ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard Minimum Requirements  Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies - Buy new ANSI Kits
ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard Minimum Requirements Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies - Buy new ANSI Kits

evacuation

  • Hurricane & Other Preparedness

    Are You Ready?!

    It is easy to say "I am going to prepare". We all plan to be prepared. Disasters have a way of happening before we are actually prepared. Here are some free and inexpensive ways to jump start your preparedness today.

    Fast & Easy Ways to Prepare.

    Get started now! Share these great infographics with everyone you know. If you are generous, stock up on some inexpensive ponchos and emergency blankets to share with everyone in your workplace, family, or group. From under a buck!

    See our recommended Survival & Emergency Gear Products below, or visit our Disaster Survival page.

    Learn More... FREE!

  • Hurricane Alley Emergency Alert

    The latest expert predictions have been updated...

    ...and now call for up to 9 Hurricanes to hit the USA this 2019 Hurricane season!

    According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Climate Prediction Center the likelihood of an above-normal Atlantic hurricane season has increased... and we are at the very beginning of this upcoming hurricane season. ARE YOU READY? You should have ample supplies at home and in your vehicles, at work, school, etc. Build your own kits or buy appropriate survival kits before the rush.

    August 8, 2019 NOAA forecasters monitoring oceanic and atmospheric patterns say conditions are now more favorable for above-normal hurricane activity since El Nino has now ended. Two named storms have formed so far this year and the peak months of the hurricane season, August through October, are now underway.

    Learn more with these helpful articles:

    Start now with these easy items to have on hand:

    Ready to go Kits & Supplies:

  • FEMA Prepares for Hurricanes and so are we!

    FEMA is working with state, local, tribal and territorial partners to prepare for the potential impacts from storms in the Atlantic, Caribbean, and Pacific.

    Successful response and recovery to disasters is a team effort. FEMA is not the only responder in the recovery of states and communities that have been devastated by disasters. We all need to be prepared. We need all levels of government to work together to transform our nation to have a true culture of preparedness.

    When it comes to disaster response, the entire community has a role to play. See FEMA's "Disaster Response is a Team Effort" below to see how this works.

    We Shipped 20,000 Hygiene Kits for FEMA Preparation

    As we did with the Puerto Rico hurricanes last year when we supplied tens of thousands of First Aid Kits for FEMA relief, this year we are already involved! Today we shipped 20 thousand hygiene kits for a FEMA contract order in preparation for Hurricane Florence relief. More to come. Stay Posted.

    Click Images Below to See FEMA Hygiene Kit Assembly

    Find an Emergency Evacuation Shelter Near You

    If you are in the path of Hurricane #Florence, listen to local officials for evacuation orders. If you need a safe place to go, text SHELTER and your zip code (i.e. SHELTER 12345) to 4FEMA (43362) to locate an open emergency shelter near you. You can also look up shelters on the FEMA App.

  • Drill

    Home Fire Evacuation Ladder Home Fire Evacuation Ladder

    We've discussed evacuation plans for businesses, and Family Emergency Readiness... Many of the same principles applied to workplace emergencies can be applied at home and in a neighborhood.  Considering this year's National Preparedness Month Theme (“Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today.”) you should not only plan and practice your emergency communication plans, but also evacuation... try expanding this to a neighborhood-wide event, too with a central gathering point and head count, just as a business would, but instead of checking off by department, count off by household... it's a great way to raise awareness and to build a "team spirit" in the neighborhood which can foster better results later in the event of a genuine calamity.

    We encourage you to participate in this Presidential national declaration to prepare individuals, families, and communities across the nation. During September, and especially on the September 30 National PrepareAthon! Day, cities and counties across the country are planning events to bring together schools, businesses, city governments, houses of worship, hospitals, individuals, and families to participate in drills and activities for hazards in their areas. We encourage you to register your participation on the America’s PrepareAthon! website.

    NPM-DrillConduct a drill to practice emergency response actions for local hazards.

    The “Take Action” section of ready.gov/prepare has How To Prepare guides, maps of historical activity for different hazards, and Prepare Your Organization Playbooks, which give guidance on how to hold drills for evacuating, practicing tornado safety, and staying in place.

    Learn about all ten different actions you can take with your family, organization, and local community to prepare for emergencies and participate and download the 10 Ways to Participate in America’s PrepareAthon! Guide

    Don't forget to do a neighbor check! Always check with each other in case of emergency. September is National Preparedness Month. Learn more at www.ready.gov/September. Image sized for Facebook.Don't forget to do a neighbor check! Always check with each other in case of emergency. September is National Preparedness Month. Learn more at www.ready.gov/September. Image sized for Facebook.

  • Hurricane Preparedness?

    You can't stop a tropical storm or hurricane, but you can take steps now to protect you,  your family, your business, and your community. Atlantic Hurricane Season is not over, and as we head into National Preparednes Month in September think about this year's theme “Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today.”and how it applies to you and your readines... Hurricanes are not just a coastal concern, they can, of course batter the coasts with winds, rain, and storm surges, but they can also strike interior states, and can cause severe inland flooding.

    If you live in coastal areas at risk, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) encourages you to begin preparing yourself for hurricane season. The Atlantic hurricane season is June 1 through November 30 each year.

    Hurricane & Tsunami: Hurricanes, Tropical Storms, Cyclones, Storm Surge and Tsunami… Whew! First let us point out that Hurricanes are not just a coastal concern. Hurricanes cause serious harm inland as well. Don’t think that you won’t be impacted by hurricanes just because you are many miles from the coastline. You are not necessarily immune to the ravages of Hurricanes and Tropical Storms. Tropical cyclones often produce widespread, torrential rains in excess of 6 inches, which may result in deadly and destructive floods. In fact, flooding is the major threat from tropical cyclones for people living inland. Flash flooding, defined as a rapid rise in water levels, can occur quickly due to intense rainfall. Longer term flooding on rivers and streams can persist for several days after the storm, and a Storm Surge (water from the ocean that is pushed toward the shore by the force of the winds swirling around the hurricane. This advancing surge combines with the normal tides and can increase the water level by 30 feet or more) can back up rivers and estuaries that normally flow freely to sea – creating overrun riverbanks upstream. Preparedness for these onslaughts includes raingear and ponchos, standard preparedness supplies and evacuation plans – plus all the flood considerations and extra attention to communication devices as landlines and mobile phones will almost certainly be out after major winds.

    Are you READY? Are you READY?

    Please follow these important hurricane preparedness tips from CDC:

    After you have read these tips, please review the other resources available on the CDC Hurricanes website.

  • Are you ready to Bug Out?

    "Bug Out" is a term used frequently by preppers, referring to when you need to get out of Dodge because the SHTF*, or in extremist points of view when TEOTWAWKI** occurs.

    Hurricane-EvacuationWell, on a more basic level, you should be prepared for evacuation, including having your Bug Out Bag ready to roll no matter what the calamity... during Hurricane Preparedness Week we focus on readying for hurricane evacuation (including storm surges)

    Survival Tips

    • Tip #1: Prepare your car before you prepare your home. Learn Why...
    • Tip #2: Eat food in your freezer after the food in your refrigerator. Learn Why...
    • Tip #3: Do not flush your toilets (Yet). Learn Why...
    • Tip #4: Change your flashlight and emergency radio batteries every time you adjust your clocks (daylight savings and standard time). Learn Why...
    Road Warrior - see all our Auto Emergency Survival Kits! Road Warrior - see all our Auto Emergency Survival Kits!

    The first thing you need to do is find out if you live in a storm surge hurricane evacuation zone or if you’re in a home that would be unsafe during a hurricane. If you are, figure out where you’d go and how you’d get there if told to evacuate. You do not need to travel hundreds of miles. Identify someone, perhaps a friend or relative who doesn’t live in a zone or unsafe home, and work it out with them to use their home as your evacuation destination. Be sure to account for your pets, as most local shelters do not permit them. Put the plan in writing for you and those you care about.

    *  SHTF: When the "Stuff" Hits the Fan
    ** TEOTWAWKI: The end of the World as we know it.

    shop-preparedness-wide

  • Family Emergency Readiness

    HOLD A DISASTER DRILL

    Family members should know:

    • How to shut off the main gas and water valves,
    • The safe spots and danger spots in the house,
    • How to ride out an earthquake or major storm,
    • When to exit the house and where to collect,
    • Where to meet if separated,
    • The telephone number of a trusted friend or family member,
    • The location of the survival equipment and first aid supplies and how to use them.

    homr-emergency-plan

  • Tsunami Season: #tsunami ?

    Tsunami-HazardIs there such a thing as Tsunami Season? No. A tsunami can strike anywhere along an ocean coast at any time and can be very dangerous to life and property. While it is important if you live, work or play on the coast, to prepare for a tsunami, it is also important to realize that the effects can reach far inland following waterways and low spots causing extensive inland flooding. Meteotsunamis occur inland as well, especially along the Great Lakes.

    What is a tsunami?

    A tsunami is not a "Tidal Wave" as movies so often dramatically portray Tsunamis are a series of waves (not just one) caused by a large and sudden disturbance of the sea. Most tsunamis are caused by undersea earthquakes, but not all earthquakes cause tsunamis, and smaller earthquakes at or near water may cause tsunami-like results in large bodies of water other than oceans.

    Not all tsunamis act the same. And, an individual tsunami may impact coasts differently. A small tsunami in one place may be very large a few miles away. The speed of a tsunami depends on the depth of the ocean. In the deep ocean, tsunami waves are barely noticeable but can move as fast as a jet plane, over 500 mph. As the waves enter shallow water near land, they slow to approximately 20 or 30 mph. That is still faster than a person can run. As the waves slow down, they can grow in height and currents intensify. Most tsunami waves are less than 10 feet high, but in extreme cases, can exceed 100 feet. When a tsunami comes ashore, it will not look like a normal wind wave. It may look like a fast-rising flood or a wall of water. Sometimes, before the water rushes on land, it will drain away suddenly, showing the ocean floor, reefs and fish like a very low tide. Tsunamis can travel up rivers and streams that lead to the ocean. A large tsunami can flood low-lying coastal areas more than a mile inland. The series of waves that flood, drain away and then reflood the land may last for hours. The time between waves ranges from five minutes to an hour. The first wave to reach the shore may not be the largest or the most damaging. It is not possible to predict how long a tsunami will last, how many waves there will be, or how much time there will be between waves. Not all tsunamis act the same. And, an individual tsunami may impact coasts differently. A small tsunami in one place may be very large a few miles away.
    The speed of a tsunami depends on the depth of the ocean. In the deep ocean, tsunami waves are barely noticeable but can move as fast as a jet plane, over 500 mph. As the waves enter shallow water near land, they slow to approximately 20 or 30 mph. That is still faster than a person can run.
    As the waves slow down, they can grow in height and currents intensify. Most tsunami waves are less than 10 feet high, but in extreme cases, can exceed 100 feet. When a tsunami comes ashore, it will not look like a normal wind wave. It may look like a fast-rising flood or a wall of water. Sometimes, before the water rushes on land, it will drain away suddenly, showing the ocean floor, reefs and fish like a very low tide. Tsunamis can travel up rivers and streams that lead to the ocean. A large tsunami can flood low-lying coastal areas more than a mile inland.
    The series of waves that flood, drain away and then reflood the land may last for hours. The time between waves ranges from five minutes to an hour. The first wave to reach the shore may not be the largest or the most damaging. It is not possible to predict how long a tsunami will last, how many waves there will be, or how much time there will be between waves.

    Tsunamis are among the most powerful and destructive natural forces. Tsunami waves radiate outward in all directions from the causal disturbance and can move across entire ocean basins. Most tsunamis are caused by undersea earthquakes, but can also be caused by landslides, volcanic activity, certain types of weather and meteorites.  Weather occurrences, too can cause meteotsunamis, especially along the Gulf of Mexico and large water bodies such as the Great Lakes.

    What is a Meteotsunami?

    Meteotsunamis have characteristics similar to earthquake-generated tsunamis, but are caused by air pressure disturbances often associated with fast moving weather systems, such as squall lines.

    These disturbances can generate waves in the ocean that travel at the same speed as the overhead weather system. Development of a meteotsunami depends on several factors such as the intensity, direction, and speed of the disturbance as it travels over a water body with a depth that enhances wave magnification.

    Like an earthquake-generated tsunami, a meteotsunami affects the entire water column and can become dangerous when it hits shallow water, which causes it to slow down and increase in height and intensity. Even greater magnification can occur in semi-enclosed water bodies like harbors, inlets, and bays.

    Meteotsunamis are regional in nature. In the United States, conditions for destructive meteotsunamis are most favorable along the East Coast, Gulf of Mexico, and in the Great Lakes, where they may pose a greater threat than earthquake-generated tsunamis.

    As Weather Ready Nation Ambassadors, we strongly urge you to learn what to do before, during and after a tsunami that could save your life and the lives of your family and friends.

    Most of the things you need to do to prepare for a tsunami are basic disaster survival steps you should follow to prepare for the other hazards that may impact your community. Some actions, however, are unique to tsunamis since response time may be limited.

    Tsunami-Zone

    • Find out if your home, school, workplace or other frequently visited places are in tsunami hazard or evacuation zones and if your community has had tsunamis in the past. Your local emergency management office, your state's geologic or tsunami hazard website and your local National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office are good resources for information about your risk.
    • Find out if your community is TsunamiReady. Communities recognized by the National Weather Service as TsunamiReady are better prepared for tsunamis.

    There are two ways that you may be warned that a tsunami is coming: an official tsunami warning and a natural tsunami warning. Both are equally important. You may not get both. Be prepared to respond immediately to whatever you hear or see first.

    • An official tsunami warning will be broadcast through local radio and television, wireless emergency alerts, NOAA Weather Radio and NOAA websites (like Tsunami.gov). It may also come through outdoor sirens, local officials, text message alerts and telephone notifications.
    • There may not always be time to wait for an official tsunami warning. A natural tsunami warning may your first, best or only warning that a tsunami is on its way. Natural tsunami warnings include strong or long earthquakes, a loud roar (like a train or an airplane) from the ocean, and unusual ocean behavior. The ocean could look like a fast-rising flood or a wall of water. Or, it could drain away suddenly, showing the ocean floor, reefs and fish like a very low tide. If you experience any of these warnings, even just one, a tsunami could be coming.
    • Get a battery-operated NOAA Weather Radio to receive official alerts and other hazard information 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
    • Sign up for email and text message alerts from your local emergency management office and make sure your mobile devices are set to receive wireless emergency alerts.
    • Make an emergency plan and a family communication plan and put together a portable disaster supplies kit that is easily accessible and contains basic items you and your family may need in any emergency. Include your pets in all your preparedness efforts. Since you do not know where you will be when disaster strikes, prepare kits for work and your car, too.
    • Meet with your family to discuss the plan and why you need to prepare for a disaster.
    • Practice your plan and keep it up to date.
    • Be a role model. Share your knowledge and plans with friends and neighbors so they can prepare themselves and their loved ones.

    If your home, school, workplace or other frequently visited places are in tsunami hazard or evacuation zones, your emergency plan should include evacuation plans.

    • Find out from your local emergency management office if there are evacuation routes and assembly areas identified for your community and if a map is available.
    • If assembly areas are not identified, plan to evacuate to a safe place that is on high ground or inland (away from the coast) and outside the tsunami hazard or evacuation zone. You may need to identify more than one safe place, depending on where you may be when you get a tsunami warning (e.g., home, work, etc.). You should plan to be able to reach your safe place on foot if you can because of possible road damage, closed roads and traffic jams. If you are concerned that you will not be able to reach a safe place in time, ask your local emergency management office about vertical evacuation. Some strong (e.g., reinforced concrete) and tall buildings may be able to provide protection if no other options are available.
    • Map out evacuation routes to your safe place(s) from your home, workplace or any other place you visit often that is in a tsunami hazard or evacuation zone.
    • Practice walking your evacuation routes, including at night and in bad weather. Familiarity with the routes will make evacuation quicker and easier if you ever need to evacuate for real.
    • If you have children that go to school in a tsunami hazard or evacuation zone, find out about the school's plans for evacuating and keeping the children safe. Find out where the assembly area is and where you should pick up your children after the danger has passed.
    • If you are visiting an area at risk for a tsunami, find out about local tsunami safety. Your hotel or campground may be able to provide you with tsunami warning and evacuation information. It is important to know this information before a warning is issued. You may not have a lot of time after a warning. You do not want to waste it figuring out what to do.
    Boat and marine safety require specialized equiment Boating & Marine First Aid Kits
    Boat, Marine, & Coast Guard First Aid Kits - Adventure Medical, Lifeline and more:
    Boat, Boating and Marine First Aid Kits. Life Boat Kits with waterproof packaging. Handy Soft pack boat first aid kits - Inner waterproof bags keep contents dry; reflective piping on outer bag makes the kit easy to find in the dark. The U.S. Coast Guard recommends these features for boating safety and marine vessels... Marine Safety means Safe Boating!
    We offer the most complete selections of Marine first aid kits & Boat first aid kits. Whether a part of your marine survival kit, or just to make sure you have everything on your marine first aid kit list, these boat emergency kits were designed with the marine first aid kit contents lists needed to meet marine first aid kit requirements.

    If you are on a boat and you get a tsunami warning, your response will depend on the size of the tsunami, the currents it produces, where you are, how much time you have before the first wave arrives and the weather at sea. If you are a boat owner or captain:

    • Make sure you have a way to receive tsunami warnings when you are on the water. The U.S. Coast Guard will issue urgent marine information broadcasts on your marine VHF radio's channel 16. Additional information will be available from NOAA Weather Radio.
    • Find out how to respond to a tsunami warning and what to do if you are at sea when a damaging tsunami strikes your coast. Your harbor master, port captain, the U.S. Coast Guard and local and state emergency management offices are the best sources for tsunami safety information and regulations for boaters in your area.
    • Make a plan and put together a disaster supplies kit to keep on board your boat. Be sure this includes a proper marine first aid kit. Be aware that shore facilities may be damaged, so if you are at sea during a tsunami, you may not be able to return to the harbor you left. Be prepared to remain at sea for a day or more.

    We are located in coastal San Diego, and see how silly and unprepared people can be - during tsunami warnings, we see many rushing to the water to watch, rather than away from the danger. During a tsunami, dangerous coastal flooding and powerful currents are possible and may continue for several hours or days after initial arrival. The first wave may not be the last or the largest. Follow directions and respond to tsunami warnings when given...

    How you respond to a tsunami warning depends on where you are and how you receive the warning. There are two types of tsunami warnings, official and natural. Both are equally important and suggest the potential for a tsunami that may cause widespread flooding. You may not get both types of warnings. Be prepared to respond to whatever you hear or see first. For your safety and others, always follow instructions from local officials.

    If you are outside of the tsunami hazard or evacuation zone and you receive an official or natural tsunami warning, a tsunami is possible or likely, but you are in a safe place. Stay where you are unless local officials tell you otherwise.

    Official Tsunami Warning

    If you are anywhere in a tsunami hazard or evacuation zone or a low-lying coastal area and you receive an official tsunami warning, a tsunami is likely. The warning will estimate the tsunami's arrival time, describe potential impacts and recommend actions to take.

    • Stay out of the water and away from beaches and waterways.
    • Get more information about the threat and what to do from NOAA Weather Radio, local radio or television or your mobile device (text or data). Limit nonemergency phone calls to keep the lines open for emergency communications.
    • If local officials ask you to evacuate, implement your emergency plan and move quickly to your safe place outside the hazard or evacuation zone unless officials tell you to go somewhere else. If you do not have a safe place or cannot reach it, follow evacuation signs to safety or go as high or as far inland (away from the water) as possible.

    Natural Tsunami Warning

    If you are in a tsunami hazard or evacuation zone or a low-lying coastal area and you feel a strong or long earthquake, the ocean acts strange (e.g., it looks like a fast-rising flood or a wall of water or it drains away suddenly, showing the ocean floor like a very low tide) OR there is a loud roar coming from the ocean, a tsunami is possible and could arrive within minutes.

    • In case of an earthquake, protect yourself. Drop, cover and hold on. Be prepared for aftershocks, which happen frequently after earthquakes. Each time the earth shakes, drop, cover and hold on.
    • Do not wait for an official tsunami warning or for instructions from local officials.
    • As soon as you can move safely, implement your emergency plan and move quickly to your safe place outside the hazard or evacuation zone. If you do not have a safe place or cannot reach it, follow evacuation signs to safety or go as high or as far inland (away from the water) as possible.
    • When you are in a safe place, get more information about the threat and what to do from NOAA Weather Radio, local radio or television or your mobile device (text or data). Limit nonemergency phone calls to keep the lines open for emergency communications.
    • If there is earthquake damage, avoid fallen power lines and stay away from buildings, bridges and piers because heavy objects may fall from them during an aftershock.
    • Follow instructions from local officials. It is their job to keep you safe.
    • Stay out of the tsunami hazard or evacuation zone until local officials tell you it is safe. The first wave may not be the last or the largest and the danger may last for hours or days.

    Note: If you are on the beach or near the water and feel an earthquake—no matter how big or how long it lasts—move quickly off the beach to high ground or inland (away from the water) as soon as you can do so safely.

  • The Fire Triangle

    Fire_triangleIn order to understand how fire extinguishers work, you first need to know a little bit about fire. Four things must be present at the same time in order to produce fire:

    • Enough oxygen to sustain combustion,
    • Enough heat to raise the material to its ignition temperature,
    • Some sort of fuel or combustible material, and
    • The chemical, exothermic reaction that is fire.

    Oxygen, heat, and fuel are frequently referred to as the "fire triangle." Add in the fourth element, the chemical reaction, and you actually have a fire "tetrahedron." The important thing to remember is: take any of these four things away, and you will not have a fire or the fire will be extinguished.

    Get your home fire safety and evacuation ready! Get your home fire safety and evacuation ready!

    Essentially, fire extinguishers put out fire by taking away one or more elements of the fire triangle/tetrahedron.

    Fire safety, at its most basic, is based upon the principle of keeping fuel sources and ignition sources separate.

    Fire Extinguishers - OSHA Safety Training: Among all the safety problems an employee can encounter, fire can be the most frightening. Every year fires cause hundreds of millions of dollars in damage and result in thousands of employee injuries, a number of which are fatal. Yet many of these catastrophes could have been prevented if the fire had been extinguished before it started to spread.

    Classifications of Fuels

    Not all fuels are the same, and if you use the wrong type of fire extinguisher on the wrong type of fuel, you can, in fact, make matters worse. It is therefore very important to understand the four different classifications of fuel.

    Class A - Wood, paper, cloth, trash, plastics.  Solid combustible materials that are not metals.

    Class B - Flammable liquids: gasoline, oil, grease, acetone.  Any non-metal in a liquid state, on fire.

    Class C - Electrical: energized electrical equipment.  As long as it's "plugged in," it would be considered a class C fire.

    Class D - Metals: potassium, sodium, aluminum, magnesium
    Unless you work in a laboratory or in an industry that uses these materials, it is unlikely you'll have to deal with a Class D fire. It takes special extinguishing agents (Metal-X, foam) to fight such a fire.

    Fire Extinguishers & Fire Prevention - OSHA Safety Training:

    Our training products on "Using Fire Extinguishers" look at why things burn, review the types of fire extinguishers that are found in facilities today, and discuss how to use fire extinguishers to fight small fires. Topics covered in these products include:

    • What causes things to burn.
    • The concept of "flashpoint".
    • "Classes" of fires.
    • Fire extinguisher labels.
    • Chemical fire extinguishers.
    • Water fire extinguishers.
    • How to use a fire extinguisher.
    • and more.

    Fire Prevention - Office, Industrial & Healthcare Environments - OSHA Safety Training: Among all the safety problems an employee can encounter, fire can be the most frightening. Every year fires in businesses and healthcare facilities cause millions of dollars in damage and result in hundreds of injuries, a number of which are fatal. Yet many employees do not realize how their own actions, or inactions, can contribute to the risk of fire.

    See our Fire Prevention & Safety Training Materials! See our Fire Prevention & Safety Training Materials!

    Our training products on "Fire Prevention" look at how fires start, review steps that can be taken to help prevent fires and discuss what employees should do in case of a fire emergency. Topics covered in these products include:

    • Common causes of fires.
    • Preventing fires.
    • The concept of "flashpoint".
    • "Classes" of fires.
    • Fire extinguishers.
    • Handling flammable materials.
    • Evacuation and other employee responsibilities.
    • First aid.
    • and more.

    Learn about Fire Prevention, Fire Suppression and Fire Extinguisher use. Get a Quote for a Class:
    Fire Extinguishers and/or Fire Prevention Live Instruction Training Courses at YOUR Location

  • Make a Fire Escape Plan

    More than 15,925 people were injured by fire in the United States in 2013, according to the U.S. Fire Administration. If a fire breaks out in your home, you may have as little as two minutes to safely escape once the alarm sounds.

    When fire strikes, deadly smoke can fill your home within minutes. That's why we want you to plan and practice home fire drills. Watch this 30 second video for life-saving tips on how to make a home fire escape plan.

    safety_tips_escape_plan.Planning can help protect you, your family, and your home when seconds count. Here are a few steps to help keep your family fire safe:

    • Check that all smoke alarms are working properly;
    • Make a map of your home and mark all windows and doors through which you may escape;
    • Choose a meeting place outside the home where firefighters can see you and your family;
    • Write the emergency telephone number for your fire department on your escape plan;
    • Practice your fire escape drill; and
    • Keep your fire escape plan in a common area where everyone can see it, i.e. refrigerator.

    For more information about protecting your family and developing a fire escape plan, check out the home fire escape materials from the U.S. Fire Administration.

    Handouts to share in your community

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