ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard Minimum Requirements  Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies - Buy new ANSI Kits
ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard Minimum Requirements Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies - Buy new ANSI Kits

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  • You may THINK your first aid kit is compliant...

    So you THINK your first aid kit is compliant...

    Think again.

    When OSHA comes calling, they usually check your first aid kit or cabinet.
    You may have ordered an OSHA & ANSI compliant kit, but is it really compliant? The Inspector will know if not. Some things to consider:

    1) Most common off-the-shelf non-compliance: The vast majority of “ANSI Compliant” first aid kits and cabinets on the market do not contain a current/compliant first aid guide… the Manufacturers claim the kits are up to date, but frankly, there are very few guides available to kit builders that have the required ANSI content in them.

    ANSI REQUIRES that your first aid guide covers (at minimum):

    • Emergency steps of assessing the scene and person, calling 9-1-1 or location emergency number
    • Establishing responsiveness
    • Establishing and maintaining an open and clear airway
    • Performing rescue breathing
    • Treating airway obstruction in a conscious victim
    • Performing CPR
    • Using an AED
    • Recognizing the signs and symptoms of shock and providing first aid for shock from illness or injury
    • Assessing and treating a victim who has an unexplained change in level of consciousness or sudden illness
    • Controlling bleeding with direct pressure
    • Poisoning
    • Responding to medical emergencies
      • Chest pain
      • Stroke
      • Breathing problems
      • Anaphylactic reaction
      • Hypoglycemia in diabetics taking insulin
      • Seizures
      • Reduced level of consciousness
      • Impaled object
    • Wounds
      • Assessment and treatment of first aid wounds including abrasions, cuts, lacerations, punctures, avulsions, amputations and crush injuries
      • Principles of wound care including infection precautions
      • Principles of body substance isolation, universal precautions, and use of PPE
    • Burns
      • Assessment of the severity of a burn, including extent (size) and depth
      • Recognizing whether a burn is thermal, electrical, or chemical and the appropriate first aid
    • Temperature extremes
      • Exposure to cold, including frostbite and hypothermia
      • Exposure to heat, including heat cramps, heat exhaustion, and heat stroke
    • Musculoskeletal injuries
      • Fractures
      • Sprains, strains, contusions, and cramps
      • Head, neck, back, and spinal injuries
    • Eye injuries
    • Mouth and teeth injuries
      • Oral injuries, lip and tongue injuries, broken and missing teeth
    • Bites and stings
      • Human and animal bites
      • Bites and stings from insects; instruction in first aid treatment for anaphylacsis

    Replace your first aid guide with a fully OSHA & ANSI compliant guide for $1.50 (as low as 68¢ each!)

    2) Second most common non-compliance: Missing Items. If you bought a first aid kit or cabinet to comply with the latest requirements you need to make sure it has the minimum fill at all times!

    3) Third most common non-compliance: Wrong Class kit. Do you need Class A or Class B?
    The 2015 ANSI revision introduced two classes of first aid kits:
    Class A kits with content designed to deal with most common types of workplace injuries.
    Class B kits with a broader range and quantity of supplies to deal with injuries more complex or in high-risk environments.
    Don’t skimp – if “borderline” or unsure – go for Class B.
    In deciding which class of kit is more appropriate for a given workplace... employers should consider the risks and task load of the work environment and the potential severity and likelihood of occurrence of an injury. Employers should also consider whether multiple first aid kits are needed, based on the number of employees, physical layout of the work environment, and the remoteness of the worksite to emergency services. These same considerations can be taken into account when determining if a first aid kit should be augmented with additional supplies.

    Want to learn more? Read about OSHA First Aid vs. ANSI First Aid.

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  • The $19.99 solution to OSHA & ANSI First Aid Kit Compliance

    When ANSI rolled out the new Minimum Requirements for Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies, twice, in 2014 & 2015 - which went into effect June 2016...people worried.

    The new standards require substantially more first aid content for workplace first aid kits. Logically, this means much higher prices for business first aid kits...

    Luckily, there is an affordable solution. Businesses with 25 or fewer employees, and "typical" workplace activities can easily comply with the Urgent First Aid™ Basic ANSI first Aid kit for $19.99 (or less) - general work environments with more than 25 employees and guests on premises can place multiple units for easy access .

    Worried about ANSI and OSHA requirements? This is our most affordable complete ANSI/OSHA first aid kit! Made right here in the USA, this Urgent First Aid kit is our best value plastic ANSI Class A first aid kit. It meets or exceeds the most recent OSHA and ANSI 2015 Standard fill requirements, with contents designed to deal with most common types of workplace injuries so you know you and your employees will be covered with the new ANSI 2015 requirements. Under the new ANSI Standard Minimum Requirements for Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies guidelines, general requirements include the following items: Adhesive bandages, adhesive tape, antibiotic application, antiseptic, a breathing barrier, burn dressing (gel soaked), burn treatment, cold packs, eye covering, eye/skin wash, first aid guide, hand sanitizer, medical exam gloves, roller bandages, scissors, sterile pads, trauma pads, and triangular bandages. In addition the location of the kit must be easily accessible. This ANSI Class A first aid kit is great for small offices and general workplaces of up to 25 people, it is easily wall mounted, and can also be quickly removed to be taken to the accident scene. Worried about ANSI and OSHA requirements? This is our most affordable complete ANSI/OSHA first aid kit! Made right here in the USA, this Urgent First Aid kit is our best value plastic ANSI Class A first aid kit. It meets or exceeds the most recent OSHA and ANSI 2015 Standard fill requirements, with contents designed to deal with most common types of workplace injuries so you know you and your employees will be covered with the new ANSI 2015 requirements. Under the new ANSI Standard Minimum Requirements for Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies guidelines, general requirements include the following items: Adhesive bandages, adhesive tape, antibiotic application, antiseptic, a breathing barrier, burn dressing (gel soaked), burn treatment, cold packs, eye covering, eye/skin wash, first aid guide, hand sanitizer, medical exam gloves, roller bandages, scissors, sterile pads, trauma pads, and triangular bandages. In addition the location of the kit must be easily accessible. This ANSI Class A first aid kit is great for small offices and general workplaces of up to 25 people, it is easily wall mounted, and can also be quickly removed to be taken to the accident scene.

    ANSI decided to establish two classes of specific first aid kits,  Class A and Class B. These kits have been classified into four kit case types as well - depending on the work setting and ensuring that each kit contained both a variety and an adequate supply of the essential items needed to deal with the most common types of injuries and/or illnesses that could occur at a workplace.

    Class A kits are considered more basic for most general settings.
    Class B kits have a larger variety of items and extra supply for workplace settings that are considered higher-risk or industry specific.

    If you are not sure if you should have this Class A or a more robust Class B ANSI First Aid Kit, Read our helpful information about ANSI Z308.1-2015.

    Urgent First Aid™ also offers, ANSI A & B Refill/upgrade packs, and ANSI first aid kits meeting class A & B requirements for 10,  25, and 50 people in metal or plastic - and ANSI First Aid Cabinets, too.

    Urgent First Aid™ Bulk First Aid Kit, Metal, 198 Pieces, ANSI B, Types I II, 50 Person Urgent First Aid™ Bulk First Aid Kit, Metal, 198 Pieces, ANSI B, TYes I II, 50 Person

    Frequently asked questions on OSHA and ANSI, and what you need to know about compliance... What are the OSHA regulations for workplace first aid kits? What about ANSI requirements and ISEA guidelines?

    OSHA (U.S Department of Labor Occupational Safety & Health Administration) is the main federal agency charged with the enforcement of safety and health legislation. OSHA regulations regarding ?rst aid kits are contained in the Code of Federal Regulations under section 29 CFR 1910.151 and in Appendix A. OSHA does not provide speci?cations for ?rst aid kit contents per se but de?nes mandatory requirements for availability of kits on worksites. In Appendix A of the OSHA guidelines, ANSI is referenced as the originator of ?rst aid kit speci?cations and minimum contents requirements.

    NEW! Read about the just-released 2015 ISEA / ANSI Guidelines!

  • Training for New Emergency Managers

    While every new Safety Manager needs an OSHA Dictionary, and the OSHA Safety Orders... there's a lot more to it than that!

    OSHA DictionaryFEMA’s National Emergency Management Basic Academy is the entry point for individuals pursuing a career in emergency management. The Basic Academy offers the tools to develop comprehensive foundational skills needed in emergency management. For those who are new to emergency management, the Basic Academy also provides a unique opportunity to build camaraderie, to establish professional contacts, and to understand the roles, responsibilities, and legal boundaries associated with emergency management.

    The Basic Academy curriculum consists of five courses: Foundations of Emergency Management; Science of Disaster; Planning: Emergency Operations; Exercise Design; and Public Information and Warning. Upcoming courses in the program are Science of Disaster, a three-day, 24-hour training being held August 8-10, followed by the Planning course, a two-day, 16-hour training being offered August 11-12. Applications for both courses are due by June 27. The courses will be delivered by the Emergency Management Institute at FEMA’s National Emergency Training Center in Emmitsburg, Maryland. For more information, visit the EMI website or send an email to FEMA-EMPP-Basic-Academy@fema.dhs.gov. Note: courses may be taken even when participants are not planning to receive a Basic Academy certification.

    The Basic Academy is the first of a three-level Academy series in the Emergency Management Professional Program (EMPP). The EMPP curriculum is designed to provide a lifetime of learning for emergency management professionals and includes three separate, but closely threaded, training programs. The program builds from the Basic Academy to the National Emergency Management Advanced Academy, a program to develop the next generation of emergency management leaders who are trained in advanced concepts and issues, advanced leadership and management, and critical thinking and problem solving. The EMPP culminates in the National Emergency Management Executive Academy, a program designed to challenge and enhance the talents of the nation’s emergency management senior executives through critical thinking, visionary strategic planning, challenging conventional concepts, and negotiation and conflict resolution applied to complex real-world problems.

    Emergency management professionals should visit www.training.fema.gov/empp for more information about which academy best suits their needs.

    OSHA Dictionary

    This is the OSHA reference book every safety professional needs. This one-of-a-kind book contains ALL the terms and definitions from OSHA 29 CFR Parts 1903, 1904, 1910, and 1926 (inspections, recordkeeping, general industry, and construction). Look up a term and discover its different definitions in various sections of OSHA. For instance, "competent person" has 6 different definitions from 9 different OSHA regulations, and each one is listed. The definitions are also followed by the section and paragraph number of the regulations from which they were taken. Important related tables and illustrations have been included to aid in understanding.

  • New 2015 OSHA/ANSI First Aid Compliance

    Click to see the NEW OSHA ANSI First Aid Kits! Click to see the NEW OSHA ANSI First Aid Kits!

    Well, last Friday it became Official.
    Business First Aid Kits are no longer compliant, unless upgraded t o the new minimum fill requirements.

    New ANSI Standards for First Aid Kits
    The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) has changed the standard for first aid kits in the workplace.  The new standard went into effect June 17, 2016.  Are you ready for the change?

    Meet the New OSHA Standards 
    We offer a full line of kits to help meet the new ANSI standard and OSHA regulations.  Our professional customer service sales teams are ready for your questions.  Just give us a call today Toll Free (800) 933-8495.

    Some businesses will need 145 new items
    Depending on the type of business and number of employees, owners and managers will need to augment their current first aid kits with anywhere from a few dozen to 145 new items. Businesses that qualify to use class A ANSI first aid kits will need 22 more items, while Class B kits and cabinets will require 145 additional items.  In deciding which class of kit is more appropriate for a given workplace, employers should consider the risks and task load of the work environment and the potential severity and likelihood of occurrence of an injury. Employers should also consider whether multiple first aid kits are needed, based on the number of employees, physical layout of the work environment and the remoteness of the worksite to emergency services.

    Click here to learn more about the new ANSI kits or order now.

    FAO_ANSI-First-Aid-Kit-Compilation

  • Beyond ANSI First Aid

    We've spent the last few weeks "Doing the ANSI Scramble" as our clients have been gearing up and either upgrading their first aid kits, or purchasing new ANSI 2015 first aid kits in order to comply with the new ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard— Minimum Requirements for Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies, which changes first aid kit requirements for every organization in the USA.

    But is that the end of it? It depends.

    First, there are special needs for certain types of businesses, especially ConstructionRestaurants and Foodservice, and companies with Commercial Fleet Vehicles or Trucking. Moreover, some States have additional requirements (California being a good example) and OSHA and various States have special first aid kit and supply requirements for Logging operations and other specialty fields of work.

    And then... there's the new ANSI Standard itself. While it specifies the exact minimum content for business first aid kits, it leaves it up to the employer to decide whthere the should get a Class A or Class B first aid kit and further which type of first aid kit case.

    ANSI says:

    In deciding which class of kit is more appropriate for a given workplace, employers should consider the risks and task load of the work environment and the potential severity and likelihood of occurrence of an injury. Employers should also consider whether multiple first aid kits are needed, based on the number of employees, physical layout of the work environment and the remoteness of the worksite to emergency services.

    Further, they note that an employer may wish to add yet more content to augment the minimum fill for specific situational needs: "These same considerations can be taken into account when determining if a first aid kit should be augmented with additional supplies, as noted in the appendix of this standard."

    The additional first aid supplies they list (and thereby implicitly recommend) are:

    Supplemental First Aid Supplies for Consideration – Applicable Environments

    It is recognized that each work environment is unique and it is expected that a first aid kit containing the minimum required first aid supplies will be augmented with additional items or additional quantities of required supplies based upon the specific hazards existing in a workplace environment. The selection of such items should be based on the recommendation and consultation of a person competent in first aid and cognizant of the hazards and on the number of people found in the workplace. Federal, state and local requirements should be consulted, where appropriate. Augment kits with the following first aid supplies, as applicable:

    FIRST AID SUPPLY PURPOSE
    Low dose aspirin Used to treat suspected heart attack
    Hemostatic agent For individuals with compromised clotting or uncontrollable bleeding
    Electrolyte replacement Heat-stress related injuries
    Glucose replacement Diabetic or hypoglycemic episodes
    Analgesics (oral and/or topical)/anti-inflammatory Pain management; swelling control
    Hydrocortisone Itchiness and skin-related reactions including rashes
    Antihistamine Allergic reactions
    Foil blanket Treat shock and/or cold-stress related injuries

     

    OSHAS

  • Workplace First Aid Kit Regulations require updated content by Friday...

    Get your new first aid ordered by Friday to avoid fines!

    The ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard— Minimum Requirements for Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies are effective this Friday. What does that mean? It means that your previously OSHA & ANSI compliant first aid kits and cabinets are no longer compliant! Whether you are in one of the 28 US States and Territories with their own State Plan, or if you are anywhere in the remaining US and fall directly under the Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Act doesn’t really matter. All these plans have either adopted ANSI Standards as their outright guideline, or refer to these standards as the basis for the “minimum fill” requirements for compliance. The new ANSI First Aid Standard requires more and different content than previously “compliant” kits have in them.
    See your compliance options below, or read more about OSHA & ANSI First Aid requirements.

    Our Recommended Solutions – any of these 3 easy options!

    Economy Solution: For typical work environments

    ANSI 2015 Class A Refill/Upgrade Pack:
    Just $19.99 (as low as $14.18 in quantity!)

    Add this to your first aid kit or cabinet (or replace entire content) for full ANSI Class A compliance! (Fits in most kit cases of 9” x 7” x 3” or larger)


    Heavy Duty Economy Solution:
    For workplace settings that are considered higher-risk or industry specific

    ANSI 2015 Class B Refill/Upgrade Pack:
    Just $49.60 (as low as $34.72 in quantity!)

    Add this to your first aid kit or cabinet (or replace entire content) for full ANSI Class B compliance! (Fits in most kit cases of 9” x 13” x 3” or larger)


    Complete Economy  Solution:
    For typical work environments

    ANSI 2015 Class A, Type I & II in metal or plastic kit case!

    Plastic: Just $19.99 (as low as $14.18 in quantity!)
    Metal: Just $29.99 (as low as $22.62 in quantity!)


    Complete
    Heavy Duty Economy Solution
    For workplace settings that are considered higher-risk or industry specific

    ANSI 2015 Class B, Type I & II in metal or plastic kit case!

    Plastic: Just $65.50 (as low as $45.85 in quantity!)
    Metal: Just $77.90 (as low as $54.53 in quantity!)


    Choose from over 100 different ANSI 2015 Compliant First Aid Kits, Cabinets, Refills Packs & Upgrade sets! Option from 10-200+ people served, Plastic or metal, Class A or B, Types I-IV, even Bilingual kits, Construction, Restaurant, and Vehicle in several colors, wall mountable, weatherproof and even soft bag ANSI Kits! Click here and use the easy-filtering navigation on the left to find exactly the kit you want or need! Starting at $11.97.



    Get your ANSI 2015 Upgrade pack designed specifically for these kits!


    Now – since you read all the way to the bottom… we’ll offer you an extra 10% off our already super-low wholesale direct to the public pricing when you place your order on or before the compliance deadline of 6/17/16! Enter code “Comply” in your shopping cart (not at checkout) or when you call toll free to place an order!

    The (Not So) Fine Print

    Offer expires at Midnight 6/17/16 – Available Online or Toll Free - Offer cannot be combined with any other offers or incentives. Offer cannot be applied to completed orders. While supplies last, offer subject to substitution or change without notice, call with questions or for further details.

    Valid ONLY on ANSI 2015 compliant first aid kits, cabinets, and refill/upgrade packs.

  • Injury Free? Safety is not just a number

    Safety is what? Safety is a goal. Safety is a mentality. Safety is effort. Safety is a work in progress. Safety is something every company should treasure. A quick look around and you’ll see professionals, organizations, schools and businesses touting their unwavering dedication to safety. But what does that mean? Some will point to their low incident rates. Some will focus on record keeping and low fatality statistics. Whatever your definition of safety may be, in order to achieve your safety goals, you’re going to need everyone on board. So how do you create a genuine safety culture?

    Alignment – The Safety Mantra

    safety-scoreboard-large-display-stoplight-scrolling-messageYour first step is to get everyone on the same page regarding what it is you consider a safe environment. If you are focusing on injury free days, is everyone in your company clear on what constitutes an injury? When they take a look at your new days since last accident sign, what do those numbers mean? Is an injury any incident that results in time off work? Is an injury any accident that involves administration of first aid? The answers to these questions will vary depending on where you are in the process. Set reasonable goals and get everyone involved from the start. If you had a lost time incident last month, focus on lost time injuries. If your last lost time accident was five years ago, you’re doing great, but it’s time to do better. Start focusing on any injuries that require first aid. The key here is to set reasonably achievable and clearly defined safety goals.

    Here is an example of a reasonable mantra.

    • All lost time injuries are preventable
    • Every individual is responsible for their own safety and the safety of others
    • Injuries will never be considered “part of doing business”
    • Regular safety meetings will provide a forum for blame free open communication about all safety concerns
    • Every employee is entitled to take action when witnessing potentially unsafe behaviors or conditions

    Ownership

    You’re not operating in a bubble and there is ‘real business’ to be done. You must find ways to continually engage your employees and give them ownership of the process. You are striving for a culture where your employees choose to follow the rules and procedures because they own and genuinely value their safety, and not because it’s been mandated from on high.

    Commit to ensuring that every employee goes home safe each and every day. Encourage employees to take responsibility for their behaviors by celebrating those who identify hazards and report and/or fix them as they are discovered. Give them the freedom and courage to speak up or take action when they witness unsafe behaviors secure in the knowledge that they have the full backing of management.

    Hard Work

    You must support your safety goals with action and hard work. Remember your goal is a safe work environment. Creating and maintaining a culture that strives for continual improvement demands taking action and demonstrating care on a daily basis. Policies, procedures, and zero incident rhetoric mean nothing if not backed by genuine concern and a commitment at all levels.

    Rinse & Repeat

    So you’ve met your goals. You’ve talked with employees and are confident everyone is on board. You’re injury statistics are trending down, and concerns at regular safety meetings are few and far between. Now it’s time to hone those goals and repeat the process with new and improved objectives. Until you’ve stopped ordering band aids, your job is never done.

    Learn more: ACCIDENTS – It Can’t Happen to Me

    OSHA Safety Training & DOT, Oil & Gas, Maritime, Forklift, Construction & HAZMAT From OSHA Safety Series Training and Federal Title 29 CFR to Forklift Safety, to Petrochemical and Maritime OSHA Compliance, we have Books, Manuals, CDs, DVDs, Videos, Training Materials, Safety Kits, Forms, Safety Posters & much more to make sure that your are compliant with not only the Department of Labor and Department of Transportation rules and regulations but also keeping you properly informed about how to properly protect your workforce on a day-to-day basis. Whether its a construction site, hauling hazardous waste or working as a longshoreman, there are specific federal rules and regulations that need to be followed and kept up-to-date with. We are here to make sure that you have available the most most up-to-date, thorough, yet easy to understand material and information on the ever-changing codes of the CFR. Books, DVDs, Update Services on DOT/49 CFR Standards, Petrochemical and Maritime Regulations, Cal/OSHA Safety Regulations, 1910 and 1926 Parts and much more! OSHA Safety Training & DOT, Oil & Gas, Maritime, Forklift, Construction & HAZMAT
    From OSHA Safety Series Training and Federal Title 29 CFR to Forklift Safety, to Petrochemical and Maritime OSHA Compliance, we have Books, Manuals, CDs, DVDs, Videos, Training Materials, Safety Kits, Forms, Safety Posters & much more to make sure that your are compliant with not only the Department of Labor and Department of Transportation rules and regulations but also keeping you properly informed about how to properly protect your workforce on a day-to-day basis. Whether its a construction site, hauling hazardous waste or working as a longshoreman, there are specific federal rules and regulations that need to be followed and kept up-to-date with. We are here to make sure that you have available the most most up-to-date, thorough, yet easy to understand material and information on the ever-changing codes of the CFR.
    Books, DVDs, Update Services on DOT/49 CFR Standards, Petrochemical and Maritime Regulations, Cal/OSHA Safety Regulations, 1910 and 1926 Parts and much more!
  • OSHA Recordkeeping Compliance: Completing and Maintaining the OSHA 300 Log

    OSHA Log Books, Update Services & Regulations - Federal OSHA 29 / CFR Standards OSHA Log Books, Update Services & Regulations - Federal OSHA 29 / CFR Standards

    Confusion among employers over which forms should be used to initially report injuries and illness, and those that should be used for submission to OSHA or the proper reporting agency may result in problems. Any gaps in your OSHA 300 log can trigger OSHA inquiries or even inspections.

    Accurate reporting is imperative, and is a good tool to use in determining problem areas in the company’s business operation. So, prepare now to fill in the missing information as soon as possible.

    OSHA 1910 GENERAL INDUSTRY & OSHA 1926 CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY: As an employer, one of your top priorities and responsibilities is to make sure that your company is staying compliant with OSHA Mandates and protecting your workforce. CFR Title 29 - Labor are the principle set of rules and regulations issued by federal agencies used for protecting the workforce in our country. We offer an abundance of products and materials that pertain to two major parts of CFR Title 29: OSHA 1910 General Industry and OSHA 1926 Construction Industry. These products, many which come in book and CD-ROM form, are key in helping you make sure you as a safety professional stay OSHA compliant with the most up to date safety and health information in both General Industry and Construction. Among Compliance Kits, logbooks and OSHA Dictionaries,we also have Update Services, which allow you the luxury to stay current with the ever changing federal labor regulations!

    Federal OSHA 29 CFR 1910 & 1926

  • How to Manage OSHA Inspections and Investigations

    Perhaps of all of the interactions that occur with regulatory agencies, the unannounced OSHA inspection is the most stressful, and least understood by business owners. The key to managing a surprise OSHA Inspection or a letter of complaint directed at your company is to understand what the process is and what the OSHA inspectors are looking for.

    Some "Easy Steps to Avoid OSHA Issues" include:

    • Make sure to OSHA Records are always up to date
    • Have OSHA Compliant First Aid kits and Cabinets stocked and ready
    • Keep staff current on Safety Training

    Accident-Investigation


    Accident Investigation - OSHA Safety Training: "Accidents will happen". We have all heard that statement before. Unfortunately, sometimes it is true. In spite of our best efforts, things occasionally do go wrong. While many accidents seem to happen for obvious reasons, there may be things that contribute to an accident which are not always apparent. That is why it is vital to conduct a thorough Accident Investigation.

    Our training products on "Accident Investigation" show employees steps that are taken in an accident investigation, and highlight how important it is for employees to fully cooperate with any inquiry. They also point out that while an investigation's focus is to determine the cause of an accident, the overall goal is to prevent similar accidents from happening again. The topics covered in the products include:

    • ~ The goals of an accident investigation.
    • ~ Securing an accident scene.
    • ~ "Root-cause" analysis.
    • ~ The importance of investigative interviews.
    • ~ Assisting in an accident investigation.
    • ~ Reporting the "near misses".
    • ~ The role of policies, equipment and training on accident prevention.
    • ,,,and more.

    Get a Quote for a Class:
    Accident Investigation Live Instruction Training Courses at YOUR Location


     

    Consider the "triggers" and events that occur during an inspection by OSHA. Learn ways to mitigate the results of an inspection, and the consequences of an inspection. Fines and possible penalties are also discussed.

    Know the reasons for an OSHA inspection and ways to attempt to prevent an inspection from occurring. However, should an inspection occur, manage an inspection to reduce the negative results that may occur, as well reducing penalties and fines. Know the current fees associated with the various types of findings in an OSHA inspection.

    What is the process is for an OSHA inspection? How should you respond to a letter of complaint?  Research the helpful resources at OSHA provided so that business owners and safety personnel have a better understanding and feel more in control of the situation when OSHA inspectors arrive at on-site, especially if they arrive unannounced.

    Points to consider:

    • Steps to take to avoid an OSHA Inspection
    • Understand the reasons for an OSHA Inspection
    • Understand what the inspector will do during the inspection
    • Help you understand how employees and unions fit into the inspection
    • Learn what to expect during an OSHA visit
    • Decide how to conduct yourself during a surprise inspection
    • Steps to take to avoid as many problems as possible during the inspection
    • Steps to take immediately following the inspection

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