pads, trauma pads, and triangular bandages. In addition the location of the kit must be easily accessible. This ANSI Class A first aid kit is great for small offices and general workplaces of up to 25 people, it is easily wall mounted, and can also be quickly removed to be taken to the accident scene.

    ANSI decided to establish two classes of specific first aid kits,  Class A and Class B. These kits have been classified into four kit case types as well - depending on the work setting and ensuring that each kit contained both a variety and an adequate supply of the essential items needed to deal with the most common types of injuries and/or illnesses that could occur at a workplace.

    Class A kits are considered more basic for most general settings.
    Class B kits have a larger variety of items and extra supply for workplace settings that are considered higher-risk or industry specific.

    If you are not sure if you should have this Class A or a more robust Class B ANSI First Aid Kit, Read our helpful information about ANSI Z308.1-2015.

    Urgent First Aid™ also offers, ANSI A & B Refill/upgrade packs, and ANSI first aid kits meeting class A & B requirements for 10,  25, and 50 people in metal or plastic - and ANSI First Aid Cabinets, too.

    Urgent First Aid™ Bulk First Aid Kit, Metal, 198 Pieces, ANSI B, Types I II, 50 Person Urgent First Aid™ Bulk First Aid Kit, Metal, 198 Pieces, ANSI B, TYes I II, 50 Person

    Frequently asked questions on OSHA and ANSI, and what you need to know about compliance... What are the OSHA regulations for workplace first aid kits? What about ANSI requirements and ISEA guidelines?

    OSHA (U.S Department of Labor Occupational Safety & Health Administration) is the main federal agency charged with the enforcement of safety and health legislation. OSHA regulations regarding ?rst aid kits are contained in the Code of Federal Regulations under section 29 CFR 1910.151 and in Appendix A. OSHA does not provide speci?cations for ?rst aid kit contents per se but de?nes mandatory requirements for availability of kits on worksites. In Appendix A of the OSHA guidelines, ANSI is referenced as the originator of ?rst aid kit speci?cations and minimum contents requirements.

    NEW! Read about the just-released 2015 ISEA / ANSI Guidelines!

  • Beyond ANSI First Aid

    We've spent the last few weeks "Doing the ANSI Scramble" as our clients have been gearing up and either upgrading their first aid kits, or purchasing new ANSI 2015 first aid kits in order to comply with the new ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard— Minimum Requirements for Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies, which changes first aid kit requirements for every organization in the USA.

    But is that the end of it? It depends.

    First, there are special needs for certain types of businesses, especially ConstructionRestaurants and Foodservice, and companies with Commercial Fleet Vehicles or Trucking. Moreover, some States have additional requirements (California being a good example) and OSHA and various States have special first aid kit and supply requirements for Logging operations and other specialty fields of work.

    And then... there's the new ANSI Standard itself. While it specifies the exact minimum content for business first aid kits, it leaves it up to the employer to decide whthere the should get a Class A or Class B first aid kit and further which type of first aid kit case.

    ANSI says:

    In deciding which class of kit is more appropriate for a given workplace, employers should consider the risks and task load of the work environment and the potential severity and likelihood of occurrence of an injury. Employers should also consider whether multiple first aid kits are needed, based on the number of employees, physical layout of the work environment and the remoteness of the worksite to emergency services.

    Further, they note that an employer may wish to add yet more content to augment the minimum fill for specific situational needs: "These same considerations can be taken into account when determining if a first aid kit should be augmented with additional supplies, as noted in the appendix of this standard."

    The additional first aid supplies they list (and thereby implicitly recommend) are:

    Supplemental First Aid Supplies for Consideration – Applicable Environments

    It is recognized that each work environment is unique and it is expected that a first aid kit containing the minimum required first aid supplies will be augmented with additional items or additional quantities of required supplies based upon the specific hazards existing in a workplace environment. The selection of such items should be based on the recommendation and consultation of a person competent in first aid and cognizant of the hazards and on the number of people found in the workplace. Federal, state and local requirements should be consulted, where appropriate. Augment kits with the following first aid supplies, as applicable:

    FIRST AID SUPPLY PURPOSE
    Low dose aspirin Used to treat suspected heart attack
    Hemostatic agent For individuals with compromised clotting or uncontrollable bleeding
    Electrolyte replacement Heat-stress related injuries
    Glucose replacement Diabetic or hypoglycemic episodes
    Analgesics (oral and/or topical)/anti-inflammatory Pain management; swelling control
    Hydrocortisone Itchiness and skin-related reactions including rashes
    Antihistamine Allergic reactions
    Foil blanket Treat shock and/or cold-stress related injuries

     

    OSHAS

  • In case you missed the ANSI First Aid news on ABC, CBS and Fox...

    In case you missed it on The Street, Bloomberg, NBC, ABC, CBS, Fox and 100 other publications and Safety / Medical news channels:

    New ANSI First Aid Guidelines Knock Thousands of Companies out of Compliance

    Thousands of companies have purchased ANSI compliant first aid kits and cabinets since the American National Standards Institute last changed their Minimum URG-3683_2Requirements for Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies in 2009. ANSI just made sweeping changes to these standards causing these previously “ANSI compliant” first aid kits to now fail compliance. The new 2015 ANSI Standard Z308.1-2015, which becomes effective this Friday, June 17th, adds significant new content changes for the minimum business first aid supplies.

    Since OSHA regulations for workplace first aid kits (29 CFR 1910.151, Appendix A) reference ANSI as the originator of first aid kit minimum contents requirements, OSHA compliant first aid kits will no longer be “OSHA compliant”, either. Further, of the 28 US States with their own State Plans, these plans have either adopt ANSI Standard as their outright guideline, or refer to it as the basis for the “minimum fill” requirements for compliance.

    What has changed?

    There are 12 new types of first aid items and significantly higher counts of previously ANSI standard first aid supplies required in these new ANSI workplace first aid kits that were never before required. This adds up to 22 additional pieces in the basic ANSI Class A workplace first aid kit, and a whopping 145 extra pieces in the ANSI Class B Kits and Cabinets.

    First-Aid-Product.com, the leading online seller of OSHA and ANSI First Aid Kits since 1993 has added over 100 new ANSI Standard first aid kits and cabinets, including refill and upgrade packs to help businesses comply with the new requirements economically. “Our customers purchase our kits specifically to assure their regulatory compliance,” explains First-Aid-Product.com’s Chad Balash, “knowing so many would want to replace their kits or upgrade, our Team scrambled to design easy ANSI upgrade packs and whole kit replacement content packs.” While many organizations will purchase new kits altogether, this group felt it was important to offer a more affordable solution.  “We offer every conceivable configuration of new ANSI first aid kit and cabinet with options from 10-200+ people served, Plastic or metal, Class A or B, Types I-IV, even Bilingual kits, Construction, Restaurant, and Vehicle in several colors, wall mountable, weatherproof and even soft bag ANSI Kits,” notes Balash, “but the average small business may not want to pay for a whole new kit, and businesses with wall mounted cabinets may not want to remove their existing cabinet – so we made easy packs available that our clientele can just insert in existing first aid boxes”

    According to OSHA First Aid Expert, Matthew Henry, “The ANSI Standard is the bare minimum any business should have in their workplace first aid kit.” Mr. Henry, author of the Occupational Health & Safety’s oft-cited The Do's & Don'ts of First Aid Compliance, explains “While specific industries such as welding, construction and logging have their own regulatory requirements, all safety regulations, from Fed OSHA to each OSHA-approved State plan refer to the ANSI Z308.1 standard requirements for compliance. If it were my business or a client I was advising; I would certainly opt for a $19 upgrade pack over risking thousands of dollars in fines.”

    If in doubt about your First Aid compliance needs, err on the side of caution: upgrade to the new ANSI 2015 First Aid Kit requirements by Friday, so if an Inspector walks in, you can show them you have the newly required first aid supplies on order.

    About First-Aid-Product.com
    For a quarter century, First-Aid-Product.com has been saving lives and saving money with Wholesale Direct to the Public™ First Aid, CPR, Survival and Safety products online. As the Master Distributor for 100’s of top first aid brands, and manufacturer of their own product line, First-Aid-Product.com stocks over 300,000 products and enables businesses to exceed their compliance requirements below budget and with same day shipping of the highest quality safety supplies in the industry.

     

  • Workplace First Aid Kit Regulations require updated content by Friday...

    Get your new first aid ordered by Friday to avoid fines!

    The ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard— Minimum Requirements for Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies are effective this Friday. What does that mean? It means that your previously OSHA & ANSI compliant first aid kits and cabinets are no longer compliant! Whether you are in one of the 28 US States and Territories with their own State Plan, or if you are anywhere in the remaining US and fall directly under the Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Act doesn’t really matter. All these plans have either adopted ANSI Standards as their outright guideline, or refer to these standards as the basis for the “minimum fill” requirements for compliance. The new ANSI First Aid Standard requires more and different content than previously “compliant” kits have in them.
    See your compliance options below, or read more about OSHA & ANSI First Aid requirements.

    Our Recommended Solutions – any of these 3 easy options!

    Economy Solution: For typical work environments

    ANSI 2015 Class A Refill/Upgrade Pack:
    Just $19.99 (as low as $14.18 in quantity!)

    Add this to your first aid kit or cabinet (or replace entire content) for full ANSI Class A compliance! (Fits in most kit cases of 9” x 7” x 3” or larger)


    Heavy Duty Economy Solution:
    For workplace settings that are considered higher-risk or industry specific

    ANSI 2015 Class B Refill/Upgrade Pack:
    Just $49.60 (as low as $34.72 in quantity!)

    Add this to your first aid kit or cabinet (or replace entire content) for full ANSI Class B compliance! (Fits in most kit cases of 9” x 13” x 3” or larger)


    Complete Economy  Solution:
    For typical work environments

    ANSI 2015 Class A, Type I & II in metal or plastic kit case!

    Plastic: Just $19.99 (as low as $14.18 in quantity!)
    Metal: Just $29.99 (as low as $22.62 in quantity!)


    Complete
    Heavy Duty Economy Solution
    For workplace settings that are considered higher-risk or industry specific

    ANSI 2015 Class B, Type I & II in metal or plastic kit case!

    Plastic: Just $65.50 (as low as $45.85 in quantity!)
    Metal: Just $77.90 (as low as $54.53 in quantity!)


    Choose from over 100 different ANSI 2015 Compliant First Aid Kits, Cabinets, Refills Packs & Upgrade sets! Option from 10-200+ people served, Plastic or metal, Class A or B, Types I-IV, even Bilingual kits, Construction, Restaurant, and Vehicle in several colors, wall mountable, weatherproof and even soft bag ANSI Kits! Click here and use the easy-filtering navigation on the left to find exactly the kit you want or need! Starting at $11.97.



    Get your ANSI 2015 Upgrade pack designed specifically for these kits!


    Now – since you read all the way to the bottom… we’ll offer you an extra 10% off our already super-low wholesale direct to the public pricing when you place your order on or before the compliance deadline of 6/17/16! Enter code “Comply” in your shopping cart (not at checkout) or when you call toll free to place an order!

    The (Not So) Fine Print

    Offer expires at Midnight 6/17/16 – Available Online or Toll Free - Offer cannot be combined with any other offers or incentives. Offer cannot be applied to completed orders. While supplies last, offer subject to substitution or change without notice, call with questions or for further details.

    Valid ONLY on ANSI 2015 compliant first aid kits, cabinets, and refill/upgrade packs.

  • Get on the Bus, Gus... ANSI First Aid Standard Change effective June 17th!

    ANSI 2015 Compliant First Aid Kits

    OSHA & ANSI A+ Compliant 2 Shelf First Aid Cabinet for up to 75 people!

    NEW ANSI 2015 FIRST AID KIT REQUIREMENTS ARE EFFECTIVE June 17th! Read about ANSI Z308.1-2015

    It is time to get your plan together to upgrade or replace your business first aid supplies to assure OSHA & ANSI compliance.

    The most significant change from previous editions of the ANSI Minimum Requirements for Workplace Kits and Supplies is the introduction of two classes of first aid kits, based on the assortment and quantity of first aid supplies.

    Class A kits are designed to deal with most common workplace injuries, such as minor cuts, abrasions and sprains. Whereas Class B First aid kits include a broader range and quantity of supplies to deal with injuries in more complex or high-risk environments.

    First aid kits are also designated by Type (I, II, III or IV) depending on the work environment in which they are to be used. For example, Type 1 identifies kits used indoors and permanently mounted to a wall or other structure; Type IV kits are suitable for outdoor use and must pass tests for corrosion, moisture and impact resistance.

    As first aid experts in the field for 25 years now we often are asked "what should I do" and/or "what's the best way to go" when there is a major regulation or standard change in CPR or first aid. We've written many articles to help business owners and safety managers decipher this morass of info, but the bottom line is: err on the side of caution. Go with the new ANSI standards for a first aid kit or cabinet - it will almost always meet or exceed your OSHA requirements, and while refill or upgrade packs are available, they really aren't much less than a new kit, so unless you've got a wall-mounted cabinet that would be a bear to remove... just get a new kit and know you've got full content and fresh expiration dates as well as meeting all new guidelines.

    See ANSI 2015 Compliant First Aid Kits

  • About OSHA and ANSI

    Frequently asked questions on OSHA and ANSI, and what you need to know about compliance... What are the OSHA regulations for workplace first aid kits? What about ANSI Requirements and ISEA guidelines?

    NEW! Read about the just-released 2015 ISEA / ANSI Guidelines!

    OSHA First Aid Kits Definitions &
    ANSI First Aid Kit Requirements

    For OSHA and ANSI Compliant products, please click links below:OSHA First Aid Kits ANSI First Aid Kits OSHA Compliance Packages OSHA & ANSI SmartCompliance™

    Image of two ANSI compliant first aid kits with a superemposed title reading Join Our OSHA and ANSI Update ListClick to join our list: We’ll send you notices of OSHA & ANSI First Aid Regulations & Guideline updates including the release of NEW ANSI 2015 Kits + “upgrade packs” to keep you compliant!

    OSHA logo

      • Who is OSHA?OSHA (Occupational Safety & Health Administration) is a sub-agency of the US Department of Labor. It issues standards to segments of the work force and polices these regulations with a staff of inspectors who make periodic work site checks. The purpose of these standards is to insure workplace safety. Fines are imposed if repeated infractions are noted.
      • What are OSHA's requirements for a first aid kit?Based on Federal OSHA Regulation Standard 1910.151.b: "Adequate first aid supplies shall be readily available." This rule applies to treatment of minor injuries that occur in the workplace.
      • What do I need to do to ensure OSHA compliance?You should be concerned with OSHA compliance on both a federal and state level. Currently, 30 states follow the Federal OSHA regulations as stated above, while 22 states follow a regulation that combines the Federal standard and imposes an individualized state by state requirement. The state standard can be reviewed on the Internet or by contacting your local OSHA office.

    Image of 227-CP-2 compliant package.Both Federal and State OSHA regulations do include the 'non-mandatory' requirements that coincide with ANSI's first aid kit regulations. As a company, we feel that eventually, these agencies will adopt ANSI as part of their regulation.

    • Can this website  help me be in compliance? All our industrial first aid kits meet or exceed Federal OSHA standards. Additionally, our line includes metal and plastic unitized kits that meet or exceed Federal OSHA standards and exceed the new ANSI requirements. For more information on the new ANSI standards see the section below.

    ANSI Logo

    • What is ANSI?The American National Standards Institute publishes minimum standards of quality for many items related to safety. Now joined with ISEA, common First Aid Guidelines follow ANSI / ISEA recommendations.
    • Image of 240-AN ANSI certified package.Do they have a minimum content requirement for first aid?OSHA-ANSI Yes, to be ANSI compliant a first aid kit must have the required minimum fill according to standard ANSI Z308.1-2015. Now updated to ANSI (American National Standards Institute) / ISEA (International Safety Equipment Association) Revisions ANSI/ISEA Z308.1-2015, Minimum Requirements for Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies (revision and redesignation of ANSI Z308.1-2009 - now replaced by ANSI/ISEA Z308.1-2015)
    • Is ANSI mandatory?No, BUT there are now more than 20 states that have adopted ANSI standards as their state recommended requirements.
    • Why ANSI?OSHA requires adequate first aid supplies to be available in the workplace but they don't require any specific contents. By recommending a specific fill, one will be guaranteed to find necessary items in an ANSI kit.
    • Does ANSI affect unitized refill box colors?Yes, one of the most important parts of ANSI / ISEA Z308.1-2009 & ANSI / ISEA Z308.1-2015 is the standardization of colors on unitized refills. Bandages, Antiseptics, Burn Treatment, PPE and Miscellaneous items will each have their own color. This standardization will make it easy to recognize product quickly in an emergency.Read more about ANSI Color Code

    MORE ON ANSI / ISEA

    ISEA is the trade association for manufacturers of industrial first aid kits and supplies. Members of the group manufacture and market a full range of first aid kits and supplies, designed to meet user needs for a wide range of applications. See the Buyers Guide for a listing of first aid kits and components available from ISEA member companies.

    ISEA members have a seat at the table when standards are being written that affect their products; they get a first look at changes in standards, they influence the development of new standards, and they are kept informed of developments on standards around the world. ISEA is the secretariat for the American National Standard for first aid kits and supplies, ANSI/ISEA Z308.1, and managed the process by which a broad-based consensus group was brought together to prepare the expanded 2009 edition. This was briefly replaced by ANSI/ISEA Z308.1-2014, but due to analysis of the impracticality of a rolled wire splint, this was almost immediately supplanted with ANSI/ISEA Z308.1-2015 which describes a more useful 4" x 24" padded rolling splint - like a SAM splint.)

    ISEA gives members a full-time Washington office. They are kept up to date on important developments affecting their companies, and are identified with a respected and responsible organization that is an advocate for product standards and worker safety. ISEA has worked with OSHA to gain recognition of the ANIS/ISEA first aid kit standard as a guideline for the workplace. When authorities propose regulations that affect first aid kits or their contents, ISEA keeps members informed and ensures that their views are well represented in agency deliberations.

    ISEA members use the association to learn from each other, and work together to improve markets. Information services are tuned to member companies’ needs.

    Image of 16 Unit ANSI Compliance Unitized First Aid Kit - Metal case with GasketIn addition to bringing companies together in the First Aid Group, ISEA membership is a link to the larger world of safety equipment, both in the US and around the world. Companies receive regular bulletins and reports on standards, government policies and proposals, and market intelligence. They participate in the association’s Annual and Fall Meetings, where the industry comes together to share information and insight. Members’ products are listed in a Buyers Guide, published in print and in a searchable on-line database.

    For more than 75 years, ISEA has set the standard for personal safety equipment manufacturers, supporting and promoting the business interests of its member companies, united in the goal of protecting the health and safety of people worldwide. First Aid Standards American National Standard from ISEA.

    Image of ANSI Logo.ANSI / ISEA Z308.1-2009 & ANSI / ISEA Z308.1-2015 American National Standard - Minimum Requirements for Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies May 12, 2009 This standard, a revision to the 2003 edition, was prepared by the members of ISEA’s Industrial First Aid Group, in conjunction with leading industry stakeholders and was reviewed by a consensus panel of users, health and safety professionals and government agencies. Significant updates incorporated into this version include the designation of new kit types, expansion of the required supply list to include a first aid guide, and a redesign of the product label. Kits in compliance with this standard will provide a basic range of products to deal with most types of injuries encountered in the workplace. “During the revision process, much consideration was given to contemporary first aid protocols and the availability of products used to treat workplace injuries,” said Bob Rock, chairman of the ISEA Industrial First Aid Group and product manager of North by Honeywell. “The updated document reflects an assortment of supplies in sizes and quantities that are best-suited to treat worker injuries.” The kit label has been redesigned to draw specific attention to fact that each workplace is unique and, as such, may necessitate the availability of additional first aid supplies. “The standard developing committee recognized that as work sites vary, so does the likelihood for the need for specific first aid supplies beyond the minimum required items,” said Rock. “The new kit label is an added tool to remind employers that supplementary first aid contents may be needed.

    While infrequently cited, some requirements will ask for and "ANSI Type X" kit - these are the 2009 ANSI Types (See below for types 2015 I-IV):

    Type I

    Intended use: stationary, indoor settings in a controlled environment Potential for damage of kit contents: minimal Requirements: minimum fill requirements and the means for mounting in a fixed position. Typical applications: general indoor use, offices, manufacturing facilities

    Type II

    Intended use: portable, indoor settings, in a controlled environment Potential for damage of kit contents: minimal Requirements: minimum fill requirements; carrying handle; subjected to a drop test

    Type III

    Intended use: portable use outdoors and in mobile industries Potential for damage of kit contents: significant Requirements: moisture-resistant, corrosion-resistant, carrying handle; minimum fill requirements; means for mounting in fixed position; subjected to conditioning and drop tests Typical applications: general outdoor use, mobile industries.

    Image displaying OSHA logo and federal OSHA requirement approval tagline.

    Ready for an OSHA First Aid Kit? Now what about an OSHA Certified First Aid Kit? No? OK then... what about a First Aid Kit that is OSHA Approved? Nope. No such thing.

    OSHA sets forth OSHA First Aid Kit guidelines for General Industry, for Construction, and Industry Specific OSHA First Aid kit guidelines, but OSHA does not "Approve" any manufacturer's first aid kits... but it is up to each First Aid Kit manufacturer to assure that the kits fulfill the OSHA First Aid Kit Requirements. Responsible First Aid Kit Manufacturers may state that certain first aid kits are "OSHA Compliant" or that the kits "meets OSHA First Aid Kit Guidelines". The first aid kits on this site that are listed as "OSHA First Aid Kits" are "OSHA Compliant" in that they meet or exceed OSHA First Aid Guidelines for the purposes they are defined as suiting.

    If you are shopping around and see an "OSHA Approved First Aid Kit", or "OSHA Certified First Aid Kit" (and believe it, unscrupulous Manufacturers actually print such nonsense on their products) it is false. No two-ways about it - OSHA does not "endorse" and First Aid kit with certifications or approvals. If someone tells you they are selling you an "OSHA Approved First Aid Kit" beware...they are probably stretching the truth, ask them for the OSHA Compliance certification if they insist their First aid Kit is OSHA approved... otherwise, shop online here for OSHA Compliant First Aid Kits and OSHA Compliant First Aid Kit refills


    We've sorted our ANSI compliant First Aid refills for you by ANSI Color Codes - in addition to the standard colorized first aid refills for visual selection by first aid item type, we also offer convenient refill packs which include the basic ANSI requirements for ANSI Type I, II, III & IV classification first aid kits - Read more about ANSI / ISEA Z308.1-2009 and new ISEA / ANSI Z308.1-2015, American National Standard—Minimum Requirements for Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies. Don't forget your ANSI First Aid Guide!

    ANSI First Aid Kit Refills - Color coded ANSI / ISEA First Aid Kit Refill Items - Unitized ANSI Color Code Refills

    ANSI Refill Packs Antiseptic & Ointments Bandages Burn Treatment Personal Protective
    Equipment
    Miscellaneous
    ANSI Refill Bricks Alcohol Prep Pads Absorbent Compress Burn Relief CPR Adhesive Tape
    These ANSI First Aid Kit Refill Packs are designed to
    replenish the key items for 10, 16, 24 & 36 unit unitized ANSI Compliant first aid kits.
    Antiseptic Cleansing Wipes Adhesive Bandages Exam / Medical Grade Gloves Eye Care Products
    Povidone Wipes Compress Bandages Rescue Blankets
    Antibiotic Ointment Conforming Gauze Roll Bandages Insect Sting Relief Pads
    Gauze Dressing Pads Cold Compresses
    Triangular Bandages Ammonia Inhalants
    Trauma / Pressure Bandages Aspirin

    Why Color Codes for ANSI Unitized First Aid Refills? Why ANSI Unitized First Aid?

    ANSI / ISEA Type 1, Type II, Type III and Type IV first aid kits requirements must contain the first aid supplies listed below. The quantity, dimensions, or volume listed for each supply is the minimum for compliance with ANSI / ISEA Z308.1-2009 & ANSI / ISEA Z308.1-2015, American National Standard—Minimum Requirements for Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies. You may exceed these size requirements and still be in compliance with the ANSI / ISEA Standards, as long as the first aid items and supplies meet or exceed the performance requirements noted in the ANSI Standard.(See ANSI compliant first aid refills..)

    Color Coding of ANSI first aid refills is so rescuers can quickly visually identify the first aid items they need to perform first aid techniques safely and effectively on injuries.

    Unit packages follow this ANSI color coding:

    Image reading: This cabinet meets federal OSHA and ANSI requirements. Meets federal OSHA requirement and ANSI standard ANSI. State requirements may vary. See information product for details.BLUE - Antiseptics

    YELLOW - Bandages

    RED - Burn Treatment

    ORANGE - Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) - including CPR

    GREEN – Miscellaneous

    The size and style of color coding is discretionary and varies by Manufacturer but is in all cases designed to be easily identifiable.

    ANSI / ISEA Z308.1-2009 and new ISEA / ANSI Z308.1-2015 Type I, II, III or IV required minimum fill for First Aid:

    Required Minimum Fill: 1 First Aid Guide
    1 Absorbent Compress 4 x 8 in. min.
    16 Adhesive Bandages 1 x 3 in.
    1 Adhesive Tape 2.5 yd.
    10 Antiseptic Treatment Applications 0.5 gm. each
    6 Burn Treatment Applications 0.9 gm. each
    4 Sterile Pads 3 x 3 in. min.
    2 Pair Medical Exam Gloves
    1 Triangular Bandage 40 x 40 x 56 in. min.
    6 Antibiotic Treatment Applications 0.5 gm. each

    Additional ANSI Recommended First Aid Supplies:

    Analgesic (Oral)
    Bandage Compress 2 x 36 in. min.
    Breathing Barrier, single use
    Burn Dressing 12 sq. in. min.
    Cold Pack 4 x 5 in. min.
    Eye Covering 1/4 in. thick min.
    Eye/Face Wash, sterile 4 fl. oz. min
    Roller Bandage 2 in. x 4 yd. min.
    Hand Sanitizer, 0.9 gm. min

    Why Unitized? A first aid kit need not be "Unitized" in order to be ANSI compliant. We offer ANSI First Aid Kits that are "Bulk" as well (meaning loose supplies organized within the ANSI First Aid Kit).

    Unit First Aid: A system of packaging first aid materials in uniform sized packages containing one or more applications of first aid products. As an example - 1 "10 unit" ANSI First Aid Kit could hold the 10 ANSI required first aid items in 1 unit boxes. Similarly, a "36 unit" could hold the same 10 ANSI required first aid items in 1 unit boxes and still have room for 26 more "units" of first aid - this could be 26 additional 1 unit boxes, 13 additional 2 unit boxes, or a combinations such as 10 first aid items in 2 units refill boxes and 6 first aid items in 1 unit refill boxes, so the total fills the 36 "units" of empty space.

    But wait - there's More! Read more about ANSI First Aid Requirements and Standards.


    NEW!

    We would like to let you know about the new American National Standard- Minimum Requirements for Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies, ANSI/ISEA Z308.1-2015, which revises 2014 and 2009 publications.

    The assortment and quantity of supplies included in a first aid kit were chosen based upon a review of increased workplace incidents requiring first aid treatment, similar international standards, and current practices in treating injuries. This revision introduces two classes of first aid kits: Class A kits with contents designed to deal with most common types of workplace injuries, and Class B kits with a broader range and quantity of supplies to deal with injuries in more complex or high-risk environments. By expanding the items in a basic first aid kit, employees will have greater access to items needed to treat common workplace injuries. Many of the first aid supplies previously identified as being recommendations in the 2009 standard are now required for both newly-designated kit types.

    Understanding OSHA
    A guide to OSHA Regulations for First Aid Kits

    OSHA (U.S. Department of Labor Occupational Safety & Health Administration) is the main federal agency charged with the enforcement of safety and health legislation. OSHA regulations regarding first aid kits are contained in the Code of Federal Regulations under section 29 CFR 1910.151 and in Appendix A. OSHA does not provide specifications for first aid kit contents per se but defines mandatory requirements for availability of kits on worksites. In Appendix A of the OSHA guidelines, ANSI is referenced as the originator of first aid kit specifications and minimum contents requirements (see ANSI requirements in more detail below).

    The 2015 ANSI revision introduces two classes of first aid kits Class A kits with contents designed to deal with most common types of workplace injuries.
    Class B kits with a broader range and quantity of supplies to deal with injuries more complex or high-risk environments.

    ANSI Z308.1-2015 Required Contents
    In order to be ANSI compliant, First Aid Kits must contain the following components

    Please Note: The information contained in this publication is intended for general information purposes only. This publication is not a substitute for review of the applicable government regulations and standards, and should not be construed as legal advice or opinion. Readers with specific questions should refer to the cited regulation(s) or consult with a qualified consultant or an attorney.

    Comparing ANSI 2015 to ANSI 2009

    Classes of First Aid Kits and Required Supplies

    Characteristics of Types of First Aid Kits

    Type I

    • Intended use: stationary, indoor settings
    • Potential for damage: minimal
    • Requirements: minimum fill requirements and the means for mounting in a fixed position
    • Typical applications: general indoor use, offices, manufacturing facilities

    Type II

    • Intended use: portable, indoor settings
    • Potential for damage: minimal
    • Requirements: minimum fill requirements and the means to be portable
    • Typical applications: general indoor use, offices, manufacturing facilities

    Type III

    • Intended use: portable use in mobile, indoor/outdoor settings
    • Potential for damage: not probable
    • Requirements: minimum fill requirements; means for mounting in fixed position; water resistant seal
    • Typical applications: general indoor use, sheltered outdoor use

    Type IV

    • Intended use: portable use in mobile industries and/or outdoors settings
    • Potential for damage: significant
    • Requirements: minimum fill requirements; means for mounting in fixed position; corrosion and moisture resistance; impact resistance; (meets Section 5.2.5 requirements)
    • Typical applications: transportation, utility, and construction industry; armed forces

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