ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard Minimum Requirements  Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies - Buy new ANSI Kits
ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard Minimum Requirements Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies - Buy new ANSI Kits

tourniquet

  • Latex Free Medical Tourniquets

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    Medical Tourniquets


    • Latex Free - Safeguard against latex allergies or sensitivity
    • Comes in rolls of 1” wide X 18” long for optimal elasticity
    • Patient appreciates the smooth comfort and ease when applied
    • Strong and superior elastic construction
    • Tear resistant for maximum performance

    Buy our 1"x18" Latex Free Tourniquet Here
  • How to apply a tourniquet

    With the accessibility of tourniquets now (heavily recommended by the Hartford Consensus, the Stop the Bleed program and now also required in ANSI Class B First Aid kits for workplaces) we thought we would share some information on tourniquet use.

     Hemostatic Band / Tourniquet Strap - 1 Each Product Description Genuine First Aid GFAP-62-01 Hemostatic Band / Tourniquet Strap - 1 Each Genuine First Aid Hemostatic Band / Tourniquet Strap is designed with an elastic strap and easy release button. The strap itself is 1" x 12" and it also has the two buckle pieces on the ends. Clever and easy-to-use tourniquet! Bandages and packaging are certified latex free. This item has CE & FDA approval Meets strict conformity with international standards - ISO9001, ISO13485
    Hemostatic Band / Tourniquet Strap - 1 Each
    Product Description Genuine First Aid GFAP-62-01 Hemostatic Band / Tourniquet Strap - 1 Each
    Genuine First Aid Hemostatic Band / Tourniquet Strap is designed with an elastic strap and easy release button. The strap itself is 1" x 12" and it also has the two buckle pieces on the ends. Clever and easy-to-use tourniquet!
    Bandages and packaging are certified latex free.
    This item has CE & FDA approval
    Meets strict conformity with international standards - ISO9001, ISO13485

    After years of first aid courses for bystanders recommending against tourniquet use (for fear of causing more damage than good) it has become evident that bystanders need to have tourniquets available and know how to use them, A person can dies from exsanguination (bleeding out) in 3-5 minutes... faster than from cardiac arrest, and much faster than the national average emergency response time of 8-14 minutes - bystanders are the key to saving lives from bleeding injury.

    CBS 10 News gives these directions:
    Using a tourniquet is something you want to use only for an extreme injury according to Tampa paramedic Capt. Stephen White.

    "An auto accident where someone has a severed limb, shark bites, when someone cuts themself severely," he says.

    Regardless, it's a technique that many physicians and paramedics say you should know in case you ever have to use it, just like CPR.

    While professional tourniquets can be purchased, White says most people will not have one will have to improvise with what they have on scene. Consumers will want to find something clean, in addition to long and at least an inch wide. He suggests ripping a sheet, shirt or towel, or using a belt or even a dog leash.

    White says to start tying it about 5 inches away from the wound. Once it is secured in place, find something sturdy like a stick or screwdriver. Then, tie the fabric around that.

    "Then you begin to twist it and as you twist it, it's going to get tighter and tighter until the blood stops flowing," says White.

    Once the bleeding stops he says, "You want to write a big T on their forehead for 'tourniquet' and the time you got there, so when they finally get to the hospital they'll know how long the tourniquet has been in place."

    It's a simple first-aid approach that can be the difference between life and death, but he reminds people that it is to be used only in an extreme situation or when elevating the wound above the heart or putting pressure on the wound won't stop the bleeding.tourniquet-application

  • Bleeding and Soft Tissue Injury Treatment

    Image of cut on back of legSevere bleeding is a Medical Emergency. Controlling severe bleeding is an important part of first aid.

    Treatment

    • Call 9-1-1 or EMS if bleeding is severe and difficult to stop.
    • Have the casualty lie down, if possible.
    • Place a clean, sterile, cloth directly over the bleeding site. If available, the rescuer should wear gloves to protect from Bloodborne Pathogens.
    • Firmly apply pressure to the wound using one or both hands.
    • Apply a bandage to hold the first dressing in place. Apply additional cloths or pads if bleeding continues. Do not remove the initial dressing as this will tear away the clotted blood and cause bleeding to start over.
    • Elevate the bleeding site above the heart level if bleeding is difficult to control with firm, direct pressure. Do not elevate the limb if you suspect the possibility of broken bones or head, neck, or spinal injury.
    • Continue to apply direct, firm pressure to control bleeding until Emergency Medical Personnel arrive.
    • A tourniquet should be used only as a last resort and is not recommended unless the responder has specific training on how to use a tourniquet safety.
    • Do not give the casualty alcohol, caffeinated beverages, or aspirin.
    • Once the bleeding has been controlled:
      1. Continue to apply firm pressure to the injury site.
      2. Keep the casualty warm by covering him/her with coats or blankets.
      3. Do not move the casualty unless necessary.
      4. If the casualty is conscious and asks for water, moisten her/his lips with a small amount of water. Do not give water to an unconscious casualty or if abdominal injury is suspected.

    Also read: Treatment for Cuts and Abrasions & Shock First Aid Treatment

    Content excerpted from the Urgent First Aid Guide used by permission Copyright 2013 UrgentFirstAid.com
    All Rights Reserved. Get a full copy of the First Aid Guide for under $1!

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