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safety

  • Location, Location, Location

    In real estate, the three rules are "Location, Location, Location"... while these may not be the only three rules in Disaster, Survival, and Preparedness, and maybe not even amongst the top  three, nevertheless, assuring that your property is as ready as you are for an emergency is critical.

    When discussing businesses, preparing a location in advance for quick response and recovery to a calamity is part of what is called mitigation. The same principles should be applied to your home and neighborhood.

    Some simple actions you can take include:

    ?     Check your roof... Don't take your roof for granted. It needs to be checked, fixed and, if necessary, replaced over a number of years.  A chain is only as strong as its weakest link, and your shelter from the storm is only as strong as the flimsiest portion - your roof will keep in heat, keep rain, snow, and debris out, and protect you from the elements - make sure it is strong enough to withstand any storm and well insulated.
    ?     Fix those Windows.. You may not be in an area that required storm windows, but your windows should be storm-ready anyway. Make sure they are well sealed, functioning, and secure... loose windows will not only let in dust and moisture  - the can rattle and break causing dangerous shards in a storm or earthquake.
    ?     Clean your yard... Your yard is integral to your home safety - make sure dead or dying plants are cleared to avoid fire hazards, trim any tree limbs or other planting that could fall and damage your home or roots that could encroach on your foundation - and clear all storm drains at and downstream from your home to avoid any backup and flooding risks.
    ?     Cycle through your batteries, food, water, and be sure to check your flashlights, radios, and emergency supplies every time you change your clocks.
    ?     Have the utility company out for a free electrical safety checks - gas and water utilities will usually do the same.
    ?     Home, Safe, Home - make sure yours is.

    NPM-PropertyMake property improvements to reduce potential injury and property damage (mitigation).

    Each How To Prepare guide provides information on how to reduce property damage and potential injury from each hazard. Visit the “Take Action” section of ready.gov/prepare for more information

     

  • Traffic

    stopliteHappy birthday to an item that most people see as a daily annoyance ... the traffic signal. On this day in 1914, the world's first electric traffic signal was installed in Cleveland, Ohio. It is hard to imagine life before we had those three lights telling us to slow down, stop or when to go, but back before 1914, navigating America's roadways was no easy feat. Sure there were a lot less cars on the road than today, but cars had to compete with pedestrians, bicycles, streetcars and even horse-drawn carriages for the right of way. Nowadays, some estimates claim the average person spends six months of their life waiting at traffic lights. So why not throw a birthday party for something you spend half a year of your life with? It's as good a reason as any to eat a cupcake.

    Image of a carAuto Emergency Kits & Auto Survival Kits: Discount and Wholesale Auto First Aid Kits designed specifically for use in and around your car. These Automotive First Aid kits contain a variety of first aid supplies to treat minor injuries as well as supplies for responding to major roadside emergencies. Some of our Auto, Car, Truck & Vehicle First Aid kits include motion sickness tablets. We have soft sided and hard case auto / vehicle first aid kits designed to fit in spaces in any auto, car, truck, sport utility vehicle, mini-van, etc...From Lifeline, First Aid Only, AAA and more!

    Don't miss our Auto Survival Kits & Emergency Car Tools, too! (Window punches, Seat belt cutters, warning and signaling devices for roadside distress)

    Car First Aid kits, AAA Emergency Kits, and Vehicle Survival Kits for emergencies on the road!

    Traffic

  • Boating Essentials for Fun & Safety

    We all know the basics when you head out on the water, right? Hat, sunscreen, sunglasses - check. Life jacket, first aid kit - check. Now what else?

    Boat and marine safety require specialized equiment Boating & Marine First Aid Kits
    Boat, Marine, & Coast Guard First Aid Kits - Adventure Medical, Lifeline and more:
    Boat, Boating and Marine First Aid Kits. Life Boat Kits with waterproof packaging. Handy Soft pack boat first aid kits - Inner waterproof bags keep contents dry; reflective piping on outer bag makes the kit easy to find in the dark. The U.S. Coast Guard recommends these features for boating safety and marine vessels... Marine Safety means Safe Boating!
    We offer the most complete selections of Marine first aid kits & Boat first aid kits. Whether a part of your marine survival kit, or just to make sure you have everything on your marine first aid kit list, these boat emergency kits were designed with the marine first aid kit contents lists needed to meet marine first aid kit requirements.

    How about ponchos in case of a sudden squall? (and there are many, many, many other uses for ponchos, too)

    Motion Sickness tablets are a must-have. Even the most seaworthy mermaid can get queasy when the seas get angry.

    Fire on water? More common than you think - be sure you have a small, full charged fire extinguisher on board.

    While you may have marine radio on board, bring your cell phone, too - but a hint: seal it in a zipper top/water proof bag.

    You never have too many drinks, or too much food - think about how to keep it cool and water-tight, but don't skimp - not only does fresh air and activity stimulate the appetite, but you could get stranded or caught out longer than planned. Got enough water? Now double it.

    Paper towels and trash bags - here's another category where we have to say "Got enough? Double it."

    What else? Even if heading out for a quick morning or mid-day cruise, bring sweaters or light jackets, extra towels, and flashlights... even a few emergency blankets - they are small and cheap and have many uses beyond warmth such as emergency signalling or wrapping things up.

    Not sure about bringing something? Thinking "Aw - we probably won't need that, and there isn't a lot of extra space on the boat." Bring it - you won't regret it if you have it, but might if you don't.

    This is no means a comprehensive list of boating essential, but some food for thought. Think about your own needs and plans and assure you're covered from top to bottom before you sail off into the sunset (speaking of bottom, don't forget to bring along personal hygiene and sanitation supplies!)

  • Happy World Oceans Day!

    What is World Oceans Day?

    Canada initially proposed the international holiday in 1992 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil at the Earth Summit, though it was not recognized officially by the United States until 2008.

    Boat and marine safety require specialized equiment Boating & Marine First Aid Kits
    Boat, Marine, & Coast Guard First Aid Kits - Adventure Medical, Lifeline and more:
    Boat, Boating and Marine First Aid Kits. Life Boat Kits with waterproof packaging. Handy Soft pack boat first aid kits - Inner waterproof bags keep contents dry; reflective piping on outer bag makes the kit easy to find in the dark. The U.S. Coast Guard recommends these features for boating safety and marine vessels... Marine Safety means Safe Boating!
    We offer the most complete selections of Marine first aid kits & Boat first aid kits. Whether a part of your marine survival kit, or just to make sure you have everything on your marine first aid kit list, these boat emergency kits were designed with the marine first aid kit contents lists needed to meet marine first aid kit requirements.

    World Oceans Day is a global day of ocean celebration and collaboration for a better future. Their website serves as the central coordinating platform for World Oceans Day, with free resources and ideas for everyone – we are luck enough to have our organization located 1/2 mile from the Pacific, but no matter where you live – to help expand the reach and impact of World Oceans Day on June 8 and year round.

    This year's theme is “Healthy Oceans, Healthy Planet” and individuals and organizations across the planet are taking action for prevention of plastic pollution in our ocean.

    Celebrating marine life, foods and plant life that inhabit our world, Oceans Day pays tribute to the vast uniqueness and intrinsic value of our relationship with these bodies. Oceans cover more than 70 percent of the planet and 97 percent of Earth's water can be found in the oceans.
    Today the holiday is celebrated worldwide, promoting actions for making our oceans and planet healthier.

    World Oceans Day has grown tremendously each year since The Ocean Project started coordinating it in 2002. With hundreds of partners involved, and the United Nations officially recognizing June 8 as World Oceans Day in 2008, reaching millions worldwide. What can you do? Anything from plastic recycling to litter clean up and clearing yard debris helps - lean more - click the ocean.

    World Oceans Day

  • Injury Free? Safety is not just a number

    Safety is what? Safety is a goal. Safety is a mentality. Safety is effort. Safety is a work in progress. Safety is something every company should treasure. A quick look around and you’ll see professionals, organizations, schools and businesses touting their unwavering dedication to safety. But what does that mean? Some will point to their low incident rates. Some will focus on record keeping and low fatality statistics. Whatever your definition of safety may be, in order to achieve your safety goals, you’re going to need everyone on board. So how do you create a genuine safety culture?

    Alignment – The Safety Mantra

    safety-scoreboard-large-display-stoplight-scrolling-messageYour first step is to get everyone on the same page regarding what it is you consider a safe environment. If you are focusing on injury free days, is everyone in your company clear on what constitutes an injury? When they take a look at your new days since last accident sign, what do those numbers mean? Is an injury any incident that results in time off work? Is an injury any accident that involves administration of first aid? The answers to these questions will vary depending on where you are in the process. Set reasonable goals and get everyone involved from the start. If you had a lost time incident last month, focus on lost time injuries. If your last lost time accident was five years ago, you’re doing great, but it’s time to do better. Start focusing on any injuries that require first aid. The key here is to set reasonably achievable and clearly defined safety goals.

    Here is an example of a reasonable mantra.

    • All lost time injuries are preventable
    • Every individual is responsible for their own safety and the safety of others
    • Injuries will never be considered “part of doing business”
    • Regular safety meetings will provide a forum for blame free open communication about all safety concerns
    • Every employee is entitled to take action when witnessing potentially unsafe behaviors or conditions

    Ownership

    You’re not operating in a bubble and there is ‘real business’ to be done. You must find ways to continually engage your employees and give them ownership of the process. You are striving for a culture where your employees choose to follow the rules and procedures because they own and genuinely value their safety, and not because it’s been mandated from on high.

    Commit to ensuring that every employee goes home safe each and every day. Encourage employees to take responsibility for their behaviors by celebrating those who identify hazards and report and/or fix them as they are discovered. Give them the freedom and courage to speak up or take action when they witness unsafe behaviors secure in the knowledge that they have the full backing of management.

    Hard Work

    You must support your safety goals with action and hard work. Remember your goal is a safe work environment. Creating and maintaining a culture that strives for continual improvement demands taking action and demonstrating care on a daily basis. Policies, procedures, and zero incident rhetoric mean nothing if not backed by genuine concern and a commitment at all levels.

    Rinse & Repeat

    So you’ve met your goals. You’ve talked with employees and are confident everyone is on board. You’re injury statistics are trending down, and concerns at regular safety meetings are few and far between. Now it’s time to hone those goals and repeat the process with new and improved objectives. Until you’ve stopped ordering band aids, your job is never done.

    Learn more: ACCIDENTS – It Can’t Happen to Me

    OSHA Safety Training & DOT, Oil & Gas, Maritime, Forklift, Construction & HAZMAT From OSHA Safety Series Training and Federal Title 29 CFR to Forklift Safety, to Petrochemical and Maritime OSHA Compliance, we have Books, Manuals, CDs, DVDs, Videos, Training Materials, Safety Kits, Forms, Safety Posters & much more to make sure that your are compliant with not only the Department of Labor and Department of Transportation rules and regulations but also keeping you properly informed about how to properly protect your workforce on a day-to-day basis. Whether its a construction site, hauling hazardous waste or working as a longshoreman, there are specific federal rules and regulations that need to be followed and kept up-to-date with. We are here to make sure that you have available the most most up-to-date, thorough, yet easy to understand material and information on the ever-changing codes of the CFR. Books, DVDs, Update Services on DOT/49 CFR Standards, Petrochemical and Maritime Regulations, Cal/OSHA Safety Regulations, 1910 and 1926 Parts and much more! OSHA Safety Training & DOT, Oil & Gas, Maritime, Forklift, Construction & HAZMAT
    From OSHA Safety Series Training and Federal Title 29 CFR to Forklift Safety, to Petrochemical and Maritime OSHA Compliance, we have Books, Manuals, CDs, DVDs, Videos, Training Materials, Safety Kits, Forms, Safety Posters & much more to make sure that your are compliant with not only the Department of Labor and Department of Transportation rules and regulations but also keeping you properly informed about how to properly protect your workforce on a day-to-day basis. Whether its a construction site, hauling hazardous waste or working as a longshoreman, there are specific federal rules and regulations that need to be followed and kept up-to-date with. We are here to make sure that you have available the most most up-to-date, thorough, yet easy to understand material and information on the ever-changing codes of the CFR.
    Books, DVDs, Update Services on DOT/49 CFR Standards, Petrochemical and Maritime Regulations, Cal/OSHA Safety Regulations, 1910 and 1926 Parts and much more!
  • Hand & Portable Powered Tools

    Hazard Recognition

    Tools are such a common part of our lives that it is difficult to remember that they may pose hazards. All tools are manufactured with safety in mind but, tragically, a serious accident often occurs before steps are taken to search out and avoid or eliminate tool-related hazards.

    In the process of removing or avoiding the hazards, workers must learn to recognize the hazards associated with the different types of tools and the safety precautions necessary to prevent those hazards.

    Hand Tools

    Hand tools are non-powered. They include anything from axes to wrenches. The greatest hazards posed by hand tools result from misuse and improper maintenance.

    Some examples:

    • Using a screwdriver as a chisel may cause the tip of the screwdriver to break and fly, hitting the user or other employees.
    • If a wooden handle on a tool such as a hammer or an axe is loose, splintered, or cracked, the head of the tool may fly off and strike the user or another worker.
    • A wrench must not be used if its jaws are sprung, because it might slip.
    • Impact tools such as chisels, wedges, or drift pins are unsafe if they have mushroomed heads. The heads might shatter on impact, sending sharp fragments flying.

    hand-power-toolsThe employer is responsible for the safe condition of tools and equipment used by employees but the employees have the responsibility for properly using and maintaining tools.

    Employers should caution employees that saw blades, knives, or other tools be directed away from aisle areas and other employees working in close proximity. Knives and scissors must be sharp. Dull tools can be more hazardous than sharp ones.

    Appropriate personal protective equipment, e.g., safety goggles, gloves, etc., should be worn due to hazards that may be encountered while using portable power tools and hand tools.

    Safety requires that floors be kept as clean and dry as possible to prevent accidental slips with or around dangerous hand tools.

    Around flammable substances, sparks produced by iron and steel hand tools can be a dangerous ignition source. Where this hazard exists, spark-resistant tools made from brass, plastic, aluminum, or wood will provide for safety.

    Power Tool Precautions

    Power tools can be hazardous when improperly used. There are several types of power tools, based on the power source they use: electric, pneumatic, liquid fuel, hydraulic, and powder-actuated.

    Employees should be trained in the use of all tools - not just power tools. They should understand the potential hazards as well as the safety precautions to prevent those hazards from occurring.

    The following general precautions should be observed by power tool users:

    • Never carry a tool by the cord or hose.
    • Never yank the cord or the hose to disconnect it from the receptacle.
    • Keep cords and hoses away from heat, oil, and sharp edges.
    • Disconnect tools when not in use, before servicing, and when changing accessories such as blades, bits and cutters.
    • All observers should be kept at a safe distance away from the work area.
    • Secure work with clamps or a vise, freeing both hands to operate the tool.
    • Avoid accidental starting. The worker should not hold a finger on the switch button while carrying a plugged-in tool.
    • Tools should be maintained with care. They should be kept sharp and clean for the best performance. Follow instructions in the user's manual for lubricating and changing accessories.
    • Be sure to keep good footing and maintain good balance.
    • The proper apparel should be worn. Loose clothing, ties, or jewelry can become caught in moving parts.
    • All portable electric tools that are damaged shall be removed from use and tagged "Do Not Use."

    Guards

    Hazardous moving parts of a power tool need to be safeguarded. For example, belts, gears, shafts, pulleys, sprockets, spindles, drums, fly wheels, chains, or other reciprocating, rotating, or moving parts of equipment must be guarded if such parts are exposed to contact by employees.

    Guards, as necessary, should be provided to protect the operator and others from the following:

    • point of operation,
    • in-running nip points,
    • rotating parts, and
    • flying chips and sparks.

    Safety guards must never be removed when a tool is being used. For example, portable circular saws must be equipped with guards. An upper guard must cover the entire blade of the saw. A retractable lower guard must cover the teeth of the saw, except when it makes contact with the work material. The lower guard must automatically return to the covering position when the tool is withdrawn from the work.

    Safety Switches

    The following hand-held powered tools must be equipped with a momentary contact "on-off" control switch: drills, tappers, fastener drivers, horizontal, vertical and angle grinders with wheels larger than 2 inches in diameter, disc and belt sanders, reciprocating saws, saber saws, and other similar tools. These tools also may be equipped with a lock-on control provided that turnoff can be accomplished by a single motion of the same finger or fingers that turn it on.

    The following hand-held powered tools may be equipped with only a positive "on-off" control switch: platen sanders, disc sanders with discs 2 inches or less in diameter; grinders with wheels 2 inches or less in diameter; routers, planers, laminate trimmers, nibblers, shears, scroll saws and jigsaws with blade shanks ¼-inch wide or less.

    Other hand-held powered tools such as circular saws having a blade diameter greater than 2 inches, chain saws, and percussion tools without positive accessory holding means must be equipped with a constant pressure switch that will shut off the power when the pressure is released.

    Electric Tools

    Employees using electric tools must be aware of several dangers; the most serious is the possibility of electrocution.

    Among the chief hazards of electric-powered tools are burns and slight shocks which can lead to injuries or even heart failure. Under certain conditions, even a small amount of current can result in fibrillation of the heart and eventual death. A shock also can cause the user to fall off a ladder or other elevated work surface.

    To protect the user from shock, tools must either have a three-wire cord with ground and be grounded, be double insulated, or be powered by a low-voltage isolation transformer. Three-wire cords contain two current-carrying conductors and a grounding conductor. One end of the grounding conductor connects to the tool's metal housing. The other end is grounded through a prong on the plug. Anytime an adapter is used to accommodate a two-hole receptacle, the adapter wire must be attached to a known ground. The third prong should never be removed from the plug.

    Double insulation is more convenient. The user and the tools are protected in two ways: by normal insulation on the wires inside, and by a housing that cannot conduct electricity to the operator in the event of a malfunction.

    These general practices should be followed when using electric tools:

    • Electric tools should be operated within their design limitations.
    • Gloves and safety footwear are recommended during use of electric tools.
    • When not in use, tools should be stored in a dry place.
    • Electric tools should not be used in damp or wet locations.
    • Work areas should be well lighted.

    Powered Abrasive Wheel Tools

    Powered abrasive grinding, cutting, polishing, and wire buffing wheels create special safety problems because they may throw off flying fragments.

    Before an abrasive wheel is mounted, it should be inspected closely and sound- or ring-tested to be sure that it is free from cracks or defects. To test, wheels should be tapped gently with a light non-metallic instrument. If they sound cracked or dead, they could fly apart in operation and so must not be used. A sound and undamaged wheel will give a clear metallic tone or "ring."

    To prevent the wheel from cracking, the user should be sure it fits freely on the spindle. The spindle nut must be tightened enough to hold the wheel in place, without distorting the flange. Follow the manufacturer's recommendations. Care must be taken to assure that the spindle wheel will not exceed the abrasive wheel specifications.

    Due to the possibility of a wheel disintegrating (exploding) during start-up, the employee should never stand directly in front of the wheel as it accelerates to full operating speed.

    Portable grinding tools need to be equipped with safety guards to protect workers not only from the moving wheel surface, but also from flying fragments in case of breakage.

    In addition, when using a powered grinder:

    • Always use eye protection.
    • Turn off the power when not in use.
    • Never clamp a hand-held grinder in a vise.

    Pneumatic Tools

    Pneumatic tools are powered by compressed air and include chippers, drills, hammers, and sanders.

    There are several dangers encountered in the use of pneumatic tools. The main one is the danger of getting hit by one of the tool's attachments or by some kind of fastener the worker is using with the tool.

    Eye protection is required and face protection is recommended for employees working with pneumatic tools.

    Noise is another hazard. Working with noisy tools such as jackhammers requires proper, effective use of hearing protection.

    When using pneumatic tools, employees must check to see that they are fastened securely to the hose to prevent them from becoming disconnected. A short wire or positive locking device attaching the air hose to the tool will serve as an added safeguard.

    A safety clip or retainer must be installed to prevent attachments, such as chisels on a chipping hammer, from being unintentionally shot from the barrel.

    Screens must be set up to protect nearby workers from being struck by flying fragments around chippers, riveting guns, staplers, or air drills.

    Compressed air guns should never be pointed toward anyone. Users should never "dead-end" it against themselves or anyone else.

    Powder-Actuated Tools

    Powder-actuated tools operate like a loaded gun and should be treated with the same respect and precautions. In fact, they are so dangerous that they must be operated only by specially trained employees.

    Safety precautions to remember include the following:

    • These tools should not be used in an explosive or flammable atmosphere.
    • Before using the tool, the worker should inspect it to determine that it is clean, that all moving parts operate freely, and that the barrel is free from obstructions.
    • The tool should never be pointed at anybody.
    • The tool should not be loaded unless it is to be used immediately. A loaded tool should not be left unattended, especially where it would be available to unauthorized persons.
    • Hands should be kept clear of the barrel end. To prevent the tool from firing accidentally, two separate motions are required for firing: one to bring the tool into position, and another to pull the trigger. The tools must not be able to operate until they are pressed against the work surface with a force of at least 5 pounds greater than the total weight of the tool.

    If a powder-actuated tool misfires, the employee should wait at least 30 seconds, then try firing it again. If it still will not fire, the user should wait another 30 seconds so that the faulty cartridge is less likely to explode, than carefully remove the load. The bad cartridge should be put in water.

    Suitable eye and face protection are essential when using a powder-actuated tool.

    The muzzle end of the tool must have a protective shield or guard centered perpendicularly on the barrel to confine any flying fragments or particles that might otherwise create a hazard when the tool is fired. The tool must be designed so that it will not fire unless it has this kind of safety device.

    All powder-actuated tools must be designed for varying powder charges so that the user can select a powder level necessary to do the work without excessive force.

    If the tool develops a defect during use it should be tagged and taken out of service immediately until it is properly repaired.

    Fasteners

    When using powder-actuated tools to apply fasteners, there are some precautions to consider. Fasteners must not be fired into material that would let them pass through to the other side. The fastener must not be driven into materials like brick or concrete any closer than 3 inches to an edge or corner. In steel, the fastener must not come any closer than one-half inch from a corner or edge. Fasteners must not be driven into very hard or brittle materials which might chip or splatter, or make the fastener ricochet.

    An alignment guide must be used when shooting a fastener into an existing hole. A fastener must not be driven into a spalled area caused by an unsatisfactory fastening.

    Hydraulic Power Tools

    The fluid used in hydraulic power tools must be an approved fire-resistant fluid and must retain its operating characteristics at the most extreme temperatures to which it will be exposed.

    The manufacturer's recommended safe operating pressure for hoses, valves, pipes, filters, and other fittings must not be exceeded.

    Jacks

    All jacks - lever and rachet jacks, screw jacks, and hydraulic jacks - must have a device that stops them from jacking up too high. Also, the manufacturer's load limit must be permanently marked in a prominent place on the jack and should not be exceeded.

    A jack should never be used to support a lifted load. Once the load has been lifted, it must immediately be blocked up.

    Use wooden blocking under the base if necessary to make the jack level and secure. If the lift surface is metal, place a 1-inch-thick hardwood block or equivalent between it and the metal jack head to reduce the danger of slippage.

    To set up a jack, make certain of the following:

    • the base rests on a firm level surface,
    • the jack is correctly centered,
    • the jack head bears against a level surface, and
    • the lift force is applied evenly.

    Proper maintenance of jacks is essential for safety. All jacks must be inspected before each use and lubricated regularly. If a jack is subjected to an abnormal load or shock, it should be thoroughly examined to make sure it has not been damaged.

    Hydraulic jacks exposed to freezing temperatures must be filled with an adequate antifreeze liquid.

    General Safety Precautions

    Employees who use hand and power tools and who are exposed to the hazards of falling, flying, abrasive and splashing objects, or exposed to harmful dusts, fumes, mists, vapors, or gases must be provided with the particular personal equipment necessary to protect them from the hazard.

    All hazards involved in the use of power tools can be prevented by following five basic safety rules:

    • Keep all tools in good condition with regular maintenance.
    • Use the right tool for the job.
    • Examine each tool for damage before use.
    • Operate according to the manufacturer's instructions.
    • Provide and use the proper protective equipment.

    Employees and employers have a responsibility to work together to establish safe working procedures. If a hazardous situation is encountered, it should be brought to the attention of the proper individual immediately.

    hand-power-tool-safety-tileHand and Power Tool Safety - OSHA Safety Training: Hand and power tools are used every day in many types of business. They make our work easier and allow us to be more efficient. However, we often fail to see the hazards these tools present.

    Our training products on "Hand and Power Tool Safety" show how accidents can be significantly reduced by applying good general safety rules, and review what hazards are associated with the specific types of tools employees use. Topics covered in these products include:

    • Choosing tools that fit you and the job.
    • Protecting yourself and others from tool-related hazards.
    • Personal protective equipment.
    • The special hazards associated with electric power tools.
    • Tool care and maintenance.
    • and more.

    Get a Quote for a Class:
    Hand and Power Tool Safety Live Instruction Training Courses at YOUR Location

  • Leaving On A Trip? Use These Travel Tips!

    Taking that well deserved vacation can be a treat for you and the entire family. However, before you decide to book your vacation, read some helpful hints about traveling in this informative article. Use the tips and information provided to help you have a more pleasurable experience.

    Shop around for the best deal. Often, a shift in a day or two from your departure or return can amount to a significant savings of several hundred dollars in your transportation cost. Many websites can check this automatically for you. As a general rule, if you can avoid travelling on Fridays or Sundays, you will save a pile of money.

    If you pack electronics while traveling, either remove the batteries or flip them around. Some small electronics can be easily flipped on. You definitely do not want them flipping on in your bag during the trip. There is a good chance the battery might be drained by the time they are unpacked.

    Plan clothing for your trip so that everything can be worn together. This reduces the need to pack individual "outfits" and allows you to plan for the number of days you'll be traveling. If all of your clothes match, you don't have to worry about which are clean when you're doing laundry.

    If you are planning on flying or riding a long distance with school-age children, consider investing in a small portable DVD player. The least expensive ones can run as low as $75, and the peace of mind it buys you on that nine-hour international flight is more than worth the cost.

    It is important to do research before you pick your destination and it is incredibly important to shop around. By applying the advice in this article, you will not only pick the destinations most suited to you, but you will also posses the knowledge to make the most of your trip.

    Travel First Aid Kits

    Travel First Aid Kits - For adventure into the jungle or across town: Be ready with your traveling first aid pack! Travel First Aid Kits - For adventure into the jungle or across town: Be ready with your traveling first aid pack!

    Domestic & International Travel Safety Emergency Kits: Illness or injury can ruin a trip, so whenever you travel away from home, it is essential that you have a Travel first aid kit. Make sure you have all the resources you need to stay healthy -- or in the case of a bump or bruise, to make sure you can administer self-care and get back to exploring. Too many travelers assume the over-the-counter medications and first aid supplies we find in any drug store will be available on their journeys - this is often not the case, so bring a first aid kit specifically designed for traveling! To enable you to cope if a more significant health problem interrupts your travels, your first aid kit should also contain items to help you treat injuries and reduce symptoms of illness for a period of time until you can get further medical attention. Don't miss the Dental Medic Kit (a must for travelers) and the Suture Syringe kit. Also see Travel Kits for Pets!

    Travel First Aid Kits - For adventure into the jungle or across town: Be ready with your traveling first aid pack!

  • Construction, Carpentry, and Lumber Handling Safety

    There are many specific OSHA regulations surrounding Construction Safety,  and personnel performing duties in carpentry and lumber handling are potentially exposed to a wide variety of hazards in many different environments and locations.

    Potential hazards include exposures to flammable and combustible adhesives, dusts, hazardous noise, eye hazards, working at heights above ground level, lifting hazards, electric and pneumatic power tools, and working with unfinished material which could expose them to splinters.

    Many tasks are performed in areas of high pedestrian traffic; therefore, an additional hazard of possible distraction from the job task arises.Construction-First-Aid-2

    Work Procedures, Controls and PPE

    Personal Protective Equipment worn while operating machinery, equipment, and saws within the shop and on job sites normally consists of eye protection, safety-toe shoes, and hearing protection. Other safety related personal protective equipment are dust masks where workers are exposed to dust at the point of operation. The Safety and Health Manager shall be consulted to determine the need for dust masks.

    Hard hats are required on job sites where the potential exists from being struck by falling object(s), e.g., roofing and construction.

    Workers shall not leave a woodworking machine running unattended nor shall they attempt to clear, clean, or repair the machine while it is operating.

    When maintenance is necessary, the machine shall be completely shut down, its control switches locked and tagged in the “OFF” position.

    Chips or dust shall never be removed from machinery by hand.

    Machine guards shall not be removed or made inoperative except for authorized maintenance. When guards are removed during machine repair, power control switches shall be locked in the “OFF” position and properly tagged. The machine shall remain locked until the guards are replaced.

    Table Saw Operations

    Personnel using the company table saw shall follow proper safety procedures.  The following safety table saw operations shall be followed:

    • Contractors First Aid Kits Contractors First Aid Kits

      Keep hands out of the line of cut when feeding table saws. Use a push stick when close to the blade.

    • Adjust saw to expose the least amount of saw blade above table and material being cut.
    • Always stand out of line of stock being ripped.
    • Hold stock being cut against a gauge when cutting with a circular table saw.
    • Always use the appropriate saw for the cut (it would be unsafe to rip with a crosscut saw or to crosscut with a ripsaw).
    • Avoid crosscutting long boards on a table saw.
    • Never adjust the saw or fence gauge while the saw is operating.
    • Designate the line of cut on the table top with a permanent mark when setting the gauge of a table saw without removing the guards.
    • Always use a brush or stick to clean or scrape sawdust from a saw.

    Ventilation Systems

    Application-

    Machines that develop fine dust or other airborne contaminants shall be equipped with effective industrial exhaust ventilation. In shops where small numbers of installed machines are not continuously in operation, portable collection systems may be used.

    Exhaust Ducts and Pipes-

    These shall be constructed and sized to minimize clogging. They shall discharge into an enclosed container.

    Refuse-

    Refuse shall be removed daily in all operations that are not required to have an exhaust system or where the refuse cannot be handled by an exhaust system.

    Storage and Handling of Lumber

    Storage areas for lumber and other building materials can be potentially hazardous. For example, when lumber is stored upright, precautions shall be taken to prevent it from falling into aisles or passageways. Lumber stored in tiers shall be stacked, blocked, and interlocked and the stacks shall be limited in height so they are stable and secure against sliding or collapse. Furthermore, storage areas shall be kept free of accumulations of materials that constitute tripping, fire, or explosion hazards.

    When workers cannot safely handle heavy stock, suitable mechanical lifting devices shall be used.

    Gloves shall be worn by workers to reduce injury potential to the hands from splinters or from being pinched between the stacks. The accidental movement of the stacked material can cause serious injuries. Caution shall be taken not to disturb other tiers when removing partial stacks for use.

    Manual handling is relatively safe if the proper lifting and carrying positions are used. Balanced handling is the key to safe handling.

    Potential physical and health hazards can be effectively controlled by proper work procedures and controls, and by using required personal protective equipment.

    OSHA Standards

    Image of 1910 OSHA General Industry Regulations Book & CD-ROM

    OSHA General Industry & OSHA Construction Standards and Compliance

    Cal / OSHA Safety

    Image of Cal / OSHA General Industry Safety Orders Book & CD

    Cal / OSHA - General Industry & Construction Industry

    Construction Site First Aid Kits for Compliance & Safety

    We realized that there is a need for an economical, straightforward, basic, no frills contractor first aid kit. Contractor First Aid Kits were developed to address the growing and under-served first aid needs of the contractor market. We strongly feel that every contractor should own a first aid kit to be prepared for all injuries that could happen on a job site. OSHA also requires that adequate first aid supplies should be available for employees. Also, these Contractors and Construction Kits are unique in that they are Doctor recommended as OSHA, ANSI/ISEA and Cal/OSHA compliant - we searched high and low for a kit that a physician would recommend to comply with California's strict OSHA guidelines for Construction and found these for you. You can even request a letter from our MD recommending this kit with your order!

    Contractors' injuries are diverse, but their basic first aid needs are simple. Their jobs are strenuous, tiring, and the occurrence of minor injuries is extremely high. For minor injuries, an adequate first aid kit will allow the injured person or co-workers to administer first aid and get the employee back to work. For major injuries, the contents of a construction first aid kit can be used to provide care to the injured person, before an EMT or ambulance arrives. It could mean a matter of life and death. A construction site safety survey should always be conducted to ensure that the proper first aid supplies are available for the types of injuries that may occur at any jobsite. See our 10, 25 and 50 person OSHA & ANSI / ISEA Compliant Construction First Aid kits below... We've got your Construction First Aid Compliance needs covered! These kits are appropriate for Construction Work sites and Contractor use to comply with Federal OSHA regulation 1910.151(b), ANSI Z308.1-2009, ANSI Z308-1-2009 as well as Cal/OSHA 3400 section guidelines and Cal/OSHA Title 7, Subchapter 4. Construction Safety Orders §1512.

    Construction First Aid - Contractors First Aid Kits / Job Site First Aid Kit / Type III First Aid Kits

    Also See OSHA CONSTRUCTION BOOKS & GUIDES & Live Construction Safety Training including Forklift Safety Training &THESE KITS CAN BE CUSTOM LABELED!

  • ACCIDENTS - It Can't Happen to Me

    Accidents happen to other people. Car accidents happen to other people, work injuries happen to other people. Yes, accidents do happen to other people, but the lucky ones never experience an accident. Well, if that's a true statement, we'd all be wearing our lucky charms all the time. Luck has nothing to do with it, but accident prevention is each individual's responsibility.

    Why do people think that accidents only happen to someone else? One of the best reasons is a person may have worked safely for many years without an injury and truly believes that an accident will not happen. There are many other reasons or rationalization that can be used to explain how accidents happen to other people, but let's for get that for now.

    Accidents and injuries can be prevented, so let's begin that journey right now.

    If you look at the word accident itself, it's defined as an unplanned, uncontrollable event..... When you use the word uncontrollable, that means it can't be controlled.

    Experience has demonstrated that accidents can be controlled. Right away, that tells you the word accident should not be used in what we normally call an accident.

    It may be unplanned, but it can be controlled. For the time being, everyone is familiar with the word accident, so we'll continue to use it, just keep in mind that accidents can be controlled.

    What causes accidents? There may be several causes contributing to an accident... lack of knowledge, taking short cuts, not paying attention to the job, violating safety rules and others, caused by the behavior of the individual. There may be causes related to unsafe conditions or safety hazards that contribute to the accident. A combination of unsafe behavior and unsafe conditions can cause accidents. Accident investigation is conducted to determine the cause of all accidents so corrective action can be taken to prevent a similar occurrence in the future; not to find fault or blame, but the cause of the accident.

    When you determine what caused an accident, you can do something about it so it won't
    happen again. That's basic safety information, but it's something you should keep in mind to help maintain a good attitude about accident prevention.

    Are accidents ever caused by something beyond an individual's control? Quite obviously, since the action or failure of action by another individual can lead to an accident of someone not involved. It happens everyday. There have been thousands and thousands of fatalities of employees who weren't doing anything unsafe, but got caught in the process of some other accident cause.

    How about those deaths resulting from cave-ins? Its’ straight fact that no employee would ever go into a trench, if they knew it was going to cave in. No one would ever stay at hotel, if they knew that particular hotel was going to catch on fire during their stay.

    There's always a sense of security about the job you're performing, and you fully believe that nothing will go wrong. It's when you let your guard down, by believing in this false sense of security that accidents occur.
    We could go on and on, but the point we want to make is..... accidents and injuries can be prevented. Nothing mysterious about the process, no magic....... but each individual must
    take the responsibility to avoid accident causes.

    How about those back injuries? Can they be prevented? After all, the back is a weak link in our anatomical being, so how can back injuries be prevented? By keeping your back healthy through exercise and using your knowledge to lift safely, every time you lift anything. It's not good enough to know how to lift safely. You have to practice it every time you lift anything. You need the knowledge of how your back works, so you can make the right decision how to lift safely even when you can't bend your legs. It's thinking about your back and not taking chances....every day, on every job.

    There are thousands of safety rules, regulations and certainly your organization's policies and procedures relating to safety. It's up to each individual to be aware of safety, exercise good judgment and to perform every job in a safe and healthy manner. No more, no less. You've heard it from the people who have witnessed or experienced accidents and injuries. You've probably witnessed or experienced accidents yourselves, but the moral of the story is that accidents don't just happen to other people. They are caused by something or someone. If you eliminate the cause of accidents, you're on your way to an accident free workplace and lifetime.

    Safety works in your home also. It works when you're driving your automobile. It works when you decide to make it work. Right now, commit to taking safety seriously and you'll find that accident prevention is a piece of cake.

    OSHA Safety Training & DOT, Oil & Gas, Maritime, Forklift, Construction & HAZMAT From OSHA Safety Series Training and Federal Title 29 CFR to Forklift Safety, to Petrochemical and Maritime OSHA Compliance, we have Books, Manuals, CDs, DVDs, Videos, Training Materials, Safety Kits, Forms, Safety Posters & much more to make sure that your are compliant with not only the Department of Labor and Department of Transportation rules and regulations but also keeping you properly informed about how to properly protect your workforce on a day-to-day basis. Whether its a construction site, hauling hazardous waste or working as a longshoreman, there are specific federal rules and regulations that need to be followed and kept up-to-date with. We are here to make sure that you have available the most most up-to-date, thorough, yet easy to understand material and information on the ever-changing codes of the CFR. Books, DVDs, Update Services on DOT/49 CFR Standards, Petrochemical and Maritime Regulations, Cal/OSHA Safety Regulations, 1910 and 1926 Parts and much more! OSHA Safety Training & DOT, Oil & Gas, Maritime, Forklift, Construction & HAZMAT
    From OSHA Safety Series Training and Federal Title 29 CFR to Forklift Safety, to Petrochemical and Maritime OSHA Compliance, we have Books, Manuals, CDs, DVDs, Videos, Training Materials, Safety Kits, Forms, Safety Posters & much more to make sure that your are compliant with not only the Department of Labor and Department of Transportation rules and regulations but also keeping you properly informed about how to properly protect your workforce on a day-to-day basis. Whether its a construction site, hauling hazardous waste or working as a longshoreman, there are specific federal rules and regulations that need to be followed and kept up-to-date with. We are here to make sure that you have available the most most up-to-date, thorough, yet easy to understand material and information on the ever-changing codes of the CFR.
    Books, DVDs, Update Services on DOT/49 CFR Standards, Petrochemical and Maritime Regulations, Cal/OSHA Safety Regulations, 1910 and 1926 Parts and much more!
  • How to Manage OSHA Inspections and Investigations

    Perhaps of all of the interactions that occur with regulatory agencies, the unannounced OSHA inspection is the most stressful, and least understood by business owners. The key to managing a surprise OSHA Inspection or a letter of complaint directed at your company is to understand what the process is and what the OSHA inspectors are looking for.

    Some "Easy Steps to Avoid OSHA Issues" include:

    • Make sure to OSHA Records are always up to date
    • Have OSHA Compliant First Aid kits and Cabinets stocked and ready
    • Keep staff current on Safety Training

    Accident-Investigation


    Accident Investigation - OSHA Safety Training: "Accidents will happen". We have all heard that statement before. Unfortunately, sometimes it is true. In spite of our best efforts, things occasionally do go wrong. While many accidents seem to happen for obvious reasons, there may be things that contribute to an accident which are not always apparent. That is why it is vital to conduct a thorough Accident Investigation.

    Our training products on "Accident Investigation" show employees steps that are taken in an accident investigation, and highlight how important it is for employees to fully cooperate with any inquiry. They also point out that while an investigation's focus is to determine the cause of an accident, the overall goal is to prevent similar accidents from happening again. The topics covered in the products include:

    • ~ The goals of an accident investigation.
    • ~ Securing an accident scene.
    • ~ "Root-cause" analysis.
    • ~ The importance of investigative interviews.
    • ~ Assisting in an accident investigation.
    • ~ Reporting the "near misses".
    • ~ The role of policies, equipment and training on accident prevention.
    • ,,,and more.

    Get a Quote for a Class:
    Accident Investigation Live Instruction Training Courses at YOUR Location


     

    Consider the "triggers" and events that occur during an inspection by OSHA. Learn ways to mitigate the results of an inspection, and the consequences of an inspection. Fines and possible penalties are also discussed.

    Know the reasons for an OSHA inspection and ways to attempt to prevent an inspection from occurring. However, should an inspection occur, manage an inspection to reduce the negative results that may occur, as well reducing penalties and fines. Know the current fees associated with the various types of findings in an OSHA inspection.

    What is the process is for an OSHA inspection? How should you respond to a letter of complaint?  Research the helpful resources at OSHA provided so that business owners and safety personnel have a better understanding and feel more in control of the situation when OSHA inspectors arrive at on-site, especially if they arrive unannounced.

    Points to consider:

    • Steps to take to avoid an OSHA Inspection
    • Understand the reasons for an OSHA Inspection
    • Understand what the inspector will do during the inspection
    • Help you understand how employees and unions fit into the inspection
    • Learn what to expect during an OSHA visit
    • Decide how to conduct yourself during a surprise inspection
    • Steps to take to avoid as many problems as possible during the inspection
    • Steps to take immediately following the inspection

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