ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard Minimum Requirements  Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies - Buy new ANSI Kits
ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard Minimum Requirements Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies - Buy new ANSI Kits

CPR

  • Prestan Professional AED Trainer Remote

    Prestan Professional AED Trainer Optional Remote.

    • Optional Device
    • Allows for different training styles
    • Contains Set-up buttons and unit control buttons
    • Simulate loose pad
    • Initiate “Press Deeper” during CPR
    • Pause/Play, or Ending
    • Setup Controls are duplicated on Remote

    View all of our Prestan Professional Supplies or see our AED Trainer Optional Remotes below.

  • This year it is all about YOU, our Customer.

    This year it is all about YOU, our Customer.

    2019. This year, we want to get personal with our customers. How can we help you meet your safety needs and cut your spending?
    We've been doing this for over 25 years now, and really do know how to help you make a difference if you will let us.
    Just "reply" to this email with what you want or need, or call us Toll Free, and we will assign the best person or people from our Team to help you.

    Some ideas/requests we have had from other customers that may inspire you:

    • Can you review our first aid, CPR, and emergency item purchases from all suppliers last year and help us find more cost-effective options?
    • Can you let us know when X will be on sale? We buy a lot of it and would like to stock up when it is at the lowest price this year.
    • We are stocked up on First Aid Items, but don't have disaster supplies - what do you recommend?
    • Can you check to see if our supplies meet OSHA requirements for our business?
    • Can you help us restock our expired and depleted kits?
    • We have our first aid supplies, but need training, who do you recommend?
    • Can we get better pricing on X?
    • We would like to send out a custom kit to our clients and employees this year to show we care - can you help?

    What can we do? Ask anything!
    OK - we are standing by have at us! We value your continued business and are here to do anything and everything we can.
    Happy New Year!

  • First Aid, Safety, CPR, and Preparedness Gifts For Everyone on Your List!

  • Simple, Affordable, Integrated CPR Performance Feedback

    With the recent requirement of CPR feedback devices announced by both the American Heart Association and the American Red Cross, you may be asking how to most effectively meet these requirements. Both organizations state the products should have audio feedback and/or visual feedback on compression depth and rate the Preston professional mannequins with CPR feedback meet all the requirements.

    Stated by both organizations Preston CPR feedback ensures high quality CPR by giving instructors and students real-time feedback. An audible click is heard when the proper compression depth is reached. Two green lights illuminate when the compression rate is in the range of 100 to 120 compressions per minute. If the student goes too fast over 120 a yellow light flashes warning them to slow down.

    Preston CPR feedback mannequins are easy to understand eliminating any confusion for the student and giving them more confidence in their CPR skills. Instructors love that the CPR feedback is integrated into the mannequin eliminating the need for extra add-on equipment or cords.

    The Preston professional adult child and infant mannequins all provide CPR feedback needed to meet the new requirements.

  • Prestan Training Manikins - Integrated Feedback Device Guidelines Facts

    Directive Feedback Required! Be sure your equipment complies!

    The American Heart Association has announced that they ..."will now require the use of an instrumented directive feedback device in all courses that teach adult CPR skills, effective January 31, 2019."

    "To comply with the new course requirement, feedback devices must, at a minimum, measure and provide real-time audio feedback and/or visual feedback (or both) on compression rate and depth."

    Prestan Professional Manikins with CPR Feedback FULLY MEET THESE REQUIREMENTS! Click Here to shop now!

    Correct Depth / Correct Rate

    Prestan Professional CPR Manikins with CPR Feedback!

    An audible click for correct DEPTH / Visual lights for correct RATE

    Simple, Affordable, Integrated Feedback. 2019 Guidelines Compliant.

    CPR Feedback Rate Monitors may be purchased and easily installed into Prestan Manikins previously purchased without the monitor.

    Build Confidence!

    Build the confidence you need to save lives!

    Building confidence is necessary while preparing yourself to be READY to engage in CPR. Ask yourself today how you build confidence in a CPR class. Does it include audio and visual feedback while training with your manikin?

    Meet your confidence goals with the SIMPLE, AFFORDABLE, INTEGRATED FEEDBACK of the Prestan Professional Manikins.

    Meet 2019 CPR Feedback Directive from AHA and ARC

    Prestan Professional Manikins Comply with the 2019 Integrated Feedback Device Guidelines

    • No wires to connect
    • No device hookup
    • No extra equipment

    Feedback is contained within the manikin!

  • Black Friday & Cyber Monday Deals

    The (Not So) Fine Print

    Offer expires midnight 11/30/17 – Available Online at First-Aid-Product.com or Toll Free (800) 933-8495 - While supplies last, offer subject to substitution or change without notice, call with questions or for further details.

  • Steps for using an AED for children ages 1 to 8 years old

    If a child is found unconscious, administer 2 minutes or 5 cycles of Child CPR before placement and use of the AED.

    If an AED is used for a child casualty, check to see if Child AED pads are available with the AED. If the Child pads are available, follow the directions. If only Adult pads are available, place one pad on the child’s back and one pad on the front of the chest in the middle.

    1. Power on the AED.
    2. Attach the electrode pads on casualty according to the instructions included.  These directions are generally to place first pad on upper right side of chest, just below the collarbone and the second pad on the lower left side of the chest, just below and to the left of the nipple.
    3. Allow the AED to analyze the casualty’s heart rhythm. Stop CPR and do not touch or move the casualty during this phase. No one should touch or have contact with the casualty for the next few steps.
    4. If defibrillation is required, the AED will prompt the responder to administer a shock or will automatically shock. Remember, do not touch the casualty while the AED is analyzing or shocking.
    5. Step back and announce, “Stand Clear!” to avoid inadvertently disturbing the analysis of the heart rhythm or risk shocking a responder or bystander. Scan the area to be sure everyone is clear of the casualty. Assistant responders should be trained to respond clearly and loudly that they are “Clear!
    6. If directed to do so, push the appropriate button to administer a shock to the casualty.
    7. Repeat shocks if prompted to do so. The AED is designed to administer shocks only when it is appropriate for the casualty’s condition.  A responder cannot accidentally administer an unneeded shock, even if the shock button is pressed repeatedly.
    8. Recheck for responsiveness. Resume CPR for 2 minutes. Allow the AED to analyze the heart rhythm every two minutes or until Emergency Medical Services arrive and take over care of the casualty.

    Image of child being rescued with AED

    Content excerpted from the Urgent First Aid Guide used by permission Copyright 2013 UrgentFirstAid.com All Rights Reserved. Get a full copy of the First Aid Guide for under $1!

    Automated External Defibrillation (AED) is something everyone should know, but is not something you can learn by reading a great article like this, nor with online training. Current research indicates that the chance of surviving Sudden Cardiac Arrest is improved by up to 70% if an AED is used within the first few minutes. Find out what to do with so little time, by signing up for AED Training at your location... check out American CPR Training™

  • Basic Steps for Using an AED

    If a casualty has signs of Sudden Cardiac Arrest such as being unresponsive or not breathing, begin CPR. Once the AED arrives, use the following steps:Graphic of male with AED electrode pads on his chest

    1. Power on the AED.
    2. Attach the electrode pads on casualty according to the instructions included.  These directions are generally to place first pad on upper right side of chest, just below the collarbone and the second pad on the lower left side of the chest, just below and to the left of the nipple.
    3. Allow the AED to analyze the casualty’s heart rhythm. Stop CPR and do not touch or move the casualty during this phase. No one should touch or have contact with the casualty for the next few steps.
    4. If defibrillation is required, the AED will prompt the responder to administer a shock or will automatically shock. Remember, do not touch the casualty while the AED is analyzing or shocking.
    5. Step back and announce, “Stand Clear!” to avoid inadvertently disturbing the analysis of the heart rhythm or risk shocking a responder or bystander. Scan the area to be sure everyone is clear of the casualty. Assistant responders should be trained to respond clearly and loudly that they are “Clear!
    6. If directed to do so, push the appropriate button to administer a shock to the casualty.
    7. Repeat shocks if prompted to do so. The AED is designed to administer shocks only when it is appropriate for the casualty’s condition.  A responder cannot accidentally administer an unneeded shock, even if the shock button is pressed repeatedly.
    8. Recheck for responsiveness. Resume CPR for 2 minutes. Allow the AED to analyze the heart rhythm every two minutes or until Emergency Medical Services arrive and take over care of the casualty.

    Content excerpted from the Urgent First Aid Guide used by permission Copyright 2013 UrgentFirstAid.com All Rights Reserved. Get a full copy of the First Aid Guide for under $1!

    Automated External Defibrillation (AED) is something everyone should know, but is not something you can learn by reading a great article like this, nor with online training. Current research indicates that the chance of surviving Sudden Cardiac Arrest is improved by up to 70% if an AED is used within the first few minutes. Find out what to do with so little time, by signing up for AED Training at your location... check out American CPR Training™

  • Basic C.A.R.E. CPR™ Tips

    Image of two students practicing C.A.R.E. CPR~ The first concern in any emergency situation: Check the area for Danger!

    If the area is not safe to approach, stay back and call 9-1-1. Look for chemical spills, downed power lines, or any other unsafe environment. If the area is safe, then proceed to Step 1.

    Step 1 ~ Check for Responsiveness (tap and shout ~ “Are you okay?!?”)
    No response means immediate action is required. No response would be no obvious signs of responsiveness such as; movement, talking, coughing, or breathing. Gasping or inadequate breathing is treated as unresponsiveness as well and still requires immediate attention. Recognition of Sudden Cardiac Arrest is a KEY element in the links of survival.
    *With children and infants, no crying is another sign of unresponsiveness.

    Step 2 ~ Call 9-1-1/ Activate EMS ~ Retrieve the nearest AED. Responders should always request assistance from others at the scene to make the 9-1-1 call and/or to retrieve the AED unit. If a responder is alone, and does not suspect a breathing emergency, the responder should immediately call 9-1-1 and retrieve the AED themselves and then begin CPR. Once the call is connected, the dispatcher should help guide the responder. If the responder is trained in CPR, the responder should let the dispatcher know they are trained.

    *The exception to this rule is in the case of children under the age of 8 years old, including infants. Most children and infants suffer respiratory related causes of arrest. Therefore, early CPR including rescue breaths provides the best chance of survival. If a responder is alone, it is recommended they first provide 2 minutes or 5 cycles of Child CPR before he/she calls 9-1-1 to activate EMS and/or retrieves an AED if one is nearby.

    Make sure the casualty is lying face up on a hard surface. A soft bed or couch will not allow the responder to adequately perform chest compressions.

    Step 3 ~ C: Compress Chest (for Adults and Children older than 8 years old)

    • Position the heels of both hands at the center of the chest.
      • For Children 1-8 years, position the heels of one or two hands (depending on the size of the child) at the center of the chest.
      • For Infants 1 year and younger, position two fingers of one hand in the center of the chest one finger width below the nipple line.
    • Deliver 30 compressions at a rate of at least 100 per minute.
    • Compress chest at a depth of at least 2” (or 5 cm) deep.
      • For Children 1-8 years, compress chest at a depth of 2” or 1/3 the depth of the chest
      • For Infants 1 year and younger, compress chest at a depth of 1½” or 1/3 the diameter of the chest.
    • Allow complete recoil after each compression to allow the heart to refill with blood.
    • Do not delay starting chest compressions or interrupt the compressions once they are initiated. Compressions have the most positive effect if there are minimal or no interruptions.
    • Begin high quality, fast & focused, chest compressions immediately.

    Step 4 ~ A: Airway

    • Open Airway
    • Tilt head
    • Lift chin

    Tilting the head back and lifting the chin will move the tongue away from the back of the throat and allow an open airway.
    *With an Infant 1 year old or younger, tilt head back slightly – do not overextend as this can close the airway on an infant or injure the infant.

    Step 5 ~ R: Rescue Breathing (for Adults and Children older than 8 years old)

    • Pinch nose
    • Seal mouth
      • For Infants 1 year and younger, seal infant’s mouth and nose with the responder’s mouth or rescue mask.
    • Deliver two breaths about one second per rescue breath.
      • For Infants 1 year and younger, deliver two puffs about one second per rescue breath. *Be careful not to use too much force, as an infant’s lungs are much smaller than an adult or child casualty’s lungs and can cause serious damage.
    • Watch chest rise and fall to ensure breaths are going in.
    • If the air does not go in, re-tilt the airway and try again.

    While giving rescue breaths, ensure that the mouth is completely sealed and the nose pinched closed so the air goes into the casualty’s airway, without escaping through the nose and/or mouth.

    Avoid giving excessive or rapid ventilations, as this may cause the casualty to vomit and aspirate the fluid into their lungs and/or may make the responder dizzy and light-headed.

    Step 6 ~ E: External Defibrillation

    • When the AED arrives on the scene or is available, a Rescuer should try to place the electrodes / pads on the casualty and turn on the AED without interruptions to CPR. Once the AED prompts are followed and the AED has been used to deliver a shock if need be, continue CPR until the AED indicates if any (further) shocks are needed. If no shock was advised in the beginning, keep the pads on the casualty while performing CPR so that CPR is not later interrupted to take pads off and/or put them back on for the AED to re-analyze the heart. Repeat until help arrives.
      *Advancements in technology have made AEDs more user-friendly and simple to operate. Easy to follow audio and visual cues tell responders what to do when using an AED and most will instruct the responder through CPR as well. A shock is delivered only if the casualty needs it. There is no need to be concerned about shocking a person who does not need it.

    Continue CPR until the responder is too exhausted to continue, it becomes too dangerous for the responder to continue, EMS arrives, or the casualty starts breathing. If an AED arrives on the scene after CPR has begun, the Responder should try to place the pads on the casualty and turn on the AED without interruptions to CPR as noted above. Use Child AED pads if the casualty is a child under 8 years of age or an infant. Once the prompts are followed and the AED has been used to either shock or not, continue CPR until the AED prompt indicates if any further shocks are advised. Repeat until help arrives.

    Content excerpted from the Urgent First Aid Guide used by permission Copyright 2013 UrgentFirstAid.com All Rights Reserved. Get a full copy of the First Aid Guide for under $1!

    CPR is something everyone should know, but is not something you can learn by reading a great article like this, nor with online training. Think about it... do you want someone trying to save your life that "learned CPR" by clicking a mouse? Find out about LIVE CPR Training at your location... check out American CPR Training™

  • Steps for Using an AED if an Unconscious Casualty is Found In Water

    Image of first responsder rescuing an unconscious casualty in the waterIf an unconscious casualty is found in water, remove the casualty from the water and away from any water deep enough to splash. Follow the steps below for AED use.

    1. Power on the AED.
    2. Attach the electrode pads on casualty according to the instructions included. These directions are generally to place first pad on upper right side of chest, just below the collarbone and the second pad on the lower left side of the chest, just below and to the left of the nipple.
    3. Allow the AED to analyze the casualty’s heart rhythm. Stop CPR and do not touch or move the casualty during this phase. No one should touch or have contact with the casualty for the next few steps.
    4. If defibrillation is required, the AED will prompt the responder to administer a shock or will automatically shock. Remember, do not touch the casualty while the AED is analyzing or shocking.
    5. Step back and announce, “Stand Clear!” to avoid inadvertently disturbing the analysis of the heart rhythm or risk shocking a responder or bystander. Scan the area to be sure everyone is clear of the casualty. Assistant responders should be trained to respond clearly and loudly that they are “Clear!”
    6. If directed to do so, push the appropriate button to administer a shock to the casualty.
    7. Repeat shocks if prompted to do so. The AED is designed to administer shocks only when it is appropriate for the casualty’s condition. A responder cannot accidentally administer an unneeded shock, even if the shock button is pressed repeatedly.
    8. Recheck for responsiveness. Resume
    CPR for 2 minutes. Allow the AED to analyze the heart rhythm every two minutes or until Emergency Medical Services arrive and take over care of the casualty.

    Content excerpted from the Urgent First Aid Guide used by permission Copyright 2013 UrgentFirstAid.com All Rights Reserved. Get a full copy of the First Aid Guide for under $1!

    Automated External Defibrillation (AED) use is something everyone should know, but is not something you can learn by reading a great article like this, nor with online training. Current research indicates that the chance of surviving Sudden Cardiac Arrest is improved by up to 70% if an AED is used within the first few minutes. Find out what to do with so little time, by signing up for AED Training at your location... check out American CPR Training™

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