ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard Minimum Requirements  Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies - Buy new ANSI Kits
ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard Minimum Requirements Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies - Buy new ANSI Kits

unconscious casualty

  • Steps for Using an AED if an Unconscious Casualty is Found In Water

    Image of first responsder rescuing an unconscious casualty in the waterIf an unconscious casualty is found in water, remove the casualty from the water and away from any water deep enough to splash. Follow the steps below for AED use.

    1. Power on the AED.
    2. Attach the electrode pads on casualty according to the instructions included. These directions are generally to place first pad on upper right side of chest, just below the collarbone and the second pad on the lower left side of the chest, just below and to the left of the nipple.
    3. Allow the AED to analyze the casualty’s heart rhythm. Stop CPR and do not touch or move the casualty during this phase. No one should touch or have contact with the casualty for the next few steps.
    4. If defibrillation is required, the AED will prompt the responder to administer a shock or will automatically shock. Remember, do not touch the casualty while the AED is analyzing or shocking.
    5. Step back and announce, “Stand Clear!” to avoid inadvertently disturbing the analysis of the heart rhythm or risk shocking a responder or bystander. Scan the area to be sure everyone is clear of the casualty. Assistant responders should be trained to respond clearly and loudly that they are “Clear!”
    6. If directed to do so, push the appropriate button to administer a shock to the casualty.
    7. Repeat shocks if prompted to do so. The AED is designed to administer shocks only when it is appropriate for the casualty’s condition. A responder cannot accidentally administer an unneeded shock, even if the shock button is pressed repeatedly.
    8. Recheck for responsiveness. Resume
    CPR for 2 minutes. Allow the AED to analyze the heart rhythm every two minutes or until Emergency Medical Services arrive and take over care of the casualty.

    Content excerpted from the Urgent First Aid Guide used by permission Copyright 2013 UrgentFirstAid.com All Rights Reserved. Get a full copy of the First Aid Guide for under $1!

    Automated External Defibrillation (AED) use is something everyone should know, but is not something you can learn by reading a great article like this, nor with online training. Current research indicates that the chance of surviving Sudden Cardiac Arrest is improved by up to 70% if an AED is used within the first few minutes. Find out what to do with so little time, by signing up for AED Training at your location... check out American CPR Training™

  • Signs and Symptoms of Poisoning

    Image of AAPCC Poison Help logoFor more information about poisoning, visit the American Association of Poison Control Centers at www.aapcc.org or call Poison Help 1-800-222-1222. Keep this number handy and visible near all telephones in the home, work place, and childcare agencies.

    Signs and symptoms of poisoning include:

    • Sudden seizures, unconsciousness, confusion, nausea, vomiting, or illness when access to poisons is possible.
    • Opened bottles or packages of drugs or poisonous chemicals found near an ill or unconscious casualty.
    • Berries, leaves, plants, or other poisonous substances in the mouth. (Other swallowed poisons may include; wild mushrooms, household or lawn & garden chemicals, hair dye or cosmetic products, and over-the-counter and/or prescription medications.)
    • Pain or burning sensation in the throat.
    • Burns or discoloration around the mouth area.
    • Unusual odor on the breath.
    • Odors of a petroleum product, in the area and on the breath – such as; kerosene, gasoline, lighter fluid, and furniture polish. (Other poisons include: Acids such as; rust removers, toilet bowl cleaners. Alkalis such as; lye, bleach, and ammonia.)

    ALSO READ:

    Content excerpted from the Urgent First Aid Guide used by permission Copyright 2013 UrgentFirstAid.com
    All Rights Reserved. Get a full copy of the First Aid Guide for under $1!

    Poisoning can occur in a variety of ways; from ingestion, inhalation, absorption or injection! Learn first aid treatment for the different types of poisoning (it is very different and specific to each situation). Find out about LIVE OSHA Standard First Aid & Emergency Care at your location... check out American CPR Training™

  • Shock First Aid Treatment

    Image of responder assisting an anaphylactic shock victim

    • Call 9-1-1 or EMS immediately.
    • One of the most important treatments for shock is keeping the casualty as calm and comfortable as possible.
    • Control the cause of the shock; such as controlling severe bleeding, if possible.
    • If a spinal, neck, or head trauma is not suspected, keep the airway open with the head tilt-chin lift method.
    • If the casualty vomits, turn her/his head to one side to avoid aspirating on or swallowing the vomit. If a spine, neck, or head injury is suspected, keep the casualty’s head, neck, and body in a straight line while turning him/her on her/his side.
    • If possible, elevate the casualty’s legs above the level of the heart. Do not elevate if you suspect broken bones in the legs, neck, or spine.
    • Keep the casualty as comfortable and warm as possible. Cover any visible injuries with a clean, sterile dressing.
    • Do not give fluids to an unconscious casualty. If medical assistance is delayed for more than an hour, you may give the casualty small sips of water.
    • Do not give any fluids if you suspect an abdominal or other injury that may require immediate surgery.
    • Do not give alcoholic, caffeinated or sugary beverages.

    Learn what Shock is.

    Content excerpted from the Urgent First Aid Guide used by permission Copyright 2013 UrgentFirstAid.com
    All Rights Reserved. Get a full copy of the First Aid Guide for under $1!

    Shock can be a life-threatening condition and can manifest itself in a variety of ways and levels of severity. Learn The Signs & Symptoms for shock, as well as treatment for specific types of shock. Find out about LIVE OSHA Standard First Aid & Emergency Care at your location... check out American CPR Training™

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