ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard Minimum Requirements  Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies - Buy new ANSI Kits
ANSI Z308.1-2015 Standard Minimum Requirements Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies - Buy new ANSI Kits

weather

  • Hurricane & Other Preparedness

    Are You Ready?!

    It is easy to say "I am going to prepare". We all plan to be prepared. Disasters have a way of happening before we are actually prepared. Here are some free and inexpensive ways to jump start your preparedness today.

    Fast & Easy Ways to Prepare.

    Get started now! Share these great infographics with everyone you know. If you are generous, stock up on some inexpensive ponchos and emergency blankets to share with everyone in your workplace, family, or group. From under a buck!

    See our recommended Survival & Emergency Gear Products below, or visit our Disaster Survival page.

    Learn More... FREE!

  • Hurricane Alley Emergency Alert

    The latest expert predictions have been updated...

    ...and now call for up to 9 Hurricanes to hit the USA this 2019 Hurricane season!

    According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Climate Prediction Center the likelihood of an above-normal Atlantic hurricane season has increased... and we are at the very beginning of this upcoming hurricane season. ARE YOU READY? You should have ample supplies at home and in your vehicles, at work, school, etc. Build your own kits or buy appropriate survival kits before the rush.

    August 8, 2019 NOAA forecasters monitoring oceanic and atmospheric patterns say conditions are now more favorable for above-normal hurricane activity since El Nino has now ended. Two named storms have formed so far this year and the peak months of the hurricane season, August through October, are now underway.

    Learn more with these helpful articles:

    Start now with these easy items to have on hand:

    Ready to go Kits & Supplies:

  • WRN severe weather and flooding

    WRN Ambassadors-

    As severe weather and flooding continue to impact much of the central U.S., we encourage all ambassadors to proactively engage your employees, stakeholders, and social network on how to be "Weather-Ready" for near-term threats and those on the horizon.

    (1) National Hurricane Preparedness Week (May 5-11, 2019)

    As part of National Hurricane Preparedness Week, the hurricane hunter aircraft are visiting five communities along the east coast. Learn more here!

    Did you know?

    • Over half of the water-related fatalities during the 2016-18 hurricane seasons were vehicle-related.
    • All five storm surge fatalities in Hurricane Michael last year were over the age of 60 years. Have a plan to assist the elderly and others most vulnerable.
    • Dangers exist even as the storm passes and skies clear - downed power lines, carbon monoxide from generators, and health complications from the cleanup.
    • Category 1 hurricanes since 2010 have caused 175 direct deaths and over $100 billion in damage in the U.S. Significant impacts aren't just caused by major hurricanes.

    (2) Flooding Threat Continues across Central U.S.

    • As the saying goes, "if it can rain, it can flood." Help your community as a WRN Ambassador prepare, respond, and recover from flooding events by taking advantage of our flood safety content and staying aware of the latest conditions on weather.gov and information from our Weather Enterprise partners.
    • Follow local weather forecast offices on social media. Learn how here.

    (3) Discover Other Awareness Weeks in Your Area

    • Some states have hurricane awareness weeks planned for June and July
    • Guam/Northern Marianas have "Typhoon Awareness Week" May 13-17
    • Other hazards, such as lightning, wildfires, rip currents, safe boating, and cold water (i.e., hypothermia due to river, lake, or ocean cold water) have state awareness weeks as well. Find safety content for all of these hazards here.

    (4) WRN Aviation Ambassador Webpage 

    Does your organization have aviation interests? Learn more about aviation weather services and opportunities to collaborate.

    (5) Other WRN opportunities...

    National Safe Boating Week (May 18-24)
    Summer Safety Campaign (June 1)

  • Leaves Turning, Throats Burning + Don't forget Nose & Toes

    Here we are in Autumn and heading toward Winter!

    Colder weather brings needs that are far different from warmer times… from avoiding the “kennel cough” rampaging around work or school, to treating the sniffles – even special concerns with driving on cold, wet roads or staying cozy at Fall outdoor events. Remember, too, that Autumn weather brings dry lips and itchy eyes, and holidays bring burns from cooking, campfires, and indoor warming devices. We would like to share our Team’s top recommendations for a healthy and safe season:

    Cold, Cough, Allergy
    & Sinus Relief

    Hand Sanitizer
    Gels & Towelettes

    Disinfectants
    & Deodorizers

    Eye Drops

    Lip Ointment / Lip Balm

    Automobile & Roadside Emergency

    Emergency Heat & Warmth

    Burn Relief Gels & Creams

  • Prepare for Floods Now

    Floods are the Most Common Natural Disaster in the United States

    Failing to evacuate flooded areas, entering flood waters, or remaining after a flood has passed can result in injury or death. Flooding is a temporary overflow of water onto land that is normally dry.

    • Floods may result from rain, snow, coastal storms, storm surges, and overflows of dams and other water systems.
    • Floods may develop slowly or quickly – Flash floods can come with no warning.
    • Floods may cause outages, disrupt transportation, damage buildings, and create landslides.

    IF YOU ARE UNDER A FLOOD WARNING, FIND SAFE SHELTER RIGHT AWAY

    • Do not walk, swim, or drive through flood waters. Turn Around, Don’t Drown!
    • Just six inches of moving water can knock you down, and one foot of moving water can sweep your vehicle away.
    • Stay off of bridges over fast-moving water.
    • Determine how best to protect yourself based on the type of flooding.
    • Evacuate if told to do so.
    • Move to higher ground or a higher floor.
    • Stay where you are.

    How to Stay Safe When a Flood Threatens

    Prepare NOW

    • Know types of flood risk in your area. Visit FEMA’s Flood Map Service Center for information.
    • Sign up for your community’s warning system. The Emergency Alert System (EAS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio also provide emergency alerts.
    • If flash flooding is a risk in your location, then monitor potential signs, such as heavy rain.
    • Learn and practice evacuation routes, shelter plans, and flash flood response.
    • Gather supplies in case you have to leave immediately, or if services are cut off. Keep in mind each person’s specific needs, including medication. Don’t forget the needs of pets. Obtain extra batteries and charging devices for phones and other critical equipment.
    • Purchase or renew a flood insurance policy. It typically takes up to 30 days for a policy to go into effect and can protect the life you've built. Homeowner’s policies do not cover flooding. Get flood coverage under the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP)
    • Keep important documents in a waterproof container. Create password-protected digital copies.
    • Protect your property. Move valuables to higher levels. Declutter drains and gutters. Install check valves. Consider a sump pump with a battery.

    Survive DURING a Flood

    • Depending on where you are, and the impact and the warning time of flooding, go to the safe location that you previously identified.
    • If told to evacuate, do so immediately. Never drive around barricades. Local responders use them to safely direct traffic out of flooded areas.
    • Listen to EAS, NOAA Weather Radio, or local alerting systems for current emergency information and instructions.
    • Do not walk, swim, or drive through flood waters. Turn Around. Don’t Drown!
    • Stay off bridges over fast-moving water. Fast-moving water can wash bridges away without warning.
    • If your vehicle is trapped in rapidly moving water, then stay inside. If water is rising inside the vehicle, then seek refuge on the roof.
    • If trapped in a building, then go to its highest level. Do not climb into a closed attic. You may become trapped by rising floodwater. Go on the roof only if necessary. Once there, signal for help.

    Be Safe AFTER a Flood

    • Listen to authorities for information and instructions. Return home only when authorities say it is safe.
    • Avoid driving, except in emergencies.
    • Snakes and other animals may be in your house. Wear heavy gloves and boots during clean up.
    • Be aware of the risk of electrocution. Do not touch electrical equipment if it is wet or if you are standing in water. If it is safe to do so, turn off the electricity to prevent electric shock.
    • Avoid wading in floodwater, which can contain dangerous debris and be contaminated. Underground or downed power lines can also electrically charge the water.
    • Use a generator or other gasoline-powered machinery ONLY outdoors and away from windows.

    READ MORE
    Keep Your Valuables Safe from Floods and Fires
    Hurricanes mean Flooding
    Prepare for More Hurricanes Now

  • Prepare for More Hurricanes Now

    The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 to November 30. The Pacific hurricane season runs May 15 to November 30.

    Hurricanes are massive storm systems that form over warm ocean waters and move toward land. Potential threats from hurricanes include powerful winds, heavy rainfall, storm surges, coastal and inland flooding, rip currents, tornadoes, and landslides.
    • Hurricanes can happen along any U.S. coast or in any territory in the Atlantic or Pacific oceans.
    • Hurricanes can affect areas more than 100 miles inland.
    • Hurricanes are most active in September.

    If you are Under a Hurricane Warning, Find Safet Shelter Right Away

    • Determine how best to protect yourself from high winds and flooding.
    • Evacuate if told to do so.
    • Take refuge in a designated storm shelter, or an interior room for high winds.
    • Listen for emergency information and alerts.
    • Only use generators outdoors and away from windows.
    • Turn Around, Don’t Drown! Do not walk, swim, or drive through flood waters.

    Prepare for Hurricanes NOW

    • Know your area’s risk of hurricanes.
    • Sign up for your community’s warning system. The Emergency Alert System (EAS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio also provide emergency alerts.
    • If you are at risk for flash flooding, watch for warning signs such as heavy rain.
    • Practice going to a safe shelter for high winds, such as a FEMA safe room or ICC 500 storm shelter. The next best protection is a small, interior, windowless room in a sturdy building on the lowest level that is not subject to flooding.
    • Based on your location and community plans, make your own plans for evacuation or sheltering in place.
    • Become familiar with your evacuation zone, the evacuation route, and shelter locations.
    • Gather needed supplies for at least three days. Keep in mind each person’s specific needs, including medication. Don’t forget the needs of pets.
    • Keep important documents in a safe place or create password-protected digital copies.
    • Protect your property. Declutter drains and gutters. Install check valves in plumbing to prevent backups. Consider hurricane shutters. Review insurance policies.

    When a hurricane is 18-36 hours from arriving

    • Bookmark your city or county website for quick access to storm updates and emergency instructions.
    • Bring loose, lightweight objects inside that could become projectiles in high winds (e.g., patio furniture, garbage cans); anchor objects that would be unsafe to bring inside (e.g., propane tanks); and trim or remove trees close enough to fall on the building.
    • Cover all of your home’s windows. Permanent storm shutters offer the best protection for windows. A second option is to board up windows with 5/8” exterior grade or marine plywood, cut to fit and ready to install.

    When a hurricane is 6 hours from arriving

    • If you’re not in an area that is recommended for evacuation, plan to stay at home or where you are and let friends and family know where you are.
    • Close storm shutters, and stay away from windows. Flying glass from broken windows could injure you.
    • Turn your refrigerator or freezer to the coldest setting and open only when necessary. If you lose power, food will last longer. Keep a thermometer in the refrigerator to be able to check the food temperature when the power is restored.
    • Turn on your TV/radio, or check your city/county website every 30 minutes in order to get the latest weather updates and emergency instructions.

    Survive DURING a Hurricane

    • If told to evacuate, do so immediately. Do not drive around barricades.
    • If sheltering during high winds, go to a FEMA safe room, ICC 500 storm shelter, or a small, interior, windowless room or hallway on the lowest floor that is not subject to flooding.
    • If trapped in a building by flooding, go to the highest level of the building. Do not climb into a closed attic. You may become trapped by rising flood water.
    • Listen for current emergency information and instructions.
    • Use a generator or other gasoline-powered machinery outdoors ONLY and away from windows.
    • Do not walk, swim, or drive through flood waters. Turn Around. Don’t Drown! Just six inches of fast-moving water can knock you down, and one foot of moving water can sweep your vehicle away.
    • Stay off of bridges over fast-moving water.

    Be Safe AFTER a Hurricane

    • Listen to authorities for information and special instructions.
    • Be careful during clean-up. Wear protective clothing and work with someone else.
    • Do not touch electrical equipment if it is wet or if you are standing in water. If it is safe to do so, turn off electricity at the main breaker or fuse box to prevent electric shock.
    • Avoid wading in flood water, which can contain dangerous debris. Underground or downed power lines can also electrically charge the water.
    • Save phone calls for emergencies. Phone systems are often down or busy after a disaster. Use text messages or social media to communicate with family and friends.
    • Document any property damage with photographs. Contact your insurance company for assistance.

    READ MORE
    Hurricane & Other Preparedness
    FEMA Prepares for Hurricanes and so are we!
    It’s Time to Prepare for Hurricane Season

  • Stay Alert: Nationwide Emergency Test on October 3


    Be Aware of the Nationwide Emergency Test

    UPDATE: Due to the response of Hurricane Florence, the nationwide test of the Emergency Alert System (EAS) and Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) has been postponed until October 3rd.

    On Wednesday, October 3, 2018, the Federal Emergency and Management Agency (FEMA) and the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) will conduct a nationwide test of the Emergency Alert System (EAS) and Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) beginning at 2:18 p.m. ET. The test will assess how ready the distribution channels are in case a national message needs sending and determine whether improvements are needed.

    READ MORE

  • Fall Weather Safety and Infographic

    Improve Communication of Hurricane Hazards!

    Be aware of specific hazards during September, October, and November. Serve as a force multiplier by engaging your employees, customers, and social media network with this article and infographic! Please also keep updated with the latest information from the National Hurricane Center at www.hurricanes.gov and your local Weather Forecast Office at www.weather.gov. Included here to the right is an infographic on "Delivering the Right Message." Click Here or on the image to view the infographic.

    Know Your Risk Take Action Be a Force of Nature

    Autumn safety should not be underestimated! Droughts, floods, fog, hurricanes, tsunamis, wind, wildfires, and early winter weather are all risky weather situations which you should be prepared and informed about. Learn what to do when water is scarce, what to do before / during / after a flood, how to drive safely in fog, preparing your family for a hurricane, prepare for hurricane evacuation, prepare for tsunamis, understand natural tsunami warnings, learn about wind warnings / watches / advisories, and how to evacuation from & prevent wildfires. Click here or the image below to see the weather.gov Fall Weather Safety PDF.

    URGENT REMINDER! Wireless Emergency Alert (WEA) National Test September 20

    IPAWS National Test of the Emergency Alert System (EAS) and Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA)
    Thursday, September 20, 2018

    The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), in coordination with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), will conduct a nationwide test of the Emergency Alert System (EAS) and Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) on September 20, 2018. The WEA portion of the test commences at 2:18 p.m. EDT, and the EAS portion follows at 2:20 p.m. EDT. The test will assess the operational readiness of the infrastructure for distribution of a national message and determine whether improvements are needed.

    The WEA test message will be sent to cell phones that are connected to wireless carriers participating in WEA. This is the fourth EAS nationwide test and the first national WEA test. Previous EAS national tests were conducted in September 2011, 2016 and 2017 in collaboration with the FCC, broadcasters, and emergency management officials in recognition of FEMA’s National Preparedness Month.

    To learn more go to:

    https://www.fema.gov/emergency-alert-test

  • Spring Storms are coming!

    Some like it hot, some like it wet, but nobody likes it when they lose control.

    That is exactly what can happen if you aren't prepared for Spring Weather. Spring brings all sorts of surprises, not just "Spring Showers", but Severe Weather including Tornadoes, Floods, Lightning, Heat, Tsunamis, Rip Currents and other Beach Hazards. Heck, why not throw in wind and wildfires, too? They are certainly known Spring dangers...

    So what to do?

    WRN-AmbassadorAs Weather Ready Nation Ambassadors, we will explore each of these issues in depth over the next weeks. In the interim, if you are a business, consider the Mitigation-Preparedness-Response-Recovery cycle. If you are an individual, take a Leap into Preparedness and start learning some survival basics and stocking up on emergency supplies. In either case, remember these Survival Tips:

    Disaster-Survival-GearSurvival Tips

    • Tip #1: Prepare your car before you prepare your home. Learn Why...
    • Tip #2: Eat food in your freezer after the food in your refrigerator. Learn Why...
    • Tip #3: Do not flush your toilets (Yet). Learn Why...
    • Tip #4: Change your flashlight and emergency radio batteries every time you adjust your clocks (daylight savings and standard time). Learn Why...
  • Spring Sprang

    While the first calendar day of Spring ( the Spring Equinox) is not until March 20th, True (Meteorological) Spring already began on March 1st.

    Spring-StormAs Weather Ready Nation Ambassadors, we remind you that Spring is a time of transition, when late-season snowstorms can impact the East Coast and the Northern Plains, thunderstorms rip across the South and Midwest, rivers overflow their banks and heat waves begin in the Southwest.

    With the Spring Storms, El Nino, and Earthquakes, too, there's one hazard that can strike the coasts at any time: tsunamis.

    Make sure you and your loved ones are prepared for the hazardous weather this spring will
    bring by watching out for Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEAs) and checking out the National Weather Service's Spring Safety website!

    One-Size-Fits-All Disposable Rain Ponchos serve a myriad of uses - Rain Suits, too! One-Size-Fits-All Disposable Rain Ponchos serve a myriad of uses - Rain Suits, too!

     

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